What's Up at the Library?

 
It's official! Arlington Heights won WGN-TV's first Battle of the 'Burbs, edging out Mount Prospect, 4-3, in a wacky games showdown featured on the Morning News, Thursday, February 19.
 
Hosted by WGN's Ana Belaval, Team Arlington Heights included the library’s Executive Director Jason Kuhl along with Mayor Tom Hayes, Arlington Park Bugler Monica Benson, SALUTE Founder Will Beiersdorf, and Chicago AAA Insurance Agent Matthew Staley. Mount Prospect's team included Mayor Arlene Juracek along with four other local leaders and business owners.
 
The competition played out throughout the morning broadcast and included a series of zaney events ranging from an egg pass and Bozo buckets to pin the mustache on the news anchor and a water balloon toss. In the end, Team Arlington Heights cinched the title by one point and secured bragging rights in the northwest 'burbs.
 
Watch Battle of the 'Burbs highlights including a pie-eating competition.
 
Picture: Go, Team Arlington Heights!  Left to right are Will Beiersdorf, Jason Kuhl, Monica Benson, Matthew Staley and Tom Hayes.


In the news
 
The library celebrated all things Harry Potter on Thursday, February 5 and more than 200 people turned out for an evening of fun fit for a wizard. Wearing costumes and signature Harry styles, participants soaked in the magic and rolled up their sleeves for Hogwarts-themed activities in the Marketplace, the Hub and Kids' World: a potions class, owl examinations, a chance to make a Golden Snitch and the opportunity to don the Sorting Hat. Awards were given for best costumes and both wizards and Muggles alike enjoyed Harry Potter-inspired treats.
 
Harry Potter Book Night was a first time event in which libraries, schools and community groups around the world joined together on the same night to host celebrations honoring J.K. Rowling’s unforgettable stories and the magic of Harry Potter.


Kids' World
 
How do you take an existing product and make it better? Just ask the 29 eighth graders at Thomas Middle School who recently completed a new, 9-week elective focused on three-dimensional printing, research and design. Titled 3D RD, the first-time course challenged the students to create or redesign every day products using 3D technology resources available both at school and at the library including Tinkercad, an online design application, and the Hub’s MakerBot 3D printer.

The course culminated on January 20 when the students presented their final 3D projects before an audience of some 50 parents and teachers. Thomas Middle School Principal Brian Kaye emceed the program which was held in the Hub. Students presented ideas and 3D models that ranged from a clever set of interchangeable scissors handles, designed by Arlington Heights students Zoe Axelrod and Annie Waz, to an always in demand TV remote holder.

“Give me a show of hands, how many of you guys have lost your remotes,” asked Emil Harb and Michael Macynski, the student engineers of a sleekly-designed TV remote holder. “This is the item that shall fulfill your needs!”

In all 12 groups of students presented and displayed their printed 3D prototypes at the library.

“The kids were really well-prepared,” says Teen Services Supervisor Tom Spicer, who worked with the District 25 students. “It was really great to see that they were able to start using the modeling software to design and print workable prototypes and products.”

“It was really gratifying to see the students present their final products,” added Jim Grant, Thomas Middle School industrial technology teacher and creator of the class. “It was fun trying something new, and it was great working with the Hub staff. The teamwork between the school and library provided enhanced learning for the students and resulted in some really innovative and creative 3D products.”

Thomas Middle School will offer 3D RD in the spring with a new class starting in April.


 
In recognition of the library's recent five-star rating, Illinois State Representative David Harris delivered a special congratulatory message direct from Springfield to the Library Board of Trustees. Speaking at their monthly meeting on January 20, Harris presented the Illinois House of Representatives Certificate of Recognition to Board President Kerry Pearson and Executive Director Jason Kuhl. The certificate reads:
 
"The 98th General Assembly, House of Representatives, acknowledges Arlington Heights Memorial Library in recognition of receiving a five star rating in Library Journal's national rating of public libraries for seven years in a row."
 
The library was one of only 21 libraries in the nation to have earned five stars for each of the past seven years. Star ratings are based on the annual number of library visits, circulation, program attendance and public Internet computer use. The library's range of programs for children, teens and adults plus specialized services offered in the library's Business Center and Training Center were key in receiving this distinctive recognition.
 
"When I heard about the five-star rating I said that's a real achievement," Harris added. "It speaks well of the board, the staff and overall of the community's involvement. Hats off to all of you for what you do."
 
 
PHOTO: Left to right - Board President Kerry Pearson, Representative David Harris and Executive Director Jason Kuhl.



Come explore our re-designed digital media lab, the Studio, and get creative.  Interested in making your own movie or music video, or maybe you would like to touch up some old family photos?  Make a reservation for up to two hours at a time or drop in. If you need help with your project, you can make an appointment for one-to-one assistance.  Learn more about the Studio. Funded by the Friends of the Library.
 
Available for Arlington Heights residents ages 12 and older, business cardholders and local high school students.
 
 
 
 

 



 
For the seventh consecutive time, Arlington Heights Memorial Library has received a five-star rating in Library Journal's national rating of public libraries. Five stars is the highest rating that a library can receive, and we are one of only 21 libraries in the nation to have earned five stars for each of the past seven years. Star ratings are based on the annual number of library visits, circulation, program attendance and public Internet computer use.
 
This is an honor for not only our staff and the Library Board of Trustees, but also for you, our customers. Thank you for making us a 5-star library once again. See Library Journal's 2014 index of star libraries.
 


 
Oculus Rift, the future of 3D virtual reality and interactive video gaming, has arrived at the library. On Saturday, December 13 more than 115 customers, of all ages, dropped by the Marketplace for a hands-on demonstration of the head-mounted virtual reality device. Resembling a pair of ski goggles, the Oculus Rift headset displays a 3D experience that makes you feel like you're part of the game. Nearly 40 people had the opportunity to try it out first-hand. Here are some of their reactions:
 
“IT WAS AWESOME!!!”
“It was very nice being able to experience this piece of technology through the library.”
“Excellent! Thank you for offering this experience.”
 
If you'd like to learn about and experience Oculus Rift, look for these upcoming programs:
 
Oculus Rift: Making Virtual Reality a Reality
Date and time: Saturdays, January 17 and February 28, 1–3 p.m.
Location: The Marketplace
 
Drop in
Come early to sign up for a demo as time slots fill up fast. For ages 13 and up.


 
One of the library's goals is to be the go-to place for residents to learn the tech skills they need for business, school and home.  Check out Treehouse, an online resource for learning advanced tech skills such as coding, web design and app development. Arlington Heights cardholders can enroll in any of eight different tech tracks that can ultimately give the user the ability to create an online portfolio to show to potential employers.  Learn more about Treehouse and get started today.
 



Shared reading is the best way to help babies, toddlers, and preschoolers develop the important early literacy skills they need to learn how to read independently later on. The more books children ages 0–5 hear, the more prepared they will be to learn how to read. It’s never too early to start.
 
1000 Books Before Kindergarten is a new reading program for young children. Although 1000 books sounds like a lot, it’s only three shared reading sessions a day for a year. Here's how it works:

Register here or in Kids’ World.
• Start reading and counting!
• Drop by Kids’ World to check in and receive prizes. 
• The library will host a 1000 Books Celebration in May 2015, but the program doesn’t end until your child enters kindergarten. 
 

Helping your child develop early literacy begins with cuddling up and sharing a good book. Research shows that children become readers on the lap of a caring adult. Join us as we reach for 1000!

 


Kids' World
 
Arlington Heights resident Isabel Frye celebrated her 9th birthday in a very fun and creative way on Saturday, October 25. Her parents planned a scavenger hunt and hid clues at five stops around town including the library. The 10 party goers descended on Kids’ World mid-afternoon and after some quick sleuthing on the computer, they discovered their next clue – a scroll hidden inside a children’s book featuring The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe. The cryptic message directed the kids to a different section of the library where a costumed Edgar (Isabel’s uncle) presented a very special and theatrical reading of Poe’s eerie poem to Isabel (pictured wearing blue bow) and friends. 


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6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy