Posted by Trixie on 07.23.13

On Friday, we 3D scanned, modeled, and printed portraits for 16 teens in the library's Marketplace. Don't know much about 3D printing? Basically, a digital model can be "printed" into a three-dimensional, solid object using this technology. Here's an infographic and a video that explains the process.
 
Jesse DePinto from Voxel Metric, Inc. was here to scan and 3D model the participants' heads. Check out the gallery of 3D models - you can get a 360° view of the busts that were printed!
 
 
Andrew Morrison from Workshop 88 joined us to demo his Makerbot Replicator 2 and 3D print the portraits.
 
AHML's own resident maker Chris Krueger (aka The New Hobbyist) showed off some of his prints and answered audience questions too!
 
Below is a video recap of the program. You can check out more video and photos from the program on the Digifii website.
 
DIY




Posted by amypelman on 07.21.13

 
 
Bookapalooza last Friday was really fun!  It was a 2-part program.  "Book Speed Dating" and a book discussion of The Fifth Wave by Rick Yancey.   
 
What is Book Speed Dating you ask?  Well, let me explain!  14 books were completely covered and taped shut, and a photocopy of the first chapter was stapled to the front.  After reading each one, teens rated the book on their score sheets that looked like this: 
 
 
At the end, everyone chose their highest rated books and got to unwrap them!  First, though, we needed sustenance (in the form of pizza and cookies): 
 
 
Their "dates" waited patiently on the table! 
 
 
Speed-dating books is serious business:
 
 
But the reveal is very exciting! 
 
 
And, of course, we had a lot of fun discussing The Fifth Wave.  Most everyone in attendance was pretty passionate about the book, and we are all anxiously awaiting the next book in the series.  To kick off our discussion, we watched the trailer for the book: 
 
Bookapalooza was so much fun, we had requests to do it again!  I think that can be arranged.  Stay tuned!  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Programs




Posted by Trixie on 07.18.13

If you haven't noticed, we make a lot of things in the Hub. From Shrinky Dinks to LED flashlights, you can always find a fun project to work on while you're visiting. There is even some making that you may overlook while you're here. Silvio, a regular Hub visitor, is an avid writer. Often, you can find him hanging out in the Hub typing away on a computer or writing poetry on a campfire drawing table. He uses the Hub as a place to express his creativity through writing short stories or poetry. For those that haven't read his short story "Brother and Sister" (excerpt below), come by and check it out. It is featured on the Hub cork board.
His blue eyes penetrated her with a glee of anger, frustration and remorse. As the wind uncombed his dark red hair, now turning pitch black, Roger sat loosely, positioned on the back of his chair, focusing his gaze upon her. She was a charming young woman, with a sheepish smile, long flowing black hair, smooth thin rose lips, and sea blue eyes.

Yet now she was different, her posture erect, her hands firm around the chair's back. She was returning to the formal posture of the soldier, yet even that could not appease her brother's mood.
He just kept staring at her with hawk eyes, first at her soul and then at her body. He was judge, prosecutor, and witness at the same time, but he still had wanted to meet her alone, only as her brother, not as her military and social superior.

Yet just because he had relieved the guards of their duty, the tensions were still high, and not in any sense calming down.

'You know that I know.' His eyes would say, yet he also told 'I still plan to keep this a secret.'
 
Eventually she could not stand the pressure any longer, so she sat down and awaited her brother's typhoon of anger to strike, but he was patient.

Roger would vent his anger slowly, like a poisonous snake. He would be cold, and precise and powerful. His face was already pale, his hands were fists, and he wore panoply except for his helmet.
Piqued your interest? Read more online or in the Hub.
 




Posted by alice on 07.16.13

First things first, watch the video below!
 
 
Did you ever think you'd be scared of Mary Poppins?  I mean, I guess she does make the Banks children eat gross tasting medicine (which is a scary prospect for anyone), but she usually follows that with a spoon full of sugar.  The Mary Poppins in the video above doesn't seem like the type to be sweet nor sweeten.
 
At Cut and Re-Cut, a program we had in the Training Center last Thursday, teens came in and created their own re-cut trailers for popular movies.  They had the choice between making Monsters Inc. into a horror movie or The Hunger Games into a rom-com.  Using some iMovie know-how, appropriate clips/music for our purposes, and SERIOUS creativity, the teens delivered great trailers!
 
You can view them in the playlist below!
 

 
Also, remember to check out our programs calendar for more awesome programs in the future!
 




Posted by amypelman on 07.16.13

 
What do all your t-shirts, cool canvas bags, and concert posters have in common?  The images most likely got on all those things using the method known as screen printing (sometimes also called silk screen).  This is a technique where the printer pushes ink through a mesh screen onto the fabric or paper. An image is exposed onto the screen (or is placed underneath it) creating a stencil that can be used over and over again.  Last Friday the ink was flying in the D.I.Y. space in The Hub.  First teens tried their hand at printing posters using a pre-made screen with the Hub logo on it.  We got perfect prints, reading for framing! Then everyone designed their very own simple paper stencil to print.  Great artwork and a fun time was had by all! 
 
 
Interested in trying your hand at screen printing?  Since we have these great screens in The Hub, we will definitely be offering more opportunities to come in and try it.  In the meantime, there are kits you can buy to do screen printing at home.  Here is a nice overview of the process:
 
The screen printing program kicked off our very own version of Google+ Maker Camp!  Stop on by the Hub to pick up a pin and some stickers and sign-up to try out something interesting like "squishy circuits" and soldering a blinky robot pin!  
 
DIY




Posted by alice on 07.12.13

I had to hijack Alice's account to share the following with all you teen readers out there:
 
Have you ever found yourself searching for the perfect word...and the word just doesn't exist? Especially when talking about books and your reading experiences? Kudos to YALSA Hub blogger Joel Bruns, whose list of YA lit vocab made me laugh but also nod my head and say "yep." Check these out (and start dropping them into your conversations with us in the AHML Hub):
 
Catastrafatigue: the feeling that one more catastrophe-riddled future world is more than you can stand
 
Seqhole: the empty feeling you get when you are waiting for the next book in a series to be released
 
Skimulate: pretending you’ve read a book when, in fact, you skimmed the back cover and maybe a few pages from each chapter. Also: bibliofake.
 
Errorist: person incapable of seeing anything but the weaknesses of every book they read
 
Lust Jacket: cover design that is so awesome you just can’t help but pick up the book. Antonym: bust jacket: a cover that makes you go “ewwww.”
 
Melodramamine: the feeling you get after gorging on drama-filled books
 
Supernaturillogical: when a writer endows a character in a book with special powers that are just ridiculous and/or unbelievable and/or just plain stupid
 
Dittopia: oh boy, another book set in a crumbling future America
 
Zombifad: right now
 
Afictionado: no, I don’t want to read your fan fiction of The Hunger Games from the point of view of Prim’s goat
 
Shock and Awwww: when you are dreading a book, read it anyway, and end up loving it
 
Check out Joel Brun's blog post here!
 
-Mary Ellen
 
geekout, wordplay




Posted by alice on 07.09.13

 
Oh my tweet!  We had some great submissions for the Tweet a Tale contest for June.  You ladies and gents did not have much space to write, but you all dared us to read in between the lines and get so much out of just 120 characters!  Kudos to everyone!  BUT... we can only have two winners, folks.
 
Behold... the winning tweets below!  Congrats!
 
For Best Comedy Story
 
For Best Horror Story
 
Want another shot at one of our contests? You're in luck! Check out this Photo Scavenger Hunt that's happening now and win another spectacular prize!
 




Posted by amypelman on 07.08.13

 
This week we have a special review from Joe in the Programs Department.  And guess what?  The author Leslie Stella will be here on August 7th for a book discussion of her recent book, followed by a DIY 'zine workshop.
Sign up here!  Then come to the Hub to pick up your copy of the book!!
 
 
Permanent Record by Leslie Stella
 
Permanent Record is tight, compelling, heartwarming, funny, and credibly set in Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood. Teens will flip for this book. It truly speaks their language, but not through an overuse of slang or idiotic text-speak--it speaks their emotional language. Stella somehow successfully channels the cross-cultural voice of an Iranian-American teenage boy, and the peek inside his head is sure to resonate tremendously with teens (and adults, who were once teens themselves) everywhere. This book unflinchingly takes on some of the heaviest aspects of growing up--feeling like an outsider, struggling to figure out one's place in the world, wrestling with new emotions and maturing relationships, the nature of respect--and deftly presents them with honesty, and even a little hope. 
 
Name:  Joe C.
Department:  Programs
Years at AHML:  almost 1
Favorite thing I do at work: Transform ideas into live programs
Best place to Read my book:  on the train
Why I like reading YA:  It helps me stay connected to what’s happening now for young people
 
 
ITBA




Posted by alice on 07.02.13

 
Who doesn't enjoy receiving a greeting card?  Birthday cards, Get Well cards, Just Sayin' Hello cards... they can all put a smile on the recipient's face.  
 
The greeting cards we created on Saturday at the DIY: LED Greeting Cards program must've put a huge, toothy smile on some special recipient's face then.  We used Bare Paint conductive ink, a battery, LEDs, and some knowledge of circuitry to create greeting cards that light up!
 
Missed the program or need a re-cap?  You can find the instructions on how to create your own LED Greeting Cards below, or, you can purchase a kit from sparkfun.com
 
1. Use the robot templates that come with the kit or create your own design on a blank paper.
2. Cut off a small strip of paper. This will be used for the “switch” later on.
3. Use the push pin to punch holes for the battery and LED prongs.
4. Trace the black lines on the templates (if using the robot drawings) with the Bare Paint pen.
5. WAIT FOR THE INK TO DRY!!!!
6. Place the battery into one of the pairs of holes and the LED into the other. Flatten them out at a 90 degree angle.
7. Make sure that the legs match, long LED leg to long battery leg and the same for the short legs.
8. Remember that strip of paper from step 2?  We’re using it now.  Glue it to the spot shown in the picture. This is how the “circuit” will be completed.
9. Add a blob of ink to the switch and wait for it to dry.
10. To turn it on simply press the switch down to complete the circuit!
 
As always, if you have any questions on this program, feel free to drop by The Hub and ask one of our staff!
 
DIY, DIY, programs




Posted by amypelman on 07.01.13

 
 
Last Saturday these 3 awesome Arlington Heights teens, Tessa, Rosalie, and Elizabeth attended the American Library Association conference in downtown Chicago. There they joined over 50 teens from all different areas to present their opinions on some of the books nominated for the esteemed Best Fiction for Young Adults list.  They stood in front of the microphone and presented their well-thought-out and insightful opinions about books like, The Fifth Wave, Dark TriumphEleanor & Park, and Unremembered, among several others.  All the while publishers, authors, and librarians paid close attention to what they were saying.  Here's Elizabeth standing at the microphone talking about one the books she read:   
 
  
As a fun reward, the girls were treated to a pizza lunch given by the Penguin Publishing House.  They heard an amazing panel of authors speak about their craft and took home gift bags full of books.  Then they got to visit the huge exhibit hall!  
 
A great time was had by all!  If you are interested in getting involved with book club and becoming a Teen Book Reviewer at AHML, let me know!  You can contact me at: apelman@ahml.info