Posted by Trixie on 06.06.13

 
Finals are wrapping up so I think we can officially say that summer is here! Registration began for our Make It summer reading program on Monday and we’ve already had over 50 teens register. Don’t fret – it’s not too late to get registered and start earning stamps on your MakerPad. It’s simple: either come into the Hub and ask one of our awesome teen services staff or register online. Once you have your MakerPad created, you’re ready to start earning stamps. Wondering how you earn stamps? There are five different categories.

MAKER: Register and attend one of our film making, DIY or maker programs.
DIY-ER: Drop in to the Hub and complete one of our Do It Yourself Kits. June’s DIY Kit begins on the 10th. We’ll have 3 different projects throughout the month: Collage Your Favorite Maker, Quick & Easy iPhone/Pod Speaker, and DIY Wax Stamper. We’ll also have designated times (stay tuned for details) where you can take apart an object on our Take Apart Cart.
BOOK REVIEWER: Submit at least three book reviews to ahmlteen@gmail.com.
ONLINE CONNECTOR: Follow us and post something to at least one of our social media accounts – Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or comment on our website. A submission to the Tweet a Tale contest counts for a stamp!
FILMMAKER: Make and submit a film to the 7th Annual Teen Film Fest.

Once you earn 3 stamps, you’ll receive a totally rad finisher stamp on your MakerPad, an extremely odd prize, and be eligible for a $50 gift card to Etsy or Maker Shed. Sounds fun, right? Hope to see you in the Hub this summer!




Posted by Trixie on 05.30.13

 
 
 
Once I had feared that telling the truth would be like falling, that love would be like hitting the ground, but here I was my feet firmly planted, standing on my own.
 
We were all monsters and bastards, and we were all beautiful.
 
 
 
 
 
Rachel Hartman’s Serphina takes place in a world where humans and dragons coexist. Dragons are able to take human form and walk amongst humans. Previously, humans and dragons warred against each other, but they are celebrating 40 years of peace when the novel begins. The nearly four decades of peace has not completely dispelled the uneasiness either species feels regarding the other. Serphina, the main character of the story, finds herself in the middle of a mystery that threatens the very treaty the Royal Court and the leader of dragonkind have gathered to celebrate. Not to mention the danger to her life and exposure of a terrible secret she’s kept her entire life.

A well-written debut novel, this book has it all: action and adventure, mystery, a doomed love story, impeccable fantasy world building, a fearless heroine, and DRAGONS! Hartman weaves a believable, rich page turner. It starts out kind of slow, but persevere. It’s well worth it!
 




Posted by Trixie on 05.30.13

 
Summer is right around the corner! You know what that means: it's almost time for the library summer reading program. As you can tell from the graphic above, this year's theme is Make It: Read. Discover. Create. This summer we have a ton of fun stuff planned. From opportunities to read and write reviews, to "maker" programs and the Volunteer Summer Squad, the Hub has it all! Check out the Mozilla Popcorn Maker video we made to promote the summer reading program below.
 




Posted by Trixie on 05.09.13

 
Last Saturday, May the 4th (be with you), was National Star Wars Day. In celebration, the HUB had a program where we learned about basic circuitry and made jawa figurines with light-up eyes. I promised to post instructions for those that weren't able to finish during the allotted time - threading conductive thread into the eye of a needle is difficult! If you didn't attend and want to make your own jawa with light-up eyes, I modified this build to accommodate budget and length of the program. Please feel free to stop by the HUB if you have any questions or need help with your jawa!
 
  1. Using conductive thread, sew the positive wire. Make sure you are sewing the LEDs on the inside of the figurine.  In the diagram below, it's shown as "+" signs. 
  2. Once your wire is below the battery access slit, attach the battery holder by sewing through the copper positive terminal.
  3. Next, sew the short negative wire, shown as "-" signs and highlighted in the diagram. Begin at the copper negative terminal on the battery holder. The end of the wire should be on the front side of the figurine (opposite the battery holder).
  4. Now, sew one part of the metal snap using the conductive thread. This will serve as the switch for the jawa's eyes.
  5. You will now sew the other negative wire, also shown as "-" signs and highlighted. Begin by sewing the other part of the metal snap switch to the flap on the front of the figurine.
  6. Insert the battery into the holder and test the LEDs to make sure that your circuit is complete and not shorting out.
  7. If the eyes light up, sew most of the jawa body closed around the outer edges of the figurine. Leave a small opening so that you can stuff the figurine with polyfill.
  8. Stuff the jawa and sew the small opening closed.
  9. Put the robe on your jawa. Tape the black construction paper around it's body to hold the robe closed and serve as his equipment belt.
 
 
 
DIY




Posted by Trixie on 05.02.13

Every May, music enthusiasts gather in Memphis for the Beale Street Music Festival part of Memphis in May International Festival, a month-long celebration. This year marks the 37th anniversary of the festival. Residents from all 50 states and visitors from abroad travel to the storied city where rock-n-roll and blues began to celebrate music, both local and international, as well BBQed cuisine. The three day festival is held at Tom Lee Park at the end of Beale Street overlooking the Mississippi River. In addition, events are held throughout the city including the World Championship Barbecue Contest.
 
 
The book display in The Hub this month is a play on the annual celebration. Assuming you can't make it to Memphis, check out a book or DVD with a music theme. Selections include some our recommended list and more.




Posted by Trixie on 04.25.13

 
Today is Ella Fitzgerald's 96th birthday! You may have noticed the tribute on today's Google Doodle (pictured above - click on the picture for a look at how the Doodle was created). For those that don't know, Ella Fitzgerald was an American jazz vocalist. She sold over 40 million albums and won 13 Grammy awards during her lifetime (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996).  Also known as "The First Lady of Song", she's an iconic singer known for her flexible, wide-ranging voice. She sang duets with jazz greats like Duke Ellington, Nat King Cole, and Frank Sinatra to name a few. The year 1934 marked Ella's first on-stage performance at the Apollo's Amateur Night. Over 50 years later, she performed for the last time at Carnegie Hall, her 26th time performing there. If you'd like to learn more about Ella, check out her website. You can also borrow a book, CD, or DVD from our collection
 
Here's one of my favorites performed by Ella.
 
 




Posted by Trixie on 04.20.13

Design: Jessica Helfand
 
April is National Poetry Month! Since 1996, schools, libraries, booksellers, publishers, and individuals have united to bring attention to the art of poetry during this national celebration. This initiative was started and is led by by the Academy of American Poets. The main goal of National Poetry Month is to increase awareness and availability of verse in mainstream culture. Learn more at poets.org. Wondering how you can celebrate? Here's a list of resources to help you get started!
 




Posted by Trixie on 04.10.13

Permanent Record (2013) by Leslie Stella
“I get this feeling that something bad is happening, like I’m going to come home and find our building burned to the ground or white supremacists chasing my family around with baseball bats, or that this bus is going to crash into the bodega on Clark Street. My head won’t stop with this shit. I know it’s all anxiety. It pummels my brain with thoughts and images of horrible things going down. What is the matter with me? I’m sick of talking about myself. I’m sick of thinking about myself. I’m sick of myself.”
 
 
 
Leslie Stella’s Permanent Record tells the story of Badi Hessamizadeh, an Iranian-American teenager exploring his identity and trying to fit in. The story begins with Badi finding out that he will be transferring to Magnificat Academy from Leighton a Chicago public school due to some destructive behavior, a response to constant, post-9/11 bullying he experiences. To make matters worse, his father also legally changes his name to Bud, something “more American,” hoping that this will help him fit in with his new classmates. Bud struggles with being a normal teenager; he feels like an outcast and at times like he is invisible, a nobody. Unable to assimilate and overlook injustices like the archery club being disbanded to make more room for the football team, he takes a stand and openly expresses his opinion. For that, he is plagued with beatings and bullying. He also becomes the prime suspect for mysterious occurrences that begin happening at the school. It is up to him and his new outcast friends to clear his name and get to the bottom of the mystery.
 

Filled with dark and sardonic humor, Permanent Record will have you laughing out loud. Badi/Bud’s first person narration clearly depicts the depression and anxiety experienced by teens trying to find their place in the world. His keen and witty observations of other characters and situations provide a realistic backdrop for the story and mystery that unfolds. For those that loved The Perks of Being a Wallflower, this is a great read for you. You’ll love outcast Badi/Bud and his determination to battling injustice.

 




Posted by Trixie on 04.04.13

Today, at the age of 70, Roger Ebert passed away after a long battle with cancer. Ebert reviewed movies for the Chicago Sun-Times for 46 years and on TV for 31 years. Not only revered and respected in his hometown of Chicago, he was the first critic to win a Pulitzer Prize and be awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He even received a special achievement "Person of the Year" Webby Award in 2010 . Many know him from his and Gene Siskel's show At the Movies. Ebert wrote 17 books in total - not just collections of reviews, but also, a novel and a cookbook! He even wrote a few screenplays.
 
His keen eye, knowledge and wit will certainly be missed by moviegoers. Honor this Illinois native, influential film critic by checking out one of the books he wrote.
 
 
 
Ebert reflects on his life and career in this memoir.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A collection of Ebert's reviews originally published in the Chicago Sun-Times for the past 30 months.
 
 
 
 
 
 
A chronicle of Scorsese's feature films, this book collects eleven interviews of an acclaimed director by a prominent film critic.
 
 
 
 
For more information about Roger Ebert, check out his website.
 




Posted by Trixie on 03.28.13

 
If you're anything like me, you can't get enough of Reese's Peanut Butter Eggs. Instead of dyeing hard boiled eggs for Easter, try making this easy recipe (via chicagoist) for yummy, homemade peanut butter eggs. Everyone will love a delectable, handmade treat in their Easter basket!
 
Ingredients:
4 cups powdered sugar
1 1/2 cups natural peanut butter
1/4 cup butter, melted
3 Tbs 2% milk
3 cups semisweet chocolate chips
2 Tbs butter
 
Directions:
First, combine the powdered sugar, peanut butter, and butter using an electric mixer. Next, slowly add the milk until it becomes a formable dough. Now, you're ready to form the eggs (or any shape - consider using cookie cutters if you want different shapes).
 
Place the formed dough on a wax paper-lined baking sheet and place in the freezer to harden for about a half hour.
 
Once you are ready to dip your dough in chocolate, melt the chocolate chips and 2 tablespoons butter in the microwave, warming and stirring in 30 second increments. 
 
Next, coat each egg with chocolate and place back on the wax lined-baking sheet. Let the eggs set in the freezer or fridge and store in the fridge until you are ready to eat them.
 
Finally, enjoy the fruits of your labor! 
 
DIY