Adults

05/17/17
On Tuesday, May 16, the newest members of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library Board of Trustees were sworn in. The seven-member Board of Library Trustees sets the library’s tax levy and budget as well as library policies. Trustees are elected for six-year terms.
 
Debbie Smart Debbie Smart has served as a trustee for six years and has held the positions of treasurer and president of the Board of Library Trustees. She is a member of the Rotary Club of Arlington Heights, Arlington Heights Historical Society, Questers, Kappa Delta Sorority, Arlington Heights Art Commission, St. John UCC Church and the Chamber of Commerce. She was a recipient of the 2014 Hearts of Gold Award for volunteering.
 
Debbie Smart John Supplitt is the senior director of constituency sections for the American Hospital Association. He has 25 years of experience with staffing of and participating on national non-profit boards and panels. Supplitt has a Bachelor of Science from Georgetown University and master’s degrees in public administration from New York University and business administration from Loyola University of Chicago.
 
Debbie Smart Christine C. Tangney is a professor in clinical nutrition and Associate Dean for Research for the College of Health Sciences at Rush University Medical Center. She is involved with the American Cancer Society, and provides lectures and demonstrations about healthy eating and cooking to cancer survivors. She has been a speaker for the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women program. Tangney was elected to a four-year unfilled term. 
 
Debbie Smart Marianthi Thanapoulos is the community engagement liaison for the Village of Mount Prospect. She is the president of Tharos Productions, a local not-for-profit. She is a past member of Women in Film and has volunteered for Big Brothers Big Sisters. She is a member of the PTA and has presented at the University of Chicago. Thanapoulos was first appointed in August of 2016 and served on the Finance and Human Resources Committees of the Board of Library Trustees.
 
 
05/12/17
 
Arlington Heights cardholders now have access to Kanopy, a collection of over 30,000 films from over 1,000 top producers, such as Criterion Collection, The Great Courses, PBS, Media Education Foundation, Stanford Executive Briefings, New Day Films, Cohen Films, California Newsreel, Collective Eye and more. Sample feature film titles include Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon, Jean Cocteau’s Beauty and the Beast, Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times, and the documentary Grey Gardens.
 
Kanopy launches on average 500 new releases per month, ensuring the collection is fresh with the new content. You can watch up to eight videos per month and never need to place a hold. 
 
The link to Kanopy is on the library's Downloads page or you can bookmark http://ahml.kanopystreaming.com. Once you're there, click on the "Sign Up" link and create your profile (you'll be asked for you AHML card number).
05/09/17
 
Gratitude goes a long way especially when it results from the collective efforts of more 450 volunteers who give of their time and energy for a combined purpose - the library. "With Gratitude" was the theme of this year's Volunteer Recognition Luncheon. Funded by the Friends of the Library, the annual gathering was held on Tuesday, May 9 to show appreciation to the dedicated volunteers who contribute to all areas of the library including Kids' World, the Senior Center, Genealogy, ESL, the Friends of the Library and the bookmobile.  

Executive Director Jason Kuhl welcomed the crowd and presented the volunteer service awards.
 
In 2016, 479 volunteers contributed 29,264 hours of service to the library. Thirty six volunteers received special recognition for achieving Hours of Service milestones beginning at 500 hours and topping off at 15,500 hours of service. Years of service were also recognized and spanned from 3 years to 30 years of service. Carol Egan, a volunteer for the Friends of the Library since 1986, was honored threefold with the President's Lifetime Achievement Award, a 30 Years of Service honor and a 4,000 Hours of Service award.
 
The top honor of the day went to Jane Heaton who was named Volunteer of the Year. This is a one-time award that is given to the volunteer who has contributed the greatest number of hours during the previous year but has not previously received the award. Jane earned Volunteer of the Year for contributing 368 hours of service to the library in 2016 volunteering as an English tutor in the library's ESL office.
 
In the words of one of her students, "My teacher has helped me learn English throughout my journey to citizenship...I have come a long way from the beginning and these classes helped make my daily tasks easier in America....thank you so much."
 
11/03/16
 
Albert Einstein was a C student. A messy desk isn't a bad thing, and it's good to surround yourself with wackiness. These were just a few of the facts and nuggets of advice that author Eric Weiner shared with District 214 students during a visit earlier today to Rolling Meadows High School. Weiner's session with the students was the first stop in a day-long visit to Arlington Heights to talk about his book, The Geography of Genius, A Search for the World's Most Creative Places from Athens to Silicon Valley, the library's selection for this year's One Book, One Village community read.
 
"Talent is hitting a mark no one can hit. Genius is hitting a mark no one else can see," Weiner told the students who gathered in the school's Resource Center for a 45-minute session with the author during which he shared insights on creativity, genius and his life as a writer traveling the globe.
 
"I always feel like there is some great wonder around the corner," Weiner said, "You just have to find the corner."
 
More than 300 students at Rolling Meadows High School read The Geography of Genius as summer reading or for a class this fall. Following his talk, the students had an opportunity to ask Weiner questions including, "What is the hardest part of traveling?"
 
"The hardest part of traveling is trusting the universe to provide you with experiences," he said. "Traveling is not about a place but rather it's a new way of looking at things and coming away seeing things differently."

 

09/20/16
 
"It's a book about ideas," said Executive Director Jason Kuhl as he spread the word at Monday night's Village board meeting about the library's third annual One Book, One Village community read. Presenting to Mayor Tom Hayes and the village trustees, Kuhl invited all of Arlington Heights to read this year's book choice, The Geography of Genius by Eric Weiner, which explores why creative genius flourishes at specific places and at specific times. The mayor in turn thanked Kuhl and the library "for your dedication in developing more geniuses in the village of Arlington Heights."
 
Check out a copy of the book today. Then join us for An Evening with Author Eric Weiner on Thursday, November 3 beginning at 7 p.m. in the Hendrickson Room. Registration opens on October 1.
 
 
06/20/16
 
Thanks to the more than 600 people who came out on Saturday, June 18 for our first FanCon, a five-hour, library-wide celebration of all things comic and pop culture. All ages turned out, many dressed as their favorite superhero characters, and enjoyed comic-themed activities including meeting comic book artists to participating in drawing workshops, storytimes, DIY crafts, gaming competitions and taking photos with costumed characters from Star Wars and the Ghostbusters. Read more in the Daily Herald or check out the fun on Instagram.
11/13/15
 
"I think I'm still a short storyteller at heart," author Cristina Henríquez told an audience of 200+ during an appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Thursday evening, November 12. Cristina spoke about her novel, The Book of Unknown Americans, which was chosen as the 2015 One Book, One Village selection by the library. In an interview-style program moderated by Info Services Librarian Mike Monahan, Cristina spoke candidly about her book which she originally wrote as a short story before expanding - a task which took five years to complete and tells the story of two families who have immigrated to the United States from Latin America and their neighbors living in a Delaware apartment complex.
 
"The second you hear someone's story, or imagine their story, it becomes so much harder to be intolerant," she said. "One of the goals of the book was to keep poking at stereotypes."
 
Following the 50-minute conversation on-stage, the author fielded questions from the audience which included sharing insights on the editing and publishing process.

Earlier in the program when asked to describe the meaning of home, Henríquez responded, "Home is not a place. To me, home is a feeling. It's that feeling when your soul sighs."

The Metropolis event capped off a day-long exchange between the author and the Arlington Heights community about The Book Unknown Americans. Earlier at the library, she did a short reading from the novel for an audience in the Cardinal Room and met in the Hub with more than 80 students from three District 214 schools.

 


 
District 214 students meet One Book, One Village author in the Hub
 
What better way to learn about a book than to meet its author. That's what happened for more than 80 high school students who had the opportunity to meet Cristina Henríquez, author of The Book of Unknown Americans, during her November 12 visit to Arlington Heights and the library for One Book, One Village. 
 
The students gathered in the Hub from three schools - John Hersey High School, Rolling Meadows High School and District 214's Newcomer Center - and spent more than an hour with Cristina asking questions about the book, its characters and what it takes to be an author.
 
"It took me five years to write this book and there were days when it really was a struggle and I wondered if I'd ever finish it," she told the students. Henríquez later added, "The best thing you can do for your writing is to forget that anyone is ever going to read it and just write."
 
 
 
09/22/15
 
One Book, One Village, the library's community-wide reading initiative, topped the agenda at the Village's Board of Trustees meeting on Monday, September 21. Deputy Director Jeremy Andrykowski took to the podium to spread the word about this year's selection, The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henríquez
 
"This is the second year in a row that the library’s offering One Book, One Village," Andrykowski said, "And the idea is simple – we want to build community by inviting all of Arlington Heights to read the same book at the same time."
 
Andrykowski introduced a prerecorded video of the author which was played for the mayor, trustees and residents in attendance. 
 
He concluded his remarks by highlighting the author visit by Cristina Henríquez on Thursday, November 12 which is being presented in partnership with the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre. The interview-style program begins at 7 p.m. followed by a book signing with the author.  Arlington Heights residents can register for this event beginning October 1.
 
Visit ahml.info/onebook for more information including upcoming programs and book discussions.
08/25/15
 
The 9th Annual Teen Film Fest is in the books! More than 160 people came to Metropolis Performing Arts Centre to celebrate Arlington Heights' young filmmakers on August 21. This annual event is co-sponsored by the Arlington Heights Memorial Library, Arlington Heights Arts Commission and Metropolis.
 
Congratulations to the winners:
Best Overall Film - ‘Checkmate’ by Brandon Martin
Best Comedy - ‘Prop Hunt’ by Jared Culm
Best Experimental - ‘Trigger Warning’ by Kathleen Oku
Best Animation - ‘Over the Phone’ by August Graham, Ben Klicker
Best Documentary - ‘Same Molecules’ by Rhegan Graham
Best Music Video - ‘Geronimo’ by Tess Troschuk
 
Many thanks to this year's judges, Daily Herald Film Critic Dann Gire, former Teen Advisory Board president Selena Groh, and Metropolis Executive Director Joe Keefe.
 
For more photos from the night's event, see our photo gallery here.
 
To watch all the films, visit The Hub's You Tube page here.
08/18/15
 
It was the Summer of STEM at the library. While school was out, the library was full of children of all ages engaging in science and technology.
 
Children and parents packed the Training Center for an introduction to 3D printing. Just a short walk away, in Kids' World, a group of toddlers and preschoolers were engineering structures from tubes and connectors in a free-play session. Problem-solving skills were on full display as the hard hat-wearing group of young builders figured out which piece connected where. Nearby, another young visitor played on a felt board featuring honey bees and numbers. As her caregiver prompted her to "count the bees," little did she know, she too was learning through STEM free play and toys provided by the library.
 
View more Summer of STEM photos here.
 
 
 
Visit our Computers and Technology page for more information on upcoming classes and the Studio - your library's digital media lab.
 
 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy