What's Up at the Library?

 
"We choose to live the way we do and participate the way we do," said Dave Eggers to an audience of more than 350 people who packed the Forest View Auditorium on Thursday evening October 12 to hear the award-winning writer, editor and philanthropist speak as he touched on topics like privacy, surveillance and free choice -- all central themes in his dystopian novel The Circle, the 2017 One Book, One Village (OBOV) selection.
 
In an interview-style program moderated by the library's Info Services Supervisor Pam Schwarting, Eggers settled in and talked about his artistic path, which began in the first grade in the Lake Forest public schools and continued with "an uninterrupted string of awesome teachers" who helped spark his interest in writing. A focus on painting followed in middle school and high school.
 
"I trained as an artist, every bone in my body thought I'd be a painter," Eggers said.
 
It was as a sophomore studying at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign that Eggers switched his focus from painting to journalism and his life as a writer took hold.
 
“I came of age with a desktop computer and learned to write on a Mac," Eggers said, then joked, "I'm inherently a slob so the desktop allowed me to revise, revise, revise.”
 
This process of writing, and re-writing, continues still today. Eggers, who describes himself as "an endless reviser," shared with the audience his typical work day. He writes in his home office in his converted garage where there is no phone or internet.
 
“It's taken me a long time to get settled and to remember where I am with what I'm writing," Eggers explained. "I have a chair, a wingback chair...I sit in that chair for eight hours to get 45 minutes done.”
 
This process has resulted in an extensive eclectic body of work. Eggers is the author of 10 books including fiction and nonfiction. His debut, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, was a New York Times bestselling memoir and a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2001. Other works include Zeitoun, Heroes of the Frontier, A Hologram for the King, a finalist for the 2012 National Book Award, and the international bestseller, The Circle
 
Eggers told the audience he took notes for about 10 years on situations involving individual's freedoms and privacy versus society's safety and right to know before writing The Circle.
 
"I do believe a human under surveillance is not free," Eggers said. He described the rise of social media and the increased use of measurements as "the new neediness." While reflecting about the choices his characters make in The Circle, Eggers described their situations as "51/49" since they deal with the ever-pressing struggle of finding ways for improving the world without stripping people of their rights.
 
Following the 60-minute onstage presentation, Eggers took questions from the audience, which highlighted some of his philanthropic work including 826 National, a network of tutoring centers around the country including one here in Wicker Park.
 

An Evening with Author Dave Eggers and his appearance in Arlington Heights came on the heels of Eggers receiving the prestigious Carl Sandburg Literary Award in Chicago on October 11. Reflecting on this honor, which is presented to a writer in recognition of the totality of his or her work, Eggers said, "I'm very humbled and happy that I can sit in my garage and write."

 


 
It was all eyes skyward as hundreds gathered in North School Park for today's viewing of the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in nearly 100 years! People settled in, many setting up picnic-style at this library event, to take in the eclipse as it unfolded overhead. Even the clouds that rolled in couldn't dampen the crowd's enthusiasm as people took turns sharing viewing glasses and together marveled at the cosmic experience with comments like "look up, look up....awesome and totally amazing!"
 
In addition to viewing the eclipse with solar glasses, the library also offered telescope viewing at the park, eclipse-themed crafts and a monitor for watching a live feed from NASA as the eclipse made its way coast to coast. The NASA feed was also shown in the library's Training Center and Hendrickson Room.


Adults, Family
 
It's a wrap! Thanks to all of the filmmakers, judges and student film supporters involved in making this year's Teen Film Fest a success.

Congratulations to the winning films:
  • Best Animation: Lightlife in the Woods by Valerie Depa
  • Best Comedy: 5 Steps to Getting Your Teacher to Like You by Allison Flondro
  • Best Drama / Documentary:  Soldier's Journey Home by Andrew Wisniewski
  • Best Experimental / Music Video: Wanderlust by Kathleen Oku
  • Best Horror: E.D. by David Petratos
  • Best Overall: Epic Rap Battles of History: Woodrow Wilson vs. Theodore Roosevelt by Jeevan Archarya
 
Thank you to our judges, Tamara Chambers, Robert Kraybill and Dann Gire.


 
Summer months were busy ones as families and readers of all ages worked to Build a Better World through this year's summer reading challenges. Parents enjoyed working with their children to practice kindness. Tweens and teens came out in record numbers, pushing themselves to read more diverse books. And hundreds of adults shared thanks for the people in their life who go above and beyond on our interactive chalkboard displays.

Overall, more than 4,000 babies, kids, tweens, teens and adults participated, broadening their reading selections and their world view. Some children who completed the summer reading program even used their final book prize as an opportunity to give back. They were excited to choose a book, not for themselves, but to share with a younger child.
 
What new experiences did you read about this summer? How did you give back to the community? It's never too late! Let’s all be inspired to Build a Better World all year long.
 


 
The library is now offering cardholders access to a new database called Pivot, a major resource for researching grants and funding opportunities. Pivot is intuitive and easy to use. Customers can use Pivot to research grant sources for organizations, small businesses and individuals.
 
Just some of the areas included in Pivot's research include STEM Education, Clean Technology, Energy Industry, Sustainable Design, Green Buildings, Cloud Computing and Urban Farming.
 
Learn more by visiting Pivot from our Online Databases page. 



As of August 1, the AHML mobile app will be discontinued. You will still be able to manage your account, search our catalog, and register for programs on your phone or tablet using our mobile-friendly website, http://www.ahml.info.

We encourage our app users to bookmark our mobile menu screen at http://www.ahml.info/mobile.html. You will still be able to manage your account, search our catalog, place a hold and register for programs on your phone or tablet using our mobile-friendly website. The mobile site is accessible from any browser. By August 1, the library’s mobile website will have the added feature of allowing you to display your barcode on your mobile device. Navigate to My Account as of August 1, and you’ll see an option to display your library card’s barcode. You can then use this barcode at our self-checkout stations or at our Checkout Desk in the library. 

Feel free to contact the library for assistance.
 
If you would like to create an icon on your device's home screen so you still can access our website quickly, follow the instructions below:

For Android Devices:
Chrome
1. Open the Chrome app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Select the Options button (located in the top right corner of the app)
4. Select "Add to Home Screen"
5. Name your bookmark and click Add
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen

Firefox
1. Open the Firefox app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Select the Options button (located in the top right corner of the app)
4. Select "Page"
5. Select "Add to Home Screen"
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen

For iPhone and Apple Devices
1. Open the Safari app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Tap the Share button at the bottom of the screen
4. Select "Add to Home Screen"
5. Name your bookmark and save it
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen
If you have any questions, please contact the library for assistance
 


 
Heading abroad over the summer? Make sure to learn the language. The library offers a number of free online language-learning tools:

• Little Pim: Fun, easy lessons for kids, pre-K to 2nd grade. It covers Spanish, French, Chinese, Italian, Japanese, Hebrew, English, German, Arabic, Russian.
• Mango Languages: Lively introductory lessons for 72 languages. Special “Conversations” lessons give you a quick-start. Some language lessons also have full-length foreign-language feature films (for adult audiences) to help improve your language comprehension.
• Pronunciator: Covers over 80 languages. Many have “8-Week Travel Prep” lessons and scheduled “Live Conversation” sessions that let you talk in real-time with a Pronunciator representative. Kids can use their special “Young Learners” lessons. Pronunciator is a more in-depth resource and includes a special evaluation tool to help improve your pronunciation skills.
 
Both Mango and Pronunciator are also valuable tools for learning English as a Second Language (ESL).
 


 
Arlington Heights cardholders now have access to Kanopy, a collection of over 30,000 films from over 1,000 top producers, such as Criterion Collection, The Great Courses, PBS, Media Education Foundation, Stanford Executive Briefings, New Day Films, Cohen Films, California Newsreel, Collective Eye and more. Sample feature film titles include Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon, Jean Cocteau’s Beauty and the Beast, Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times, and the documentary Grey Gardens.
 
Kanopy launches on average 500 new releases per month, ensuring the collection is fresh with the new content. You can watch up to eight videos per month and never need to place a hold. 
 
The link to Kanopy is on the library's Downloads page or you can bookmark http://ahml.kanopystreaming.com. Once you're there, click on the "Sign Up" link and create your profile (you'll be asked for you AHML card number).


On Tuesday, May 16, the newest members of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library Board of Trustees were sworn in. The seven-member Board of Library Trustees sets the library’s tax levy and budget as well as library policies. Trustees are elected for six-year terms.
 
Debbie Smart Debbie Smart has served as a trustee for six years and has held the positions of treasurer and president of the Board of Library Trustees. She is a member of the Rotary Club of Arlington Heights, Arlington Heights Historical Society, Questers, Kappa Delta Sorority, Arlington Heights Art Commission, St. John UCC Church and the Chamber of Commerce. She was a recipient of the 2014 Hearts of Gold Award for volunteering.
 
Debbie Smart John Supplitt is the senior director of constituency sections for the American Hospital Association. He has 25 years of experience with staffing of and participating on national non-profit boards and panels. Supplitt has a Bachelor of Science from Georgetown University and master’s degrees in public administration from New York University and business administration from Loyola University of Chicago.
 
Debbie Smart Christine C. Tangney is a professor in clinical nutrition and Associate Dean for Research for the College of Health Sciences at Rush University Medical Center. She is involved with the American Cancer Society, and provides lectures and demonstrations about healthy eating and cooking to cancer survivors. She has been a speaker for the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women program. Tangney was elected to a four-year unfilled term. 
 
Debbie Smart Marianthi Thanapoulos is the community engagement liaison for the Village of Mount Prospect. She is the president of Tharos Productions, a local not-for-profit. She is a past member of Women in Film and has volunteered for Big Brothers Big Sisters. She is a member of the PTA and has presented at the University of Chicago. Thanapoulos was first appointed in August of 2016 and served on the Finance and Human Resources Committees of the Board of Library Trustees.
 
 


 
How do people flourish in the second half of life? That was the central question explored in an insightful presentation by New York Times bestselling author Barbara Bradley Hagerty, on Friday, May 12 at the library. More than a 100 people gathered in the Hendrickson Room to hear the award-winning journalist for NPR speak about the challenges and opportunities of midlife featured in her most recent book, Life Reimagined:The Science, Art and Opportunity of Midlife. Sharing extensive research on how people think, feel and react in their 40s, 50s and 60s, coupled with her own life experiences, Hagerty invited the audience to "take an inventory of your life" reminding them "midlife is not a dress rehearsal. You are halfway through your life."
 
Hagerty cited friendships and the ability to revise expectations as two key clues to flourishing in midlife and beyond. Following her 60-minute presentation, Hagerty engaged in a lively audience Q&A. Here is a snapshot of some of the ideas shared:
 
People who thrive in midlife take the good and the bad.
 
People who flourish let go of what they haven't achieved and focus instead on what they have achieved.
 
Friends allow us to offload our stress.
 
Call up an old friend. Make a new one.
 
Happy people develop what I call a little purpose....a little purpose brings joy and pushes you out of your comfort zone.
 
Take an inventory of your life. What are the relationships, what at the activities, what are the little purposes worth investing in.
 
Pick those things, relationships, purposeful activities and truly engage in them, don't let them go on autopilot. 
 
Making the Most of Midlife: The Conversation Continues
If you’re feeling inspired by the ideas in Life Reimagined, we welcome you to join in a community conversation. Discuss your own midlife experience and share ideas with others about how to get the most out of this exciting time. Reading the book ahead of time is not required, but is encouraged.

Date and time: Thursday, May 18, 7–8:30 p.m.
Location: Hendrickson Room
Register


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6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy