What's Up at the Library?

 
For the ninth consecutive year, Arlington Heights Memorial Library has received a five-star rating in Library Journal's national rating of public libraries. Five stars is the highest rating that a library can receive. Star ratings are based on the annual number of library visits, circulation, program attendance, public Internet computer use and circulation of electronic materials.
 
In 2016, 7,349 U.S. public libraries qualified to be rated on the Library Journal Index of Public Library Service. This year there are 260 Star Libraries, each receiving three-star, four-star, or five-star designations.
 
Nineteen libraries in Illinois have been named Star Libraries for 2016, and out of these 19 libraries, Arlington Heights Memorial Library was one of just three public libraries in the state to earn a top five-star rating.
 

This is an honor for not only our staff and the Board of Library Trustees, but also for you, our customers. Thank you for making us a five-star library once again. Read more about Library Journal's 2016 index of America's Star Libraries here.

 


 
Arlington Heights cardholders can schedule a one-hour appointment to have their resumes reviewed. Maximum of two reviews within a six-month period or three reviews in a one-year period.
 
Date and time: Tuesday and Thursday evenings and Wednesdays afternoons
Location: Appointment Room next to the Shackley Room
 


Adults, business
 
"I was always looking at the world as a laboratory of ideas," author Eric Weiner told an audience of 180 people who gathered at the library on November 3 to hear the award-winning journalist and NPR contributor speak about his latest book, The Geography of Genius: A Search for the Worlds' Most Creative Places, from Ancient Athens to Silicon Valley, the 2016 One Book, One Village (OBOV) selection.
 
In an interview-style program moderated by guest interviewer Mary Luckritz, Head of the English and Fine Arts Division at Rolling Meadows High School, Weiner spoke candidly about his writing career which has evolved from veteran war correspondent covering Middle East conflicts to that of nonfiction travel writer.
 
"I'd come back from reporting on places like Afghanistan and people would ask me 'but what was it really like over there,'" said Weiner. "I realized that what people wanted to know or really wanted to hear were the stories of locals talking in bars or cafes and what their lives were like."
 
These encounters gave rise to Weiner's current assignment of "travel with a purpose," and three award-winning books which intimately explore places around the globe and cleverly connect them with ideas like bliss, divinity and the theme of this year's OBOV selection - genius and creativity.
 
"One trait all geniuses or places of genius share is an openness to experience," said Weiner citing cities like Athens, Vienna and Florence then adding, "Geniuses are the people who look at something that everyone else sees and they see something different."
 
Following the 50-minute conversation on-stage, the author fielded questions from the audience with Weiner jokingly describing the perfect suitcase "bulletproof and easy to grab my phone and notebook" to offering advice on nurturing creativity.
 
"Take breaks from your work, go for a walk...encourage messiness, have conversations, lots of conversations," Weiner reflected, "You have to be willing to take a detour and realize the destination may not be where you expected."

An Evening with Author Eric Weiner event capped off a day-long exchange between the Washington, D.C.-based author and the Arlington Heights community about The Geography of Genius. Earlier in the day, he spoke to 130 students at Rolling Meadows High School. Read more in the Daily Herald.
 


 
Albert Einstein was a C student. A messy desk isn't a bad thing, and it's good to surround yourself with wackiness. These were just a few of the facts and nuggets of advice that author Eric Weiner shared with District 214 students during a visit earlier today to Rolling Meadows High School. Weiner's session with the students was the first stop in a day-long visit to Arlington Heights to talk about his book, The Geography of Genius, A Search for the World's Most Creative Places from Athens to Silicon Valley, the library's selection for this year's One Book, One Village community read.
 
"Talent is hitting a mark no one can hit. Genius is hitting a mark no one else can see," Weiner told the students who gathered in the school's Resource Center for a 45-minute session with the author during which he shared insights on creativity, genius and his life as a writer traveling the globe.
 
"I always feel like there is some great wonder around the corner," Weiner said, "You just have to find the corner."
 
More than 300 students at Rolling Meadows High School read The Geography of Genius as summer reading or for a class this fall. Following his talk, the students had an opportunity to ask Weiner questions including, "What is the hardest part of traveling?"
 
"The hardest part of traveling is trusting the universe to provide you with experiences," he said. "Traveling is not about a place but rather it's a new way of looking at things and coming away seeing things differently."

 




What is punk music? What led to its creation? And what kind of parallels can we see today? These are just a few of the questions that were explored in the library’s Sound Opinions program at Metropolis Performing Arts Centre.

Using a mix of historical perspective, video clips and an audience question-and-answer period, Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot discussed 1977, the year punk music emerged from London and New York, with a crowd of more than 150 music enthusiasts. Punk rock, which has proven influential on everything that's followed, erupted in those two cities out of an uneasy stew of economic inequality, political and racial tensions, budding anger, riots, unrest, and even blackouts and heat waves; and a sense that we all had "no future" -- a time, in other words, not unlike today.
 
Punk is about having an “attitude of defiance” and wearing it proudly, said Kot. The guiding principle was to “take everything negative that’s being thrown at us and throw it back at them.” Bands like the Ramones, Sex Pistols, New York Dolls, Blondie, the Clash, Talking Heads and Wire epitomized this turbulent time in history. The Sound Opinions hosts discussed how “being punk” meant “you didn’t want to be homogenized,” and that this sensibility has repeated itself over time, from grunge to alternative to rap and DIY culture; with a subset of artists always seeking to break away from the norm and rebel.
 
Punk Rock 1977: The Sound of Genius was created for the library in partnership with Metropolis featuring the expertise of Kot, who has worked for the Chicago Tribune since 1990 as a music critic; and DeRogatis, who has worked for the Chicago Sun-Times as a music critic for 15 years and now lectures full-time at Columbia College. Together they brought more than 40 years of experience to this lively conversation examining the idea of particularly "magical" times and places that result in a creative explosion – themes echoed in The Geography of Genius: A Search for the World's Most Creative Places, from Ancient Athens to Silicon Valley, the selected title for this year's One Book, One Village community read.

WBEZ’s Sound Opinions broadcasts to more than 120 radio stations across the country and has produced more than 550 episodes. It can be heard in the Chicago market on WBEZ on Fridays and Saturdays. For more information, visit soundopinions.org. For more information on this year's One Book, One Village community read and its related programs, visit ahml.info/onebook.
 


 
It’s never too early to start reading to babies, toddlers and preschoolers to help develop early literacy skills. Research shows children become readers on the lap of a caring adult and the more books children ages 0-5 hear, the more prepared they will be to learn how to read later on.
 
1000 Books Before Kindergarten is a reading program for young children that began at the library in September 2014. Last year 38 area preschools and 702 individuals participated. Although 1000 books sounds like a lot, it’s only three shared reading sessions a day for a year. So how does it work?
 

• Register here or in Kids’ World.
• Start reading and counting.
• Drop by Kids’ World to check in and receive prizes.
• The program continues until your child enters kindergarten.
• Find more details at ahml.info/1000books.

 
 
How to Grow a Reader
  • Reading aloud to your child is the single most important thing you can do to help your child be ready to read.
  • We can help you find age-appropriate titles and topics for your child. Ask a librarian for help in choosing books for your baby, toddler or preschooler.
  • You are your child’s first and best teacher. Children learn best through playful interaction with a caring adult.
  • Talk, sing, read, write and play! Engaging in these five practices with your child will help him or her develop early literacy skills.
  • To learn more, sign up for our quarterly Ready to Read eNewsletter.


 
New York Times best-selling author Trenton Lee Stewart, author of the Mysterious Benedict Society series, greeted more than 100 fans in the Hendrickson Room recently and talked about his books and his life as a writer. Stewart discussed his favorite books, including Watership Down, Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh, and The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. He also talked about The Hobbit and how he wanted all of his books to be like the “Riddles in the Dark” chapter from that book. Stewart made a connection between The Lord of the Rings and his new book, The Secretkeepers, by making comparisons between the ring from Lord of the Rings and the pocket watch from The Secretkeepers and how both can make you invisible.  The audience had a good time thinking about what they could do if they were invisible for a day. Customers also enjoyed hearing about Stewart’s inspiration for the Mysterious Benedict Society and the many characters from those books.


 
On September 20, Marianthi Thanopoulos of Arlington Heights was sworn in as the newest member of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library Board of Trustees. She will serve until the next general election on April 4, 2017.
 
Thanopoulos is the Community Engagement Liaison for the Village of Mount Prospect and a documentary producer. She obtained a Masters of Arts in social sciences from the University of Chicago and a Bachelor of Arts in communications from DePaul University. She formerly served as a communication and marketing liaison for the Evanston Public Library and describes herself as an “avid reader” who “deeply understands the value that people place on Library services, programs, events and community outreach.”
 
The seven-member Board of Library Trustees sets the library’s tax levy and budget as well as library policies. Trustees are elected for six-year terms.
 


 
"It's a book about ideas," said Executive Director Jason Kuhl as he spread the word at Monday night's Village board meeting about the library's third annual One Book, One Village community read. Presenting to Mayor Tom Hayes and the village trustees, Kuhl invited all of Arlington Heights to read this year's book choice, The Geography of Genius by Eric Weiner, which explores why creative genius flourishes at specific places and at specific times. The mayor in turn thanked Kuhl and the library "for your dedication in developing more geniuses in the village of Arlington Heights."
 
Check out a copy of the book today. Then join us for An Evening with Author Eric Weiner on Thursday, November 3 beginning at 7 p.m. in the Hendrickson Room. Registration opens on October 1.
 
 


 
Online Tools for Back to School
Find these at http://www.ahml.info/kids/school_help and http://www.ahml.info/teens/study (except for Testing & Education Reference Center, which is not on the kids’ page)
 
Encyclopedia Britannica: The world-renowned reference tool, with articles, images, videos and helpful links on almost every topic (countries, people, animals, science, etc.). Three versions: For Children, For Young Adults and Reference Center. 1st grade-adult.
 
Student Resources in Context: Reference articles, overviews and magazine journal articles on all topics. Helpful at term paper time! 5th grade-adult.
 
PebbleGo: For emergent readers--short articles and videos about animals, science, biographies and social science. K-2nd grade.
 
Core Concepts (Biology, Chemistry & Periodic Table): Overview articles to help understand important scientific principles. 7th-12 grades.
 
CultureGrams: Detailed overviews of all the world’s countries: government, population, daily life, etc. 3rd-12th grades.
 
Visual Thesaurus: Love wordplay? Use Visual Thesaurus to explore connections between words and build your vocabulary. Read fun, informative articles about the interesting ways in which we use words. There’s even an online spelling be you can join. Also great for ESL learners. 6th grade-adult.
 
Testing & Education Reference Center: Online test prep for ACT, the new SAT, GRE, MCAT, LSAT, GED etc., as well as several vocational tests (ASVAB, PRAXIS, etc.) and language/citizenship tests. High school students can do college and scholarship searches, and job seekers can use a resume-building tool. 10th grade-adult.
 
Tutor.com: Live online tutoring for students in all topics (math, science, social studies, etc.). Older students can get help with standardized test prep and adults can take advantage of their resume-writing assistance. 1st grade-adult.
 


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If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy