Posted by red_sonya on 02.07.14

                                                                       
 
Drawings don’t normally move but Katie swears the mysterious Tomohiro’s drawings just did. Katie, an American girl, is a world away from home in Japan, still adjusting to the language barrier and culture gap. When Katie gets involved with the intriguing and sometimes dangerous Tomohiro and his moving drawings, her life changes forever. She is left wondering why the ink is seemingly drawn to her all while learning about Kami (Shinto Gods) and dodging the Yakuza (a Japanese gang).
 
 
This is a book full of Japanese mythology, danger, with a dash of romance. As an avid manga reader, I felt like Ink could easily be made into one; as the plot is very similar to many shojo mangas. The book has many images within it that coincides with what you are reading. There are many Japanese words you learn through out Ink (there is a glossary in the back to explain them so don’t worry!). This book is wonderful for those Japanophiles out there. It gives a good look at what life is like living in a foreign country, dealing with the different culture, and their everyday lives.
 
 
Ink was a very quick read; it’s very intriguing, and gripping. I thoroughly enjoyed and it and will be purchasing it for my own collection at home. The book does end on a cliffhanger and sadly the next book, Rain, doesn’t come out till June this year (which I have on preorder already).
 
There is also a prequel to Ink, called Shadow, which is available for free on Amazon!
 




Posted by Trixie on 02.05.14

February is "heart the library" month and we're celebrating in the Hub!
 
Come out and up-cycle an old book or make a book-based paper craft. There are many different project ideas in books we've checked out for the Hub (like The Repurposed Library and Art Made From Booksor come up with your own project!
 
DIY book mobile
 
We even have a photo booth for you to pose with your favorite item from the library's collection or something you made in the Hub. Take one copy of the picture home with you and leave the other here telling everyone why YOU heart the library!
 




Posted by tspicer on 02.01.14

Programs




Posted by Trixie on 01.27.14

If you’re anything like me, you opted to watch the Blackhawks game instead of the Grammys. Although it was a heartbreaking Hawks loss, I would still choose it over the Grammys. Don’t get me wrong – I REALLY dig music. The Grammys just have a little too much hoopla for me. Sounds like I missed some epic performances: Beyonce & Jay Z, Kendrick Lamar & Imagine Dragons, not to mention Taylor Swift’s dance moves and a giant wedding ceremony. Luckily, coverage was pretty thorough; a web search delivered dozens of clips to accompany my morning coffee!
 
Source: Time Out London

Here’s a rundown of the most important part of the Grammys – the winners of course!

Record of the year & Best pop duo/group performance
"Get Lucky" -- Daft Punk featuring Pharrell Williams and Nile Rodgers
Album of the year & Best dance/electronica album
"Random Access Memories" -- Daft Punk
Song of the year & Best pop solo performance
"Royals" -- Lorde
Best new artist 
Macklemore & Ryan Lewis (Best rap album -- "The Heist" and Best rap performance & Best rap song -- "Thrift Shop")
Best pop vocal album
Bruno Mars -- "Unorthodox Jukebox"
Best dance recording
"Clarity" -- Zedd featuring Foxes
Best traditional pop vocal album
"To Be Loved" -- Michael Bublé
Best rock performance
Imagine Dragons -- "Radioactive"
Best metal performances
Black Sabbath -- "God is Dead?"
Best rock song
"Cut Me Some Slack" -- Paul McCartney, Dave Grohl, Krist Novoselic, Pat Smear
Best rock album
Led Zeppelin -- "Celebration Day"
Best alternative music album
Vampire Weekend -- "Modern Vampires of the City"
Best R&B song
"Pusher Love Girl" -- Justin Timberlake
Best urban contemporary album
Rihanna -- "Unapologetic"
Best R&B album
Alicia Keys -- "Girl on Fire"
Best rap/sung collaboration
Jay Z featuring Justin Timberlake -- "Holy Grail"
Best country solo performance
Darius Rucker -- "Wagon Wheel"
Best country duo/group performance
The Civil Wars -- "From This Valley"
Best country album
Kacey Musgraves -- "Same Trailer Different Park" (Best country song -- "Merry Go 'Round")
Producer of the year, nonclassical
Pharrell Williams
Best compilation soundtrack for visual media
"Sound City: Real to Reel"
Best score soundtrack for visual media
"Skyfall"
Best song written for visual media
Adele -- "Skyfall" -- "Skyfall"
Best music video
Justin Timberlake featuring Jay Z -- "Suit & Tie"
Best music film
Paul McCartney -- "Live Kisses"
 
A complete list of nominees and winners can be found on the Grammy site.
 

For all of you aspiring musicians, check out our Battle of the Recorded Bands contest: YOU could play a live show to kick off the library's summer reading program!




Posted by emather on 01.25.14

Just when you thought you were out, they pull you back in...with a bunch more reading recommendations!  Here are some teen book suggestions from library staff outside of teen services, since you're all probably sick of us yelling at you to read books.   Shannon,  Carol, and Amy have written reviews of three unique but excellent.  As always, you can find many more Intralibrary Teen Book Alliance recommendations here.
 
 
 
Could you live in a world where love was outlawed?
 
Lauren Oliver’s novel describes a futuristic Garden of Eden where teens are matched with a “life-mate” and then undergo a procedure to remove their capacity to love.  Teens that flee or resist the procedure are known as “invalids” and are believed to “live like animals…filthy, hungry, desperate.”
 
When Lena and Alex must choose between the law and each other, they know that they are making an impossible decision.  If they run away, they will lose their families.  If they stay and undergo the procedure, they will lose the feelings that they have for their families – and each other.
 
The dramatic conclusion will leave you wondering… What would you risk for love?
 
Review by: Carol E.
Dept: Circulation
 
 
 
Shai is a strong, independent girl who is very talented at what she does for a living. She is a forger. She doesn’t just copy things, however. She uses her magical skills to enhance the very essence of the item she is copying, consequently mirroring not just its appearance, but its entire history. She is so good at her job that she attracts the attention of the Emperor’s entourage. When the Emperor suddenly loses consciousness after an assassination attempt, they see Shai as their only hope against what they fear the most; the loss of their powerful positions in the Empire. In order to prevent a revolution, the Emperor’s highest ranking officials capture Shai in the midst of a forgery, and force her to choose between being sentenced to death, or accepting a job they believe she will not pass up. They challenge her to forge their Emperor’s soul.
 
This is a cleverly written fantasy with a unique storyline, and character development that usually needs at least twice as many pages to pull off. Shai’s personality draws you in so rapidly that before you know what is happening you are immersed in her world, and rooting for her to pull off the impossible. Not only are you pleasantly surprised by the ending, but you get there so quickly that you are almost sorry to see that it is over. Sanderson is well known for his epic fantasies, and more recently for completing the Wheel of Time saga, but this first attempt at a novella was undeniably a success, as well as a Hugo award winner. Marketed for both adults as well as teens, it is absolutely worth reading.
 
Review by: Shannon M.
Dept: Circulation
 
 
 
Weetzie Bat, a high school girl in Los Angeles, is best friends with Dirk.  Weetzie and Dirk have adventures after high school when they find a genie in a magic lamp who grants them three wishes.  Weetzie and Dirk both find love and have many adventures together with their significant others.  This book is a quick read and is fun with its whimsical tone and some bits of magic mixed in with the reality of life. If you are looking for a book that will take you on an adventure, then this is the book for you.
 
Review by: Amy H.
Dept: Bookmobile




Posted by alice on 01.24.14

 
Yesterday, a group of teens joined us for a whirlwind afternoon of filmmaking.  We learned about a few ways to create interesting special effects like magically disappearing and floating objects in our hands with the help of iMovie.  We even created some Instagram videos and watched some cool ones online.  The last part of the program was spent creating stop motion videos using Stop Motion Studio Pro with Wikki Stix (our DIY Kit for the month) and Legos serving as our props.
 
 
This program, as well as our Pop-Up Video program next week are filmmaking programs to help you prepare for our Mini Teen Film Fest next month!  Learn about how to submit an entry, film categories, prizes and more about the Mini Teen Film Fest here.
 
Want to see what we made?  Check out the video of the films teens made at Mini Movie Madness below.  They're all good candidates for the Mini Teen Film Fest!
 




Posted by red_sonya on 01.09.14

Hi, I’m, Sonya the new Teen Services Assistant!
I’ve been working at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library for almost five years now, I’m very happy to now be a part of The Hub!

 
A little about me.

I’m into many different fandoms, like, Supernatural, Doctor Who, and Sherlock (SuperWhoLocked!)

I love working with my hands, I knit, paint, and do many other crafty projects.

I read tons of comic books (any X-men series, and Wonder Woman are my favorites) a lot of manga (Peach Girl was my first series Hot Gimmick was my second which I can reread repeatedly any time) and a lot of anime (Nana is my favorite although I’m watching Rozen Maiden now which is amazing!).
I go to conventions, such as Anime Central and Anime Midwest. I love dressing up as my favorite characters and meeting other people who are into the same things as me.


Please stop by The Hub and talk to me about your favorite comic books, manga, or anime! 
See you around ^-^
 




Posted by Trixie on 01.06.14

One Stop Shop sign
Photo Credit: marc e marc
 
I'm sure everyone is heartbroken about school being closed today and tomorrow. With two weeks off for winter break, you didn't really need a couple of extra days off, right? Well, if you're fretting about upcoming final exams and projects instead of the polar vortex, come into the Hub for a place to study and to get research help!
 
I'm resurrecting a few research tips that I posted a few months ago below. They might come in handy with end-of-semester projects and papers.
 
We'll also be turning the Hub into a Finals Study Lounge on Saturday, January 11th - Thursday, January 16th. Join us for brain friendly snacks, stress relieving therapy dogs, and yoga sessions. We'll have laptops, iPads, and other supplies to help you survive finals!
 
Here are the aforementioned tips. Of course, you can always come into the Hub for help, email, Tweet, or Facebook message us too!
 
Search Strategies:
• Boolean Searching: Use operators to narrow or broaden your search. AND and NOT will narrow your search. OR will broaden your search. Quotation marks will search for a specific string of words (e.g. “moving truck”).
• Use the database's built-in filters to drill down to the most relevant search results.
• Read summary or abstract to determine whether an article will be useful. It will save you time!
• Want to cite an article? Check to see if there is a built-in citation generator on the webpage. If not, Purdue's Online Writing Lab has APA, MLA, and Turabian style guides.
• Searching the web? Evaluate your sources! Use the CRAAP or SMELL test.
 




Posted by emather on 01.02.14

 
In the age of texting, emoji have become a sort of second language to many.  Japanese for "picture" (e-) and "word" (-moji), they are a uniform set of smiley-faces and pictures that are available on text message and other web services like Twitter.  They have become incredibly popular. They have been used to recreate great pieces of art, like the Mona Lisa emoji-mosaic above or an all-emoji-translation of the classic American novel Moby Dick (renamed Emoji Dick.)
 
For the month of January, we are going to be having our own fun with emoji.  Every Monday, we will post an emoji summary of a classic or current teen book on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.  Be the first to guess what book we've emoji-fied, and you'll win a prize!
 
But we want YOU to write your own emoji book summaries, too!  Tag them with #HUBemojibooks, and we'll not only share our favorites, but the best ones will ALSO win a prize, not to mention Internet infamy. (Would that be Internetfamy?  Probably not...)
 
So keep an eye out every Monday for a new book for you to translate.  The first will come on January 6th.  And don't forget to keep your own coming in. Until then, we wish you all a smiley-cat, purple heart, hatching chick, and bowl of ramen!




Posted by emather on 12.31.13

                 
 
As the year comes to a close, we always like to look back, and it's impossible to deny that 2013 has been anything but a great year for books.  Several series concluded (Allegiant, the Sweet Tooth and Locke & Key comic series), kept going in new and interesting ways (ProdigyRose Under Fire) and amazing new ones began (The 5th Wave). We saw books from both great new authors and old favorites (both Rainbow Rowell and Neil Gaiman each published two great books this year). We polled both HUB staff and HUB teens for their favorite books of 2013. You can find the results below.  See if your favorite book is on the list (feel free to yell at us in the comments if it's not), and you'll probably find one or two great picks to add to your to-read list.
 

HUB Teens' Five Favorite Books of 2013:

 
  1. The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
  2. TIE: Allegiant by Veronica Roth, Prodigy by Marie Lu
  3. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
  4. The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
  5. The Coldest Girl in Coldtown by Holly Black