Posted by emather on 01.25.14

Just when you thought you were out, they pull you back in...with a bunch more reading recommendations!  Here are some teen book suggestions from library staff outside of teen services, since you're all probably sick of us yelling at you to read books.   Shannon,  Carol, and Amy have written reviews of three unique but excellent.  As always, you can find many more Intralibrary Teen Book Alliance recommendations here.
 
 
 
Could you live in a world where love was outlawed?
 
Lauren Oliver’s novel describes a futuristic Garden of Eden where teens are matched with a “life-mate” and then undergo a procedure to remove their capacity to love.  Teens that flee or resist the procedure are known as “invalids” and are believed to “live like animals…filthy, hungry, desperate.”
 
When Lena and Alex must choose between the law and each other, they know that they are making an impossible decision.  If they run away, they will lose their families.  If they stay and undergo the procedure, they will lose the feelings that they have for their families – and each other.
 
The dramatic conclusion will leave you wondering… What would you risk for love?
 
Review by: Carol E.
Dept: Circulation
 
 
 
Shai is a strong, independent girl who is very talented at what she does for a living. She is a forger. She doesn’t just copy things, however. She uses her magical skills to enhance the very essence of the item she is copying, consequently mirroring not just its appearance, but its entire history. She is so good at her job that she attracts the attention of the Emperor’s entourage. When the Emperor suddenly loses consciousness after an assassination attempt, they see Shai as their only hope against what they fear the most; the loss of their powerful positions in the Empire. In order to prevent a revolution, the Emperor’s highest ranking officials capture Shai in the midst of a forgery, and force her to choose between being sentenced to death, or accepting a job they believe she will not pass up. They challenge her to forge their Emperor’s soul.
 
This is a cleverly written fantasy with a unique storyline, and character development that usually needs at least twice as many pages to pull off. Shai’s personality draws you in so rapidly that before you know what is happening you are immersed in her world, and rooting for her to pull off the impossible. Not only are you pleasantly surprised by the ending, but you get there so quickly that you are almost sorry to see that it is over. Sanderson is well known for his epic fantasies, and more recently for completing the Wheel of Time saga, but this first attempt at a novella was undeniably a success, as well as a Hugo award winner. Marketed for both adults as well as teens, it is absolutely worth reading.
 
Review by: Shannon M.
Dept: Circulation
 
 
 
Weetzie Bat, a high school girl in Los Angeles, is best friends with Dirk.  Weetzie and Dirk have adventures after high school when they find a genie in a magic lamp who grants them three wishes.  Weetzie and Dirk both find love and have many adventures together with their significant others.  This book is a quick read and is fun with its whimsical tone and some bits of magic mixed in with the reality of life. If you are looking for a book that will take you on an adventure, then this is the book for you.
 
Review by: Amy H.
Dept: Bookmobile




Posted by alice on 01.24.14

 
Yesterday, a group of teens joined us for a whirlwind afternoon of filmmaking.  We learned about a few ways to create interesting special effects like magically disappearing and floating objects in our hands with the help of iMovie.  We even created some Instagram videos and watched some cool ones online.  The last part of the program was spent creating stop motion videos using Stop Motion Studio Pro with Wikki Stix (our DIY Kit for the month) and Legos serving as our props.
 
 
This program, as well as our Pop-Up Video program next week are filmmaking programs to help you prepare for our Mini Teen Film Fest next month!  Learn about how to submit an entry, film categories, prizes and more about the Mini Teen Film Fest here.
 
Want to see what we made?  Check out the video of the films teens made at Mini Movie Madness below.  They're all good candidates for the Mini Teen Film Fest!
 




Posted by red_sonya on 01.09.14

Hi, I’m, Sonya the new Teen Services Assistant!
I’ve been working at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library for almost five years now, I’m very happy to now be a part of The Hub!

 
A little about me.

I’m into many different fandoms, like, Supernatural, Doctor Who, and Sherlock (SuperWhoLocked!)

I love working with my hands, I knit, paint, and do many other crafty projects.

I read tons of comic books (any X-men series, and Wonder Woman are my favorites) a lot of manga (Peach Girl was my first series Hot Gimmick was my second which I can reread repeatedly any time) and a lot of anime (Nana is my favorite although I’m watching Rozen Maiden now which is amazing!).
I go to conventions, such as Anime Central and Anime Midwest. I love dressing up as my favorite characters and meeting other people who are into the same things as me.


Please stop by The Hub and talk to me about your favorite comic books, manga, or anime! 
See you around ^-^
 




Posted by Trixie on 01.06.14

One Stop Shop sign
Photo Credit: marc e marc
 
I'm sure everyone is heartbroken about school being closed today and tomorrow. With two weeks off for winter break, you didn't really need a couple of extra days off, right? Well, if you're fretting about upcoming final exams and projects instead of the polar vortex, come into the Hub for a place to study and to get research help!
 
I'm resurrecting a few research tips that I posted a few months ago below. They might come in handy with end-of-semester projects and papers.
 
We'll also be turning the Hub into a Finals Study Lounge on Saturday, January 11th - Thursday, January 16th. Join us for brain friendly snacks, stress relieving therapy dogs, and yoga sessions. We'll have laptops, iPads, and other supplies to help you survive finals!
 
Here are the aforementioned tips. Of course, you can always come into the Hub for help, email, Tweet, or Facebook message us too!
 
Search Strategies:
• Boolean Searching: Use operators to narrow or broaden your search. AND and NOT will narrow your search. OR will broaden your search. Quotation marks will search for a specific string of words (e.g. “moving truck”).
• Use the database's built-in filters to drill down to the most relevant search results.
• Read summary or abstract to determine whether an article will be useful. It will save you time!
• Want to cite an article? Check to see if there is a built-in citation generator on the webpage. If not, Purdue's Online Writing Lab has APA, MLA, and Turabian style guides.
• Searching the web? Evaluate your sources! Use the CRAAP or SMELL test.
 




Posted by emather on 01.02.14

 
In the age of texting, emoji have become a sort of second language to many.  Japanese for "picture" (e-) and "word" (-moji), they are a uniform set of smiley-faces and pictures that are available on text message and other web services like Twitter.  They have become incredibly popular. They have been used to recreate great pieces of art, like the Mona Lisa emoji-mosaic above or an all-emoji-translation of the classic American novel Moby Dick (renamed Emoji Dick.)
 
For the month of January, we are going to be having our own fun with emoji.  Every Monday, we will post an emoji summary of a classic or current teen book on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.  Be the first to guess what book we've emoji-fied, and you'll win a prize!
 
But we want YOU to write your own emoji book summaries, too!  Tag them with #HUBemojibooks, and we'll not only share our favorites, but the best ones will ALSO win a prize, not to mention Internet infamy. (Would that be Internetfamy?  Probably not...)
 
So keep an eye out every Monday for a new book for you to translate.  The first will come on January 6th.  And don't forget to keep your own coming in. Until then, we wish you all a smiley-cat, purple heart, hatching chick, and bowl of ramen!




Posted by emather on 12.31.13

                 
 
As the year comes to a close, we always like to look back, and it's impossible to deny that 2013 has been anything but a great year for books.  Several series concluded (Allegiant, the Sweet Tooth and Locke & Key comic series), kept going in new and interesting ways (ProdigyRose Under Fire) and amazing new ones began (The 5th Wave). We saw books from both great new authors and old favorites (both Rainbow Rowell and Neil Gaiman each published two great books this year). We polled both HUB staff and HUB teens for their favorite books of 2013. You can find the results below.  See if your favorite book is on the list (feel free to yell at us in the comments if it's not), and you'll probably find one or two great picks to add to your to-read list.
 

HUB Teens' Five Favorite Books of 2013:

 
  1. The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
  2. TIE: Allegiant by Veronica Roth, Prodigy by Marie Lu
  3. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
  4. The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
  5. The Coldest Girl in Coldtown by Holly Black
 
 
 
 
 
 




Posted by emather on 12.23.13

 
We had a great time at the Holiday Movie Roast program on Friday night.  As you can see, we decorated some holiday cookies and busted out our ugliest sweaters (congratulations to contest winners Tessa and Miranda!).  The true fun of the evening was roasting the insanely cheesy and unintentionally-hilarious Jingle All the Way.  We sent our snark out in the form of text messages, which appeared on the screen with scenes like this:
 
 
As you can imagine, finding material to make fun of wasn't too hard.  It is almost definitely the most fun anyone has ever had while watching Jingle All the Way.
 
 
 




Posted by Trixie on 12.18.13

I'm just damned. I am utterly and completely damned. You'll shoot me at the end no matter what I do, because that's what you do to enemy agents. It's what we do to enemy agents. After I write this confession, if you don't shoot me and I ever make it home, I'll be tried and shot as a collaborator anyway. But I look at all the dark and twisted roads ahead and this is the easy one, the obvious one. What's in my future - a tin of kerosene poured down my throat and a match held to my lips?

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein is an expressive novel set during World War II. Verity, a secret agent, is captured by the Gestapo and “convinced” to reveal her mission. Verity explores her past, how she came to be a spy, and how she arrived in Nazi-occupied France in her written confession. Verity is battling for her life as she fills sheet after sheet followed by random scraps of paper. As her intricate story unfolds, readers are left to wonder whether her detailed confession will be enough to save her life.
 
To be perfectly honest, I’ve never been one to enjoy historical fiction. I’d much rather read factual or personal accounts related to an event or time period. Well, I absolutely LOVED this book! Wein weaves a beautiful tale of desperation, courage, and friendship. The novel is written in journal-style from Verity’s and her pilot friend Kittyhawk’s points of view. Through these characters’ perilous journeys, readers experience the heartache and anxiety of friends and family separated during wartime. The harrowing tale pits evil against a clever, would-be traitor. I HIGHLY recommend this book – you won’t be disappointed!
 
 




Posted by emather on 12.18.13

“There is much difference between imitating a man and counterfeiting him.”
 
That was said by Benjamin Franklin, a dude so cool and smart that we put him on the hundred dollar bill.
 
A few weeks ago, we wrote a cool post about intellectual property and fair use in regards to the Beastie Boys' song “Girls” and a web video parodying it.  There are various rules, laws, and ethics telling us the right ways to use other people’s ideas.  Fair Use allows us to use other people’s intellectual property, but under certain conditions: how you use the copyrighted work, if you change or alter it, the amount of the work you use, etc.  One thing that always works in your favor when using someone else’s work is to attribute the original creator.  Taking someone else’s ideas and claiming them as your own is the ugly flipside to Fair Use, and is a use that is almost never ever ever never “fair.”
 
Using someone else’s ideas without giving them credit is called plagiarism.  As some of you may have read, the actor/filmmaker Shia LaBeouf (of Transformers and Even Stevens fame) is in some hot water about a short film he just released.  Titled HowardCantour.com, it is an almost direct adaptation of a comic written by famous artist Daniel Clowes (author of Ghost World and many others) called Justin M. Damiano.  Nowhere in the credits for the film did LaBeouf say that his film was inspired by Clowes, and he never once contacted the author for permission to adapt his work. (Ironic that the “credits” don’t give proper credit, no?) LaBeouf has since apologized, but some people are even questioning if his apologies are plagiarized, too!
 
It’s a good thing I said my quote up top was from Benjamin Franklin.  Leaving that out would have been bad.  Even worse would have been leaving the quotation marks off. That would make it seem like that was my own idea, and my own words. But it wasn’t.  It was Franklin’s ideas, and Franklin’s words.  As you all know, when writing a research paper or anything else, it is essential that you credit where you get your ideas from.  A bibliography or works cited page, and in-text citations or footnotes, help keep you in the clear when it comes to plagiarism.  It’s important to build your own ideas off of the awesome ideas that have come before, but acknowledging from where you get those first ideas is also important.  If you ever have questions, talk with any of the HUB staff, and we’ll help you get your citations in order and avoid “counterfeiting” your ideas.




Posted by Trixie on 12.12.13

I follow the Huff Post Teen blog. A couple of weeks ago, I came across a post written by Phoebe Dodds, a teen living in London, England. This post titled “Lost in Translation” explored foreign language books and films in a culture that predominantly speaks English. This post really piqued my interest since one of my duties at the Hub is to provide library resources like books, magazines, and DVDs to ESL students at Newcomer Center. This District 214 program assists high school students that have recently moved to the United States and are new to the English language. A large part of the items I send them are popular teen books originally written in English translated to their native languages.

An interesting fact that Dodds states in her post, “only 3 percent of all books published in English are translations”, blows my mind! Clearly, much more goes into translating a book from its native language. Nuance, mode of expression, and humor have to be considered and might not have a literal translation; however, there have to be more books out there worth translating! Reading this post prompted me to make a list of books translated to English. Some might surprise you, like The Three Musketeers. Some are new, like Ruby Red and 1Q84. Check one out and broaden your horizons.