Posted by mkrueger on 11.30.12

This project got a good laugh out of me. It's a security system using a couple of iPhones and an old painting to create the creepy paintings that follow you like in Scooby Doo cartoons. Check out the video of it below!
 
 




Posted by mkrueger on 11.21.12

 
I'm sure any librarian would look at Brian Dettmer's art and think he committed a heinous crime. Brian's art is known for it's alteration of pre-existing media. Old cassette tapes, record albums, however a lot of his work primarily focuses on books.
 
 
While in college Brian worked in a sign shop and began experimenting using torn up news paper, and book pages, by layering the ripped out pieces. This was the beginning of his creation process that sparked the idea for the work he is known for.
 
 
The process begins with choosing an old book, books range from dictionaries, encyclopedias, art books, science books, and a variety of others. The book is sealed and then cutting begins. The cuts are not strategically planned and the exposed portions of the books have never been moved, they remain where they were originally printed.
 
 
I for one love his work, if you too have enjoyed this artist's creations click HERE to see more of his work.
 
 




Posted by mkrueger on 11.16.12

You may have finger painted in kindergarten but this artist has taken it to an insane level. Judith ann Braun is the artist's name and she created this staggering 12 feet x 48 feet landscape using only charcoal and her fingertips. The landscape titled Diamond Dust can be seen at the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk Virginia until January 2013. So if you find yourself out there, go take a look!
 
The piece was done as a live public viewing over the course of a week, and was also broadcast via webcam. Check out the photos below! 
 
 
You can view more of this artist's work at her website by clicking the link here.




Posted by mkrueger on 11.09.12

I came across these images the other day and I knew I had to share. The pictures below show paper art that are all created from the little portions of the paper you see missing in the photos. Take a look at the gallery and be amazed!
 
The work was created by Peter Callesen, if you would like to view more of his work click here.




Posted by mkrueger on 11.05.12

Last month we had a blast! We had a Halloween themed DIY, posted below is a video of the project we made.
 
 
If you'd like to see how and where we got the idea for this project, click here.
 
Interested in what our next DIY is? Click here!
DIY




Posted by mkrueger on 10.19.12

Recently we had comic book author/artist Corinne Mucha come in to discuss her books for Teen Read Week. While she stopped in she also showed everyone how to get started making their own comics with this handy sheet.
 
To see more of Corinne's work click here.
DIY




Posted by mkrueger on 10.17.12

 
 
People never cease to amaze me with their creativity, take this guy here. A man going by the user name Freshpancakes uploaded photos of his fully functional Nintendo controller. You can view a full gallery of the development process below.
 




Posted by mkrueger on 09.28.12

 
Steel frames, titanium frames, cardboard frames? That's right, what you are looking at right now is a picture of a bicycle made primarily from recycled cardboard. The name of the bike is the Alfa. Alfa was invented by Izhar Gafni after he heard of someone building a functional cardboard canoe. The bicycle weighs 20 pounds and costs $9 to $12 to produce! Below is a video of the project idea and the bicycle in motion.
 
 




Posted by tspicer on 09.25.12

Check out what our TEEN ADVISORY BOARD members were up to at a recent meeting!  This is called a '2nd Line March' Jazz Funeral.  We didn't want it to end!
 
TAB




Posted by mkrueger on 09.21.12

 
Artist Miguel Endara created this incredible portrait of his Father, what's so special about it? The portrait is made entirely out of ink dots, 3.2 million ink dots to be exact, using a single pen. The portrait took a total of 210 hours to complete! To our benefit, Endara created a time-lapse video of the creation process. You can watch the video below.