What's Up at the Library?

NewsBlogSummerReading
 

Kids' World manager Yvette Johnson reports that 5,000 kids registered in this summer's reading program at the Library. Another 215 middle school students served as junior library volunteers (JLVs) and contributed 2,239 hours of service assisting with the summer reading activities and with the Library's July 4 Parade float.

Summer reading programs began in the 1890s as a way to encourage school children, particularly those in urban areas and not needed for farm work, to read during their summer vacation, use the library, and develop the habit of reading.

 "The benefits to young readers participating in a summer reading program are lasting," says Paula Moore, Executive Director at the Library. Reading over the summer helps children keep their skills up, encourages family fun, and can generate interest in reading as a lifelong habit through games, events, and skill-building activities coordinated by the Kids' World staff and volunteers.

Also instrumental to the Library's summer reading program success are the Friends of the Library. The Friends contributed funds for t-shirts, Arlington Theater gift certificates, and a wrap-up pizza party for the JLVs. The Friends generate funds through their quarterly used book sales to support items like summer reading incentives, that are not included in the Library's annual operating budget. The Friends' next sale is their Fantastic Fall Sale on the weekend of October 30-31 at the Library.   More information about the Friends and their sales.



5star3rdTime (2)

For the third year in a row,  the Arlington Heights Memorial Library has received a five-star rating in Library Journal's national rating of public libraries, the LJ Index of Public Library Service 2010.  Five stars is the highest rating that a library can receive. Only 85 libraries across the country received this rating which is based on the annual number of library visits, circulation, program attendance and public Internet computer use. 

More than ever in these difficult economic times, people realize the value of their libraries. Our annual circulation is at an all-time high, and free programs, like our job seekers programs, money talks and cultural programs, have filled our meeting rooms with capacity crowds. We greatly appreciate the support of our community!

Food Drive's are awesome!


The big smiles on the faces of young and old as they walked through the doors of the Hendrickson Room for last weekend's LEGO train exhibit said it all. The exhibit, which drew 2,763 attendees, was a crowd pleaser for all ages. The attendance was 5% higher than in 2008 - the last time the train exhibit was here. The exhibit was put together by Northern Illinois LEGO Train Club members. Our next family event is Astronomy Night on Friday, October 15, at 7 p.m. in the Hendrickson Room. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Labs Solar System Ambassador Jim Kovac will present “Exoplanets: Worlds Beyond Our Solar System.” Then everyone is invited to go outside to the parking lot to look through powerful telescopes set up by members of the Northwest Suburban Astronomers Club. It's all free, and there's no registration.


ReadFeed_blog Once again the Library is sponsoring a “Read & Feed” food drive. It will run from September 1–December 1 at the Library and on the bookmobile to collect food pantry items for the Wheeling Township food pantry. The “Read & Feed” drive will also accept items for The Buddy Foundation to care for stray, abused and abandoned animals. Food donations can include unopened and unexpired cans or boxes of: • rice • dry beans/peas • meats • stews • soup • peanut butter • cereal • pasta • macaroni & cheese • fruits • vegetables • powdered or evaporated milk • pancake mix • jelly • paper goods - paper towels, toilet paper, napkins, household cleaning products, and diapers sizes 4, 5 and 6. Pet items to donate include: • dog food - canned or dry • dog treats • cat food - canned or dry • cat treats • scoopable cat litter. For more information about items to donate to the “Read & Feed” collection, please call 847-506-2613.


NewsBlogSummerReading Kids' World manager Yvette Johnson reports that 5,000 kids registered in this summer's reading program at the Library. Another 215 middle school students served as junior library volunteers (JLVs) and contributed 2,239 hours of service assisting with the summer reading activities and with the Library's July 4 Parade float. Summer reading programs began in the 1890s as a way to encourage school children, particularly those in urban areas and not needed for farm work, to read during their summer vacation, use the library, and develop the habit of reading.  "The benefits to young readers participating in a summer reading program are lasting," says Paula Moore, Executive Director at the Library. Reading over the summer helps children keep their skills up, encourages family fun, and can generate interest in reading as a lifelong habit through games, events, and skill-building activities coordinated by the Kids' World staff and volunteers. Also instrumental to the Library's summer reading program success are the Friends of the Library. The Friends contributed funds for t-shirts, Arlington Theater gift certificates, and a wrap-up pizza party for the JLVs. The Friends generate funds through their quarterly used book sales to support items like summer reading incentives, that are not included in the Library's annual operating budget. The Friends' next sale is their Fantastic Fall Sale on the weekend of October 30-31 at the Library.   More information about the Friends and their sales.

If you didn't attend this year's Teen Film Fest, you can see the winning videos on our TeenSpace web page. There were 13 great entries judged by Daily Herald film critic Dann Gire. The three winning films were:  First place -  The Beatrix Gem directed by Ben M. of Arlington Heights Second place - Walking On Air directed by Ashley G. of Arlington Heights
Third place - Jenga directed by Trevor O. of Kildeer.


language_lineUsing the Library can be daunting for those with limited English skills. To make things easier, the Library has instant access to an interpreter through a Language Line telephone located at the Answer Center. The phone connects patrons with an interpreter who can translate their requests and convey them to a staff member. The Language Line service has professional interpreters for 150 languages, and it is available any time the Library is open.

kw_reorganization Please pardon our dust during our Kids’ World reorganization project. We’re moving things around, replacing the carpet and adding a few more surprises to the area. All kids'’ items will be available during this project, but some are in temporary locations. Look for the following items in the area between New Books and DVDs for adults: Pop-Up Books Board books Picture books EReads J/Y fiction, mysteries and science fiction Kids' World reference World Languages All items will be moved back to their new locations in Kids' World by October 8. If you need assistance locating anything, please ask a staff member.

Every day around 2,200 people visit our Library. They come here to look for jobs, get help for their small businesses, check out books, movies, music and magazines, learn to use technology, ask questions and do research, attend programs and much more. Our library one of 16,600 public libraries in the United States. Click here to learn a few of the ways that public libraries stack up and how they are helping meet the critical needs of our communities.

Email Updates

Sign up to r​eceive our e-newsletters
 
  • Upcoming programs
  • Book recommendations
  • Literacy services for growing readers
  • Classes for local business owners

Library Newsletter

 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy