What's Up at the Library?

 
Wednesday, May 11 was "pitch night" for more than 40 John Hersey High School student entrepreneurs who took center stage at the library to compete in a Shark Tank-style showdown. In all, eight groups of students presented, each giving their best pitches for new businesses and start-up opportunities before a panel of five judges, including Mayor Tom Hayes, and an audience of more than 100 people.
 
Start-up ideas ranged from Campus View, a virtual college campus tour website, to Mass Meals, a subscription-based meal delivery service. Other ideas included an online gift buying service named Trendit  and a resale service for homecoming and prom dresses called Dress Again.
 
In the end, the winning idea was GoFur, a business described as "the bridge that connects young and eager adults to local residents needing help with their errands."  GoFur was created by student entrepreneurs Mitch Carlisle, Javin Maestro, David Fernquist, Spencer Krueger, Jake Kramarczyk and Carsen Anderson.
 
The presentations capped off nine months of hard work in an innovative class titled Entrepreneurship. Taught by Dan Vesper, a business education teacher at Hersey, the class combined a dynamic new curriculum from INCubatoredu with hands-on learning, guest presenters and mentoring by more than 35 area businesses and professionals.
 
"The kids were very prepared, composed, professional and so creative," says Shannon Distel, the library's Business and Specialty Services Manager who presented to the students earlier in the school year. "The whole idea was for the students to identify a problem and come up with a solution. It was impressive to see the results, and I could tell they had used some library resources."
 
GoFur moves on to compete in the District 214 Pitch Night to be held at Forest View Educational Center on Tuesday, May 17, 6:30 p.m.  Student entrepreneurs from across the district will compete for top honors and a cash prize.
 


Adults
 
Launchpads Take Off in Kids’ World
 
New Launchpad learning tablets are now available for check-out in Kids’ World. Each tablet is pre-loaded with learning games for children. Search “launchpad” at ahml.info to see available tablets and games or look for them in the STEM area in Kids’ World.



What better way to learn about writing, theater and the creative process than to meet a bestselling author. That's what happened for close to 200 District 214 students who had the opportunity to meet Gregory Maguire, creator of Wicked:The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, on Wednesday, March 9 during the author's library-sponsored visit to Arlington Heights. 
 
Maguire spoke with students, many from the theater, English and creative writing classes, at Rolling Meadows High School and shared with them his experiences as a young boy who spent a lot of time at his local library to his unexpected rise to fame with the publication of Wicked. Maguire spoke candidly for about 45 minutes and then answered questions from the students during a lively Q&A.
 
Rolling Meadows High School was the first stop on the author's day-long appearance which was in celebration of Once Upon a Time...Exploring the World of Fairy Tales, a play exhibit currently underway at the library. Maguire will speak to an audience at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre beginning at 7 p.m.

 



 
"Fairy tales were and still are comfort reading to me," said Gregory Maguire, New York Times bestselling author of Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West during a special library-sponsored appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Wednesday evening, March 9. 
 
More than 200 people turned out to hear Maguire deliver a lively 75-minute exploration of creativity and storytelling titled, "No Rest for the Wicked: On Reading and Writing Fantasy....and the Magic of Broadway." 
 
"Life itself is the most wonderful of fairy tales," began Maguire by quoting one of his favorite fairy tale authors, Hans Christian Andersen. From there Maguire candidly shared his story of a tough childhood in Albany, New York, "All the fairy tales I came across as a child seemed to be secret biographies of me." With equal parts wit and wisdom, Maguire took the audience on an intimate journey by projecting family photographs and images of his earliest stories already filled with adventure and fantasy. "I wrote more than 100 stories between fourth and tenth grade. I'd finish one and say that was fun, let's do it again."
 
That same enthusiasm continues today. Maguire has published 38 books including his latest novel, After Alice, a new twist on the Lewis Carroll classic Alice in Wonderland.
 
Since its publication in 1995, Wicked has sold five million copies and became the basis for the smash hit Tony-award winning Broadway musical. Maguire showed the audience the original draft of the award-winning novel, a handwritten manuscript. "Look, it's pen, paper, I'm using notebooks. I'm still writing much like I did in fourth grade."
 
Following his animated presentation, Maguire took questions from the audience and shared insights on his writing process.
 
"All of my stories begin with a moral or intellectual question like what is evil and where does it come from or what is beauty," said Maguire.
 
The evening ended with a book signing and meet and greet with the author in the lobby of the Metropolis.


Adults
 
The library continued its celebration of all things fairy tale by welcoming tween fairy tale author Liesl Shurtliff to the library on February 25. Shurtliff, the author of Rump: The True Story of Rumpelstiltskin and Jack: The True Story of Jack and the Beanstalk, talked with a group of more than 150 fairy tale fans about myths and legends, where they come from, how they change and what they mean to us today. More than 40 tweens joined Shurtliff for a writing workshop earlier in the day for fourth- to sixth-grade students.
 
Please join us for an upcoming fairy-tale themed program or visit Kids’ World's Once Upon a Time…Exploring the World of Fairy Tales interactive play exhibit for children ages 3 to 10 that runs through March 26. The exhibit is made possible by a gift from the Friends of the Library. To learn more about the Once Upon a Time exhibit and fairy tale programs for all ages, including family movie screenings nights, puppet shows and plays, book discussions, crafts and more, visit ahml.info/fairytales.


 
The library celebrated all things Harry Potter on Thursday, February 4, with an evening of fun fit for a wizard. Wearing costumes and signature Harry styles, participants soaked in the magic and rolled up their sleeves for Hogwarts-themed activities in the Marketplace and The Hub: Harry Potter Bingo, O.W.L. Trivia, Jumping Frog Origami, a Design a Patronus activity and a costume drawing. Participants visited the Sorting Hat to show their House Pride and stopped by Ollivanders to pick out a wand and the latest edition of the Quibbler. Wizards and Muggles alike enjoyed Harry Potter-inspired treats.

The library's annual Harry Potter Book Night, now in its second year, honors J.K. Rowling’s unforgettable stories and the magic of Harry Potter.



Adults, Family
 
Thank you to all of our wonderful customers, staff and community groups, 558 books were donated for children and teens for Wheeling Township’s Adopt-a-Family program. Special thanks go to library staff, the Rolling Green Nine-Hole Golf League and Chamber of Commerce Professional Women’s Council. Teen books were identified as a particular need this year, and Arlington Heights answered our call for materials needed for a broader age of readers, with many titles donated for teens and tweens. Since starting the holiday book drive in 1998, the library has donated 15,031 books to children in need. Thank you for helping provide the gift of literacy in our community during the holidays!


 
Thanks to generosity of the Friends of the Library, programs in the Hendrickson Room are now much clearer for those with hearing aids and cochlear implants. An audio loop system has been installed that sends electromagnetic signals to a tiny receiver already in most hearing aids and cochlear implants. It allows people who use them to hear sounds directly from the AV system. This reduces or cuts out background noise making it much easier to hear. To use the system, attendees need only set their hearing aids to the T (telecoil) setting.
 
In addition to the audio loop system, the library offers a number of other assistive devices.


 
For the eighth consecutive time, Arlington Heights Memorial Library has received a five-star rating in Library Journal's national rating of public libraries. Five stars is the highest rating that a library can receive. Star ratings are based on the annual number of library visits, circulation, program attendance and public Internet computer use.
 
 In 2015, 7,663 U.S. public libraries —more than ever before—were scored on the Library Journal Index of Public Library Service. Nationally, 261 libraries earned a three, four or five-star status including 19 in Illinois. Out of these 19 libraries, Arlington Heights Memorial Library was one of just five public libraries in the state to earn a top five-star rating.

This is an honor for not only our staff and the Library Board of Trustees, but also for you, our customers. Thank you for making us a five-star library once again. See Library Journal's 2015 index of America's Star Libraries.



 
"I think I'm still a short storyteller at heart," author Cristina Henríquez told an audience of 200+ during an appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Thursday evening, November 12. Cristina spoke about her novel, The Book of Unknown Americans, which was chosen as the 2015 One Book, One Village selection by the library. In an interview-style program moderated by Info Services Librarian Mike Monahan, Cristina spoke candidly about her book which she originally wrote as a short story before expanding - a task which took five years to complete and tells the story of two families who have immigrated to the United States from Latin America and their neighbors living in a Delaware apartment complex.
 
"The second you hear someone's story, or imagine their story, it becomes so much harder to be intolerant," she said. "One of the goals of the book was to keep poking at stereotypes."
 
Following the 50-minute conversation on-stage, the author fielded questions from the audience which included sharing insights on the editing and publishing process.

Earlier in the program when asked to describe the meaning of home, Henríquez responded, "Home is not a place. To me, home is a feeling. It's that feeling when your soul sighs."

The Metropolis event capped off a day-long exchange between the author and the Arlington Heights community about The Book Unknown Americans. Earlier at the library, she did a short reading from the novel for an audience in the Cardinal Room and met in the Hub with more than 80 students from three District 214 schools.

 


 
District 214 students meet One Book, One Village author in the Hub
 
What better way to learn about a book than to meet its author. That's what happened for more than 80 high school students who had the opportunity to meet Cristina Henríquez, author of The Book of Unknown Americans, during her November 12 visit to Arlington Heights and the library for One Book, One Village. 
 
The students gathered in the Hub from three schools - John Hersey High School, Rolling Meadows High School and District 214's Newcomer Center - and spent more than an hour with Cristina asking questions about the book, its characters and what it takes to be an author.
 
"It took me five years to write this book and there were days when it really was a struggle and I wondered if I'd ever finish it," she told the students. Henríquez later added, "The best thing you can do for your writing is to forget that anyone is ever going to read it and just write."
 
 
 


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6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy