What's Up at the Library?


Finding a job was job one for the more than 400 local teens who turned out in record numbers on Tuesday evening, February 6 at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library for the Sixth Annual Teen Job Fair. Organized by the Arlington Heights' Youth Commission and presented in partnership with the library, the fair featured 26 area businesses and organizations -- the most ever for this high school student-focused gathering. The annual event offers students a convenient one-stop resource for finding part-time employment for the weekends and after-school or for landing a summer job or volunteer experience.
 
"I like how everything is right here in the same room rather than trying to figure it all out online," said Arlington Heights teen Stephanie Leigh, who came to the fair to scout out job opportunities for the summer along with her friend, Leah Chacko. Both teens are freshmen at Rolling Meadows High School.
 
"I've really enjoyed just going around," Chacko added. "It's been easier to get to know each job and the different aspects to them in person. Everyone has been really nice."
 
The two-hour fair took place in the Hendrickson Room where each business showcased their brand with banners, handouts detailing hiring criteria and information on hours and pay rate, plus staff on-hand eager to answer questions and offer assistance on how to best navigate the online application and interview process.
 
"We hire a lot of seasonal positions for guest services and this has been a good way to reach potential employees," said Megan Brandt, human resources assistant at Arlington Park International Racecourse. Brandt estimated that in the first 45 minutes of the fair she had already talked to about 25 teens looking for summer work. "It's also nice to see a lot of parents here tonight. For us, it's a good place to build awareness and to remind people that we're here."
 
Businesses and Organizations that Participated in the Job Fair:
 
Arlington Heights Memorial Library
Arlington Heights Park District
Arlington Heights School District 25
Arlington International Racecourse
Church Creek
Culver's of Buffalo Grove
Frontier Days (volunteer opportunities)
Garabaldi's
High School District 214 (internship opportunities)
Home Depot
Jeff Ellis Management, LLC
Jewel Osco Arlington Heights Road
Jewel Osco- Vail Street
Let It Snow, Make It Go - Village of Arlington Heights Teen Snow Shoveling Program
Lutheran Home
Mariano's Fresh Market
Met2Plastic, LLC
Northwest Community Healthcare
Northwest Electrical Supply
Northwest Special Recreation Association (NWSRA)
Rolling Meadows Park District
Soccer City - Lil Kickers NWI & Skilz Academny
SportsKids Inc.
The Student Conservation Association
Transitional Care of Arlington Heights
Wheeling Park District


Adults, Jobs, Teen
 
AHML is ready for the snow! We have snow brushes available for check out. They are on the rack with the umbrellas near the Express Reserve shelves. Like the umbrellas, the loan period is one week.  


 
If you missed the library's annual Readers’ Party and are looking for your next winter read, here is a recap of staff recommendations:
 
Something Like Happy by Eva Wood
Recommended by Sherri T, Readers Advisory
 
Coming to my Senses by Alice Waters
Recommended by Joan L, Readers Advisory
 
Unforgettable: The Bold Flavors of Paula Wolfert’s Renegade Life by Emily Kaiser Thelin
Recommended by Katie M, Senior Services
 
River of Consciousness by Oliver Sacks
Recommended by Barb W, Senior Services
 
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
Recommended by Pam S, Readers Advisory
 
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Recommended by Julie J, School Services
 
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Recommended by Alice S, Teen Services
 

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
Recommended by Sonya H, Teen Services

 
Find more Staff Picks here
 
Want recommendations on what to read next? Complete our Book Me form and our librarians will provide a list of recommended books for you to try.
 
 


 
Close to 500 people stopped by the library on Saturday evening to get a first look at the library’s newest traveling exhibit, XOXO: An Exhibit About Love & Forgiveness.
 
The opening night party filled the Marketplace and Kids’ World and gave partygoers of all ages the opportunity to explore the power of feelings with many family-friendly activities.
 
“It’s nice to see so many different families. So many different ages, so many different faces,” said Sheila Whiteside, who came to the party with her husband and two children. “I think [the exhibit] reminds us to come back to the basics. It reminds us of what is really important. My kids are smiling and we’re happy.”
 
The main attraction of the night was the debut of XOXO. Families couldn’t get enough of exploring the different parts of this hands-on exhibit. Some popular activities included Holding Hands, which allows people to hold hands to get a memorable quote to appear; Talk to Someone, where families can communicate with one another using telephones set up in the library; and Release the Negative, an activity where participants can write down negative feelings and send them into a paper shredder.
 
“There’s a lot of things you can do here with people that you love and care about,” said nine-year-old Kanon Koshino as she got ready to send a photo she drew of a thunderstorm into Release the Negative’s paper shredder. “You can show how you feel angry, sad and happy.”
 
Attendees also visited the Hub for button making and yarn art activities, the Training Center for a virtual Google Expedition to Paris and Kids’ World for a scavenger hunt, storytimes and arts and crafts.
 
Another highlight of the evening that impressed partygoers was an hour-long performance from Istvan & His Imaginary Band that kept children engaged with bubbles, tambourines and fun music. Istvan performed in the Hendrickson Room to an enthusiastic crowd, which included Tracy Brooks and her three children.
 
“[XOXO] is great, it’s keeping the kids active and giving them unique things to see and touch,” Brooks said. “I like that [Istvan & His Imaginary Band] passed out tambourines, they got to feel and touch their own instruments.”
 

Visit XOXO: An Exhibit About Love & Forgiveness during regular library hours from now to Saturday, March 31 in Kids’ World and the Marketplace. This exhibit was created by the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh with support from The Fetzer Institute and is made possible by the generous support of the Friends of the Library.

 




Looking for preschool or childcare information? Choosing the right preschool or childcare that fits your family’s needs is a big job. Whether you’re looking for all day childcare or a preschool, we can help.

Every January, the Arlington Heights Memorial Library hosts a Preschool and Childcare Information Night. Directors and teachers from Arlington Heights, as well as surrounding areas, gather to share information about their programs. Some even have summer camp options for school age children.
 
This year, we had 41 different facilities participate in our open house. If you were unable to join us, we have pamphlets and brochures from all the participants. Stop by the Kids’ World desk anytime to take a look at the Preschool and Childcare Information binder.


 
Close to 100 Arlington Heights residents and students from the High School District 214 Newcomer Center experienced the art of community service on Monday, January 15 by working together at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library to create a large three-panel mural honoring the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Under the guidance of renowned local artist Gino Savarino, participants of all ages gathered in the library’s Cardinal Room to paint during one of the three 90-minute sessions.
 
“It’s like a giant coloring book, just paint and stay in the lines,” said Savarino as he welcomed participants. “I’ll be there to guide you every step of the way.”
 
Throughout the day, participants took turns applying bright swaths of color and painted side-by-side, filling in the canvases that were designed by Savarino to convey a pop art feel and include images that reflect Dr. King’s legacy and symbols of Arlington Heights. 
 
“The goal was to provide an opportunity for the community to come together to honor Dr. King’s legacy and to work together to create something that will be a lasting legacy,” said Angela Jones, the library’s Community Engagement Liaison.
 
Among the participants were 25 students from the Newcomer Center, District 214’s facility that prepares students who are new to the United States to successfully transition to their home high schools. The students, both current and former, represented five countries.
 
“What are your dreams for the future?” asked Newcomer Center Coordinator Mario Perez to the students and residents who gathered. Perez, one of the event organizers, encouraged students and residents to share personal experiences and family stories of immigration in small group discussions between painting sessions.
 
“Being able to participate in something where you are part of the whole is so important,” said Arlington Heights resident Julie Kurka, who brought her 11-year-old sixth-grader to the library to paint on her day off of school. “Rather than just doing for yourself, it’s nice to do more and give back.”
 
The completed mural was on display in the library during February and will eventually be permanently hung at the Newcomer Center, which is housed at the Forest View Educational Center in Arlington Heights. The event organizers plan to bring the mural to local schools and other community locations in the coming months. Watch the video below to see the mural coming together. 
 
 


 
Wings of hope took flight this fall as young visitors to the library and students in Cape Town, South Africa exchanged messages of peace by creating and trading origami paper cranes in a global initiative known as the Peace Crane Project. The cultural exchange aims to connect children from around the world through the arts and promote peace and understanding.
 
For library visitors, the experience began in September when a DIY drop-in art station was set up in Kids’ World, which provided the supplies needed to fold a paper crane or dove. While creating their origami, children were invited to make a peace pledge that stated, “Each crane I fold encloses a thought, a hope, a wish representing my commitment to peace.” Some 50 paper cranes were collected at the library and then mailed to the Loreto Primary School more than 8,000 miles away in Cape Town.
 
There, students had also created origami cranes – destined for the Arlington Heights Memorial Library! On International Peace Day, their teacher emailed the library, “We send messages of peace from our small seaside town at the southernmost tip of Africa. We are thankful to have an opportunity to reach out in solidarity with our brothers and sisters around the globe.”
 
The paper cranes arrived at the library from South Africa in late October. Most came with handwritten messages of peace for their friends in Arlington Heights:

“Peace is the way of living life.”
“Peace is not bought it’s given.”
“Be the change you wish to see in the world.”

The Cape Town peace cranes were on display in December 2017 at the library.

 


Adults
 
Free mentoring and small business resources provided by SCORE Chicago (Counselors to America’s Small Business) will be offered at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library beginning in January 2018.

Local small business owners and entrepreneurs are encouraged to take advantage of free mentoring resources for improving the life of their business.

Mentoring services will be available at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library by appointment only on the first Thursday of each month starting on January 4 (three, one-hour sessions at 9 a.m.,10 a.m. and 11 a.m. are available) in the library’s Business Conference Room 172.  Request a one-hour meeting at https://chicago.score.org/branch/arlington-heights-library

Through this new partnership, SCORE Chicago’s highly experienced and trained business counselors (current and retired business owners and executives) will provide complementary and confidential mentoring sessions.
 
The national SCORE Association is a not-for-profit organization with 320 plus chapters and 11,000 plus volunteer mentors throughout the United States. Since 1964, SCORE on a national level has helped more than 10 million aspiring entrepreneurs.
 
For more information, contact Diane Malik, Specialty Info Services Advisor, 847-870-2458 or dmalik@ahml.info


Adults, business
 
Thank you to all of our wonderful customers, staff and community groups who helped contribute to the Arlington Heights Memorial Library's Holiday Book Drive throughout the past few weeks. 770 books were generously donated for infants, children and teens for Wheeling Township's Adopt-a-Family program. Special thanks go to library staff and volunteers, the Board of Library Trustees members, the Lakeshore Circle Book Club, the Rolling Green Nine-Hole Golf League and Girl Scout Troop 40792. The library has donated 17,132 books to children and teens in need since it introduced the Holiday Book Drive in 1998. Thank you again for helping provide the gift of literacy in our community during the holidays.



For the tenth consecutive year, Arlington Heights Memorial Library (AHML) has received a five-star rating in Library Journal's national rating of public libraries. Five stars is the highest rating that a library can receive. Over the ten editions of LJ's ranking of Star Libraries, 606 libraries have been named Star Libraries in one or more years. A total of 69 libraries received stars in each of the ten rankings. Of those, AHML is one of only 13 public libraries nationwide to have earned a five-star rating each and every year.
 
“We continue to remain strong in library visits, circulation and program attendance. We attribute this to exceptional staff and an engaged community that strongly support the library,” said Mike Driskell, Acting Executive Director. “This award is really about being in tune with our community and providing the services that they want, when they want them. Responsive change to align services with needs is key to receiving this award year after year. Our mission is to focus completely on the community to identify the services and programs that our residents need and do whatever we can to make them happen.”

This year, 7,409 U.S. public libraries qualified to be rated in the Index. In this edition, there are 259 Star Libraries, each receiving three-star, four-star or five-star designations.Twenty two libraries in Illinois have been named Star Libraries for 2017, and out of these, AHML is just one of six public libraries in the state to earn a top five-star rating. Read more here.


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6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy