The artistry of anger: black and white women's literature in America, 1820-1860
    (2003)

    Fiction

    eBook

    Provider: hoopla

Details

PUBLISHED
[United States] : The University of North Carolina Press : Made available through hoopla, 2003
DESCRIPTION
1 online resource
ISBN/ISSN
9780807860199 (electronic bk.) MWT11719194, 0807860190 (electronic bk.) 11719194
LANGUAGE
English
NOTES

In this compelling interdisciplinary study, Linda Grasso demonstrates that using anger as a mode of analysis and the basis of an aesthetic transforms our understanding of American women's literary history. Exploring how black and white nineteenth-century women writers defined, expressed, and dramatized anger, Grasso reconceptualizes antebellum women's writing and illuminates an unrecognized tradition of discontent in American literature. She maintains that two equally powerful forces shaped this tradition: women's anger at their exclusion from the democratic promise of America, and the cultural prohibition against its public articulation.Grasso challenges the common notion that nineteenth-century women's writing is confined to domestic themes and shows instead how women channeled their anger into art that addresses complex political issues such as slavery, nation-building, gender arrangements, and race relations. Cutting across racial and genre boundaries, she considers works by Lydia Maria Child, Maria W. Stewart, Fanny Fern, and Harriet Wilson as superb examples of the artistry of angry expression. Transforming their anger through literary imagination, these writers bequeathed their vision of an alternative America both to their contemporaries and to subsequent generations

Mode of access: World Wide Web

Additional Credits