What's Up at the Library?

 
The Arlington Heights Memorial Library celebrated its biggest FanCon yet as more than 900 residents of all ages stopped by the library's third annual comic book and pop culture convention on Saturday, June 14.
 
The convention gave fans an opportunity to see and dress up as their favorite characters from Marvel, Star Wars, Pokémon, Harry Potter and more.
 
"It's fun seeing a bunch of people into the same thing as you," said 12-year-old Colin Ryan, who was one of the runner-ups in the Super Smash Bros. tournament hosted by the cosplay group, The Age of the Geeks.
 
The tournament was one of more than 20 activities convention-goers could take part in throughout the day.
 
Best-selling author and illustrator Jeffrey Brown, who is known for his Jedi Academy series as well as the Darth Vader and Son series, was one of the biggest highlights of the convention as he met fans while hosting an artist talk, two book signings and a drawing workshop.
 
Other popular activities included Etch A Sketch workshops with artist Princess Etch, lightsaber training sessions for young Jedi, fandom-related arts and crafts in the Hub and Artists' Alley, which gave library customers a chance to meet 12 featured artists and exhibitors in the library's Hendrickson Room.
 
"This is awesome, it's great for families," said Lisa Cuffe, who came to FanCon with her family of four. When the family found out that FanCon was taking place at the library, they rushed home to dress up in costume before returning to take part in the festivities. "You usually can't bring kids to these kind of events, so we're going to do this every year if we can."
 


 
Dreams come through under the red, white and blue was the theme of this year's annual Fourth of July Parade and we helped celebrate this year with a variety of your favorite characters including Batman, Wonder Woman and those from Star Wars. Our parade entry also included the library's bookmobile and a replica 1960s Batmobile. Special thanks to all of the library staff, library board members, Kids' World interns, our Summer Volunteer Squad and our special superhero and Star Wars guests who helped represent the library during the parade and passed out nearly 5000 superhero masks to parade goers in celebration of the library's upcoming FanCon, which will take place at the library on Saturday, July 14, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Learn more about FanCon at ahml.info/fancon.


 
You’re never too old to travel! That’s the idea behind a new library outreach program for seniors that utilizes Google Expeditions, a virtual reality experience to give older adults the thrill of visiting virtually anywhere in the world.

“It was an out of body experience,” recounted Ida, a resident at The Highlands at The Moorings of Arlington Heights, who at 91-years-young recently experienced virtual reality for the first time. Ida, along with 30 other residents, donned a pair of virtual reality goggles and was soon transfixed with a 360-view of Thomas Jefferson’s home, Monticello. She explored room after room of the Virginia estate, as well as the gardens where Jefferson cultivated 250 varieties of vegetables. 

“You could see it, touch it, taste it. It was amazing, so beautiful and very impressive.”

The visit to Monticello marks the second adventure in the library's travel outreach series, which started last fall with a visit to Brazil for residents at local memory care, assisted living and skilled care communities. Both destinations were a hit and like any good vacation, the pay-offs linger long after you return home. 

“It rejuvenated me,” said Ida. “I came in as 91 and the experience made me feel like a new person.”


Adults
 
"What would happen if I took all those colors, turned them into a song and then turned it into a book" asked acclaimed children's book author and illustrator Chris Raschka as he used a color wheel and his book, Mysterious Thelonious, to introduce an audience of eager children to music as a form of storytelling.
 
The kids held onto the colorful pages of Raschka's book as it stretched across the Hendrickson Room floor while Raschka performed a song using his concertina, a musical instrument that bears a resemblance to an accordion. This was all part of an interactive storytime event that took place on Friday, June 29 at the library.
 
This storytime was just one of several programs that took place this week and gave residents a one-of-a-kind opportunity to meet and get creative with Raschka, who is the library's summer artist in residence.
 
Based in Brooklyn, Raschka is known for using watercolor, pastel and charcoal pencil to create artwork with bright colors, freeform shapes and a vivid sense of movement and rhythm. He has authored more than 60 children's books and has been selected for The New York Times' Ten Best Illustrated Books of the Year list multiple times. His most recent book, New Shoes, was published in May 2018.
 
During his artist-in-residency, Raschka put on a bookmaking workshop for kids on Wednesday, June 27 that gave children the chance to put together their own story. He created a pop-up art studio the following day in the library's Marketplace where kids were able to see him at work and feed off of his creativity and imagination. Raschka held an artist talk and book signing on Thursday, June 28 as well.
 
His interactive storytime on Friday then gave children a lot to do as he performed interactive read-alongs of his books Yo! Yes? and Charlie Parker Played Be Bop, held several plays that let the kids act as characters like Moosey Moose, Lamby Lamb and Crabby Crab and let the children dance to the music of jazz composer Sun Ra. He also held a second live art-demo in the library's Marketplace on Friday.
 
Raschka's week at the library will conclude with a bookmaking workshop for adults on Saturday, June 30. Bravo! Chris Raschka, Raschka's exhibit that showcases more than 50 works of art, will continue to be on display in the Marketplace through Sunday, August 12. This exhibition was organized by the National Center for Children's Illustrated Literature, Abilene, Texas.


 
A warm and sunny afternoon on the soccer fields at Sunset Meadows feels a world away from the cold and snowy night last February when Genevieve Hill joined 400 other area teens to check out the library’s Sixth Annual Teen Job Fair and the more than two dozen area businesses and organizations looking to hire students. 
 
“I checked out a lot of the tables and there were so many different options that I didn’t know about,” says the 16-year-old Arlington Heights resident. “I liked the Park District because I thought it would be so nice to work outside.” 
 
The Arlington Heights Park District liked Genevieve’s credentials, as well. After review of her online application and an interview, she was hired.  Training and certification soon followed and this spring the Hersey High School varsity soccer player officially began her very first job –an assistant referee for soccer.
 
“I’ve been playing soccer since I was three, and I used to play park district soccer,” said Genevieve.  “So being a soccer ref and getting to be outside, it is the perfect job.”
 
The Teen Job Fair is an annual event at the library presented in partnership with the Arlington Heights Youth Commission.
 


Adults
 
Don't have the internet at home? Going on vacation and need a reliable connection? Working out of the office and want offsite internet? The library is excited to begin lending its ten new Mobile Hotspots to Arlington Heights cardholders.
 
What is a Hotspot?
  • A hotspot is a device that uses a cellular connection to provide internet access to your devices.
  • Connect your device to the hotspot via Wi-Fi and browse the internet with up to 4G LTE speeds.
  • Franklin R910 Mobile Hotspots:
  - Allow multiple users/devices to connect to internet.
  - Have up to 12 hour battery life.
  - Work only in the U.S.
 
Who can check out a Hotspot?
  • Hotspots are only available to Arlington Heights Memorial Library cardholders.
 

Where can I check out a Hotspot?

 
How long can I keep it?
 
Is internet usage tracked by the library?
 
 


 
"Making a World of Difference" was the theme of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library's Annual Volunteer Recognition Luncheon, which honored the library's 426 volunteers who contributed 28,413 hours of service in 2017.
 
"We've been able to maintain our imagination and stretch our excellence," said library board president Debbie Smart to a large gathering of volunteers on Tuesday, May 8. "We're bigger and better than ever and that's because of you."
 
The afternoon served as a reminder of the world of difference that each volunteer has made at the library.
 
"Volunteers are not in this for the recognition," said library Volunteer Coordinator Kelley McCoy. "They just do it because it's in their hearts."
 
Funded by the Friends of the Library, this year's gathering honored those who volunteer in all areas of the library including the English as a Second Language (ESL) office, Kids' World, genealogy, the Senior Center, the Friends of the Library and the bookmobile.
 
Thirty-one volunteers received special recognition for achieving Hours of Service milestones from 500 hours to 16,500 hours. Years of service were also recognized and spanned from three years to 35 years of service.
 
The top honor of the day went to Al Hong, who was named Volunteer of the Year. This one-time award is given to the volunteer who has contributed the greatest number of hours during the previous year but has not previously received the award. He earned Volunteer of the Year for contributing 322 hours of service in 2017 by working in the library's ESL office.

"[Volunteering] lets me have a chance to encourage younger people and newer immigrants in our community," he said. He began volunteering at the library in 2016 and hopes that by displaying the importance of volunteering, his younger acquaintances and family members will follow his lead and volunteer as well.
 
Those who have worked with him spoke positively about his time at the library.
 
"I had the pleasure of meeting Al Hong at one of our volunteer meetings this spring," said ESL Coordinator Tracy Karim. "Hearing him speak about his experience with tutoring our ESL students, and his obvious passion for helping them not only to improve their English language abilities, but also with so many facets of life, literally brought tears to my eyes. He so deserves this award."


 
The library’s new subscription to PressReader offers access to thousands of newspapers and magazines from around the world and in dozens of languages – from daily issues of The Chicago Tribune and Sun-Times to India’s Hindustan Times and Magazine Futbol Tactico from Argentina. To learn more visit PressReader here


 
“My cerebral palsy affects my speech and mobility but not my spirit.” In 12 short words, Arlington Heights resident Esther Lee gives voice to her life’s work: disability law attorney, president of Able Community—a nonprofit housing improving independence for people with disabilities, and writer and creator of poetry with a purpose.

“Common themes of my poetry are home, or longing for home, and belonging, or in most cases not belonging,” Lee shared in an email.

 
It was a love for writing poetry that led her to explore Writer’s Ink, the library’s monthly meeting for local writers. Lee, who graduated from Thomas Middle School, holds a Juris Doctor degree from the University of California Davis, School of Law, focusing on civil rights and public interest law. She also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, having graduated with honors and an emphasis on creative writing.
 
“I was used to workshopping my poetry with classmates as a rhetoric major in college, but I wasn’t sure what to expect from this group at a public library,” Lee shared. “I was apprehensive (at first), especially being one of the youngest writers there and a poet in a room full of fiction writers. Fortunately, everyone has always been welcoming.” 
 
Lee has been participating in Writer’s Ink for about a year. At a Wednesday evening meet-up, she and seven other aspiring writers gathered with writing coach and facilitator Jacob Knabb around a conference room table to share their latest work. Earlier in the day, Lee had emailed Knabb her poem, “There’s An Elephant Living Upstairs,” so that he could read it aloud to the group for critique. She listened attentively and through a computer-activated voice assistance device asked the group if they thought the ending was ‘too easy or too in your face?’
 
I like the abruptness of it, “Knabb assured her. “It’s lovely broken into verse, quite perfect in that shape.”

“Jacob always strives to give us feedback to improve our writing,” Esther shared following the meeting. “I haven’t worked with many fiction writers, so I am learning more about narrative and memoirs, as there are a lot of memoirists in the group.”

 
“Esther makes them feel a comradery, there’s a certain comfort there,” Knabb added while reflecting on the dynamics of the group. “Her poetry is honest and real and explores topics that allow others in the group to open up.”
 
Find an upcoming Writer's Ink meeting to join on our calendar
 


The Arlington Heights Memorial Library is now offering two new resources to help aid genealogy and history research. The first is Proquest Historical Newspapers, which adds to the access the library already had for the historical Chicago Tribune (1849-1993). New historical titles include The New York Times (1851-2013), The Chicago Defender (1910-1975), the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (1874-1922), The Baltimore Sun (1837-1991) and The Irish Times/The Weekly Irish Times (1859-2015). These are fully-scanned articles and pages from the original newspapers, complete with photos, advertisements, classifieds, obituaries and death notices, and are especially valuable both to genealogists and students working on history projects (looking for primary sources, historical price information, etc.).
 
The second resource is American Ancestors, a collection of genealogy databases maintained by the New England Historic Genealogical Society with over 14 billion records pulled from military sources, vital records, family histories, census data, etc. Full access to records is available inside the library. Users outside the library have limited access to freely-available records.
 
Resources such as Proquest Historical Newspapers can be found by visiting the library's Research webpage and clicking on the Databases tab.


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6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
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