Posts tagged with "Adults"

Posted by daccurso on 12/22/14

Come explore our re-designed digital media lab, the Studio, and get creative.  Interested in making your own movie or music video, or maybe you would like to touch up some old family photos?  Make a reservation for up to two hours at a time or drop in. If you need help with your project, you can make an appointment for one-to-one assistance.  Learn more about the Studio. Funded by the Friends of the Library.
 
Available for Arlington Heights residents ages 12 and older, business cardholders and local high school students.
 
 
 
 

 


Posted by aharder on 03/11/16
 
Do you have old home movies, photos or slides you need digitized? Wish you could record an oral history with a loved one who cannot get to the library’s recording studio? Need better tools to take professional photos of products for your business? With new equipment available from the library’s Studio, you can get creative with video, music, graphic design, digitization, photography and more.
 
New Features:
• Adobe’s Creative Cloud, featuring Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign
• RetroScan, a tool for digitizing 8mm, Super 8mm and 16mm film
• ProTools software for composing, recording, editing and mixing music and soundtracks
• Lighting Cube for product photography
• Recording Kits- bring the Studio home with you
• Wacom Tablet for check-out
• Zoom H4N Handheld Stereo Recorder with Built-in Microphones for check-out
 
Other Studio Equipment:
• Tools for digitizing VHS, cassettes, vinyl, photos, slides and more
• Logic Pro X and Garageband
• iMovie and Final Cut X
• Soundproof booth, electric drum kit and keyboards for recording
• Lighting, backdrops and cameras for video and photography
• GoPro cameras for check-out
 

The Studio is located on the first floor. Schedule a one-on-one appointment to use the Studio or attend an upcoming tech class. Call 847-392-0100 to make a reservation or book online at ahml.info/studio. View tech classes at ahml.info/techclasses. Learn more about the Studio at ahml.info/studio. The Studio is funded by the Friends of the Library.

 

Posted by paichele on 05/09/17
 
Gratitude goes a long way especially when it results from the collective efforts of more 450 volunteers who give of their time and energy for a combined purpose - the library. "With Gratitude" was the theme of this year's Volunteer Recognition Luncheon. Funded by the Friends of the Library, the annual gathering was held on Tuesday, May 9 to show appreciation to the dedicated volunteers who contribute to all areas of the library including Kids' World, the Senior Center, Genealogy, ESL, the Friends of the Library and the bookmobile.  

Executive Director Jason Kuhl welcomed the crowd and presented the volunteer service awards.
 
In 2016, 479 volunteers contributed 29,264 hours of service to the library. Thirty six volunteers received special recognition for achieving Hours of Service milestones beginning at 500 hours and topping off at 15,500 hours of service. Years of service were also recognized and spanned from 3 years to 30 years of service. Carol Egan, a volunteer for the Friends of the Library since 1986, was honored threefold with the President's Lifetime Achievement Award, a 30 Years of Service honor and a 4,000 Hours of Service award.
 
The top honor of the day went to Jane Heaton who was named Volunteer of the Year. This is a one-time award that is given to the volunteer who has contributed the greatest number of hours during the previous year but has not previously received the award. Jane earned Volunteer of the Year for contributing 368 hours of service to the library in 2016 volunteering as an English tutor in the library's ESL office.
 
In the words of one of her students, "My teacher has helped me learn English throughout my journey to citizenship...I have come a long way from the beginning and these classes helped make my daily tasks easier in America....thank you so much."
 

Posted by aharder on 02/05/16
 
The library celebrated all things Harry Potter on Thursday, February 4, with an evening of fun fit for a wizard. Wearing costumes and signature Harry styles, participants soaked in the magic and rolled up their sleeves for Hogwarts-themed activities in the Marketplace and The Hub: Harry Potter Bingo, O.W.L. Trivia, Jumping Frog Origami, a Design a Patronus activity and a costume drawing. Participants visited the Sorting Hat to show their House Pride and stopped by Ollivanders to pick out a wand and the latest edition of the Quibbler. Wizards and Muggles alike enjoyed Harry Potter-inspired treats.

The library's annual Harry Potter Book Night, now in its second year, honors J.K. Rowling’s unforgettable stories and the magic of Harry Potter.


Posted by aharder on 07/31/15

Shared reading is the best way to help babies, toddlers, and preschoolers develop the important early literacy skills they need to learn how to read independently later on. The more books children ages 0–5 hear, the more prepared they will be to learn how to read. It’s never too early to start.
 
1000 Books Before Kindergarten is a reading program for young children. Although 1000 books sounds like a lot, it’s only three shared reading sessions a day for a year. So how does it work?

• Register online at ahml.info/1000books or in Kids’ World.
• Start reading and counting!
• Drop by Kids’ World to check in and receive prizes. 
• The program continues until your child enters kindergarten. 
• Find more details at ahml.info/1000books
 

Helping your child develop early literacy begins with cuddling up and sharing a good book. Research shows that children become readers on the lap of a caring adult. Join us as we reach for 1000!

 
How to Grow a Reader
  • Reading aloud to your child is the single most important thing you can do to help your child be ready to read.
  • We can help you find age-appropriate titles and topics for your child. Ask a librarian for help in choosing books for your baby, toddler or preschooler.
  • You are your child’s first and best teacher. Children learn best through playful interaction with a caring adult.
  • Talk, sing, read, write and play! Engaging in these five practices with your child will help him or her develop early literacy skills.
  • To learn more, sign up for our quarterly Ready to Read eNewsletter.

Posted by aharder on 08/08/16
 
Online Tools for Back to School
Find these at http://www.ahml.info/kids/school_help and http://www.ahml.info/teens/study (except for Testing & Education Reference Center, which is not on the kids’ page)
 
Encyclopedia Britannica: The world-renowned reference tool, with articles, images, videos and helpful links on almost every topic (countries, people, animals, science, etc.). Three versions: For Children, For Young Adults and Reference Center. 1st grade-adult.
 
Student Resources in Context: Reference articles, overviews and magazine journal articles on all topics. Helpful at term paper time! 5th grade-adult.
 
PebbleGo: For emergent readers--short articles and videos about animals, science, biographies and social science. K-2nd grade.
 
Core Concepts (Biology, Chemistry & Periodic Table): Overview articles to help understand important scientific principles. 7th-12 grades.
 
CultureGrams: Detailed overviews of all the world’s countries: government, population, daily life, etc. 3rd-12th grades.
 
Visual Thesaurus: Love wordplay? Use Visual Thesaurus to explore connections between words and build your vocabulary. Read fun, informative articles about the interesting ways in which we use words. There’s even an online spelling be you can join. Also great for ESL learners. 6th grade-adult.
 
Testing & Education Reference Center: Online test prep for ACT, the new SAT, GRE, MCAT, LSAT, GED etc., as well as several vocational tests (ASVAB, PRAXIS, etc.) and language/citizenship tests. High school students can do college and scholarship searches, and job seekers can use a resume-building tool. 10th grade-adult.
 
Tutor.com: Live online tutoring for students in all topics (math, science, social studies, etc.). Older students can get help with standardized test prep and adults can take advantage of their resume-writing assistance. 1st grade-adult.
 

Posted by paichele on 01/30/17
 
What is fake news?
The Internet is full of viral misinformation. Fake news is a false news story designed to look like credible information and makes it difficult to decipher fact from fiction. Fake news typically spreads fast online. How can we wade through it? Always reflect on how you encountered the story. Was it promoted on a website? Did it show up in a social media feed? Was it sent to you by someone you know? Trace the story to its original source.

Here are some other helpful steps to analyze news sources and tools for fact checking.

Put it to the CRAAP Test:
Currency—Can you find a date of the article or photograph? When was it last updated?
Relevance—Who is the intended audience? How does the source meet your needs?
Accuracy—Is the information supported by evidence? Does it cite other sources?
Authority—Who is the author? What are their credentials?
Purpose—Does the site give facts or opinions? Does it have a clear bias?
 
Is it true? Check out these unbiased fact-checking websites:
Snopes
Independent, self-sufficient entity wholly owned by its operators who investigate rumors.
 
Factcheck
Non-partisan, non-profit which acts as a consumer advocate for voters. A project of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania
 
Politifact
Independent fact checking website created by the Tampa Bay Times newspaper. PolitiFact has won the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting
 
Where does the bias lie in the media?
Check out this study from the Pew Research Institute
 
Other resources and articles about Fake News
When Fake News Stories Make Real News Headlines

Looking for more information? Contact a Specialty Info Librarian at questions@ahml.info.
 
 

Posted by aharder on 08/25/15
 
The 9th Annual Teen Film Fest is in the books! More than 160 people came to Metropolis Performing Arts Centre to celebrate Arlington Heights' young filmmakers on August 21. This annual event is co-sponsored by the Arlington Heights Memorial Library, Arlington Heights Arts Commission and Metropolis.
 
Congratulations to the winners:
Best Overall Film - ‘Checkmate’ by Brandon Martin
Best Comedy - ‘Prop Hunt’ by Jared Culm
Best Experimental - ‘Trigger Warning’ by Kathleen Oku
Best Animation - ‘Over the Phone’ by August Graham, Ben Klicker
Best Documentary - ‘Same Molecules’ by Rhegan Graham
Best Music Video - ‘Geronimo’ by Tess Troschuk
 
Many thanks to this year's judges, Daily Herald Film Critic Dann Gire, former Teen Advisory Board president Selena Groh, and Metropolis Executive Director Joe Keefe.
 
For more photos from the night's event, see our photo gallery here.
 
To watch all the films, visit The Hub's You Tube page here.

Posted by paichele on 11/02/15
 
For the eighth consecutive time, Arlington Heights Memorial Library has received a five-star rating in Library Journal's national rating of public libraries. Five stars is the highest rating that a library can receive. Star ratings are based on the annual number of library visits, circulation, program attendance and public Internet computer use.
 
 In 2015, 7,663 U.S. public libraries —more than ever before—were scored on the Library Journal Index of Public Library Service. Nationally, 261 libraries earned a three, four or five-star status including 19 in Illinois. Out of these 19 libraries, Arlington Heights Memorial Library was one of just five public libraries in the state to earn a top five-star rating.

This is an honor for not only our staff and the Library Board of Trustees, but also for you, our customers. Thank you for making us a five-star library once again. See Library Journal's 2015 index of America's Star Libraries.


Posted by bbenson on 04/15/15
 
Congratulations to Kerry W. Pearson and Carole Medal who have been elected to the Board of Library Trustees.
 
The Cook County Clerk's office released vote totals on Wednesday, April 15. They reported that Pearson, a board member since 2003, and Medal, one of three write-in candidates, received the most votes from the April 7 election. A recap of the library board election is reported in the Daily Herald.

Kerry and Carole will be sworn in to office at the May 19 Board of Library Trustees meeting to serve a six-year term.

 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy