Posted by Trixie on 08.18.15

Come in to the HUB and make a disco ball to hang in your locker this upcoming year!
Image credit: WikiHow, how to make a disco ball with cd’s
It’s a super easy project, all you need is:
1 Styrofoam ball (2.5 inches)
1 CD
A hot glue gun
A small wooden rod
Here is how it works:
  1. Use a wooden rod to poke a hole sideways throw the top of the ball.
  2. Cut a piece of string to be 9 inches and thread it through the hole you just made (taping the ends of the string may help it go through)
  3. Using scissors, cut the CD into small pieces of varying sizes (WEAR SAFETY GOGGLES, they sometimes fly all over)
  4. Use a glue gun to glue the pieces onto the ball
  5. Hang in your locker and party the year away!

Posted by Trixie on 08.13.15

Over the weekend, we welcomed professional photographer Rebecca Reuland to the HUB. She presented a photography and Photoshop program resulting in teen-made movie posters.

First, we examined popular movie posters, how they use film stills and text to grab your attention and convey what the movie is about.

Next, we broke into groups to brainstorm supposed films and possible shots we could set up in and around the library.
Then, the fun part, we set up shots based on the genre and setting of the films. Using existing lighting, reflectors, aperture speed, and other effects, each team took multiple shots to manipulate for their movie’s posters.

After a brief tutorial on Photoshop, teens made posters for films that featured Freddy Fazbear's Pizza, killer books that come to life at the library, a ukulele wielding killer, a documentary about books, and more!
Image Credit: Anubhav A. & Ryan D.
Image credit: Clarissa G. & Emma K.

Interested in photography or Photoshop? Check out the library’s program calendar for upcoming classes or stop by the HUB!

Posted by Trixie on 07.07.15

Join our summer selfie scavenger hunt!
Selfie instructions will be posted to our Instagram every Tuesday in July. Post your selfies to Instagram using #hubselfiehunt. Participate and get a chance to win a pool prize pack (which includes two pool passes & more!). We’ll post the winner the first week of August! Good luck!

Posted by Trixie on 07.06.15

This month in the HUB we’re repurposing vinyl records into small notebooks. Stop by, make your notebook and complete a challenge for the teen summer Read to the Rhythm program!
Too busy? Don’t fret – here are the instructions for you to tackle this project at home!
SAFETY FIRST – use protective eyewear while scoring and breaking your record to the perfect size!
1.       Cut record to the size for notebook cover.
· Use ruler and utility knife to score* vinyl.
*Run blade along ruler to cut shallow channel on surface of record.
· Use the edge of a table to break record along scored line.
2.       Prepare pages of your notebook.
· Cut pages to size – about the length of the cover laid flat.
· Fold in half to form a book.
· Use stapler or thread to bind pages.
3.       Construct your notebook.
·  Align cover and pages of notebook.
· Use duct tape to form cover. Tape along flat edges leaving room for the thickness of your notebook pages.
· Attach first and last page to the front and back cover to form the notebook.
Adapted from Gem & Em.

Posted by Trixie on 04.26.15

Friday, April 24th, marked the 100 year anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. Not as well-known as the genocide that spurred World War II, more than 1 million Armenians were slaughtered or deported by the Ottoman Turks beginning in 1915. Some historians consider this to the primer used by Nazi Germany for the Holocaust.


Globally, from Los Angeles to Yerevan, crowds gathered to pay tribute to those lost and bring awareness to this catastrophe that continues to affect Armenians worldwide. American rock band System of a Down performed in Yerevan's Republic Square to honor their Armenian heritage.



Want to learn more? Explore more with these resources!


Posted by Trixie on 03.30.15

"I start to run, start to turn into air, the blue careening off the sky, careening after me, as I sink into green, shades and shades of it, blending and spinning into yellow, freaking yellow, then head-on colliding in the punk-hair purple of lupine: everywhere. I vacuum it in, all of it, in, in – (SELF-PORTRAIT: Boy Detonates Grenade of Awesome) – getting happy now, the gulpy, out-of-breath kind that makes you feel you have a thousand lives crammed inside your measly one…"
I'll Give You the Sun gif
I absolutely adored this book! It’s beautifully written and had me laughing, crying, and completely giddy. I raced through it like light speeding through the universe.
(SELF-PORTRAIT: Teen Librarian Squealing with Delight)
Jandy Nelson’s I’ll Give You the Sun is about twins Noah and Jude. Like most twins, they are incredibly close; they have an uncanny ability to know what the other is thinking and can finish each other’s sentences. Noah is an eccentric artist. He’s constantly drawing or painting, sometimes just in his head. Jude is a gregarious daredevil. She loves surfing and makes friends easily. The story begins when the twins are thirteen, a time when they’re experiencing change and exploring life. It continues through sixteen when they’ve seemingly switched roles. They’re coming to terms with the heartbreak they’ve felt due to tragedy and loss, tentatively living their lives and trying to rebuild.
The novel shifts between Noah’s and Jude’s perspectives alternating from early to later years. The voices and viewpoints juxtaposed plainly shows that neither character has the whole story. Throughout Noah’s narration, his artist mind is evident: he’s constantly imagining his surroundings in colors and relays how he’d describe the moment on canvas or paper and what he’d name it. Jude’s are filled with quirky wives’ tales and superstition.
Nelson’s writing is lyrical and expressive. The characters and imagery jump off the page. The characters’ confusion, heartache, and elation are felt through description. Nelson weaves a vivid tale of life, loss, and love intertwined with a message about self-identity and being true to yourself.
This is a must-read for romantics, artists, inspiration seekers, and lovers of words!

Posted by Trixie on 12.23.14

If you haven't heard, we have a 3D printer and scanner in the Hub! So far, we've had a couple of programs teaching teens how to 3D model their own designs and use this technology.
Besides printing out cool trinkets and rapid prototyping, 3D printing has many practical uses too. Imagine printing out a missing piece to your favorite board game or replicating a lost button on a well-worn sweater. You can even use a 3D printer for household repairs! Recently, a pair of brackets for blinds in my apartment broke. Instead of going out and buying new brackets, I decided to model a pair using TinkerCAD. See the different design iterations below.
If you are interested in learning more about the library's 3D printers, join us at one of these upcoming programs or stop by the Hub to chat.

Posted by Trixie on 10.31.14

“I’m a gamer and I kick arse. No, seriously. I organize a guild online and I’m looking for a few of you chickens to join me.”
In Real Life is a coming-of-age graphic novel that opens with Anda’s birthday. She’s a gamer girl who just moved to a new town and is trying to figure out where she fits in. Enter Liza McCombs – she heads an all-girl guild in Coarsegold Online, a massive multiplayer roleplaying game. Not only does the game provide a place for Anda to explore her identity, but it also allows her to investigate socioeconomic issues around the world and close to home.
Cory Doctorow knocks it out of the park in his debut graphic novel! He highlights complex topics like gold farming, economic inequality, and labor rights all with a feminist message.
Jen Wang’s illustrations are stunning. Real life characters are juxtaposed with their online avatars and in some panels the lines are blurred. The characters’ expressions are exquisite – they convey feeling and humanize the drawings. Her art is dynamic with perfect coloring.
I highly recommend this book to readers of all ages. It’s a page turner and will pique interest in “real-life” issues.

Posted by Trixie on 09.12.14

Last month the library launched a community-wide reading program: One Book, One Village! This fall we'll rally around the book Ordinary Grace written by William Kent Krueger. Besides reading and discussing, teens can participate in other ways. There are programs you can attend over the next couple of months including an author visit. In the Hub, we'll have One Book, One Village related drop-in activities and contests.
Stop by and join the conversation!
  • LEGOsota 1961
    Stop by the Hub and help us recreate New Bremen using LEGOs. Drop in.
  • youD 3D Contest
    What object or symbol from Ordinary Grace do you think best represents the book? Post to any of our social media pages with the tag #youD3D or email us at Make suggestions for participants to 3D model at the youD 3D program on Monday, October 27th. If your object is selected, get a 3D print of your suggestion!


  • DIY Dog Tags
    Make your very own military dog tags in the Hub. Drop in.
  • Photo Reenact
    Reenact a scene from Ordinary Grace and post to one of our social media accounts with the tag #OBOVphoto or email us at for a chance to win.

Posted by Trixie on 08.25.14

You may have noticed the Ice Bucket Challenge that went viral over the past few weeks. Well, the Hub's staff was challenged. Naturally, we accepted.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's Disease) is a disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. Degeneration of motor neurons, leads to weakness and muscle atrophy throughout the body, eventually leading to difficulty with walking, swallowing, and even breathing. Most diagnosed with this disease die from respiratory failure.
We've put together this list of resources to help you understand ALS. Before you take the plunge, learn about the disease that's been brought into the spotlight with clever marketing.