Posted by Trixie on 07/23/13

On Friday, we 3D scanned, modeled, and printed portraits for 16 teens in the library's Marketplace. Don't know much about 3D printing? Basically, a digital model can be "printed" into a three-dimensional, solid object using this technology. Here's an infographic and a video that explains the process.
 
Jesse DePinto from Voxel Metric, Inc. was here to scan and 3D model the participants' heads. Check out the gallery of 3D models - you can get a 360° view of the busts that were printed!
 
 
Andrew Morrison from Workshop 88 joined us to demo his Makerbot Replicator 2 and 3D print the portraits.
 
AHML's own resident maker Chris Krueger (aka The New Hobbyist) showed off some of his prints and answered audience questions too!
 
Below is a video recap of the program. You can check out more video and photos from the program on the Digifii website.
 




Posted by amypelman on 07/16/13

 
What do all your t-shirts, cool canvas bags, and concert posters have in common?  The images most likely got on all those things using the method known as screen printing (sometimes also called silk screen).  This is a technique where the printer pushes ink through a mesh screen onto the fabric or paper. An image is exposed onto the screen (or is placed underneath it) creating a stencil that can be used over and over again.  Last Friday the ink was flying in the D.I.Y. space in The Hub.  First teens tried their hand at printing posters using a pre-made screen with the Hub logo on it.  We got perfect prints, reading for framing! Then everyone designed their very own simple paper stencil to print.  Great artwork and a fun time was had by all! 
 
 
Interested in trying your hand at screen printing?  Since we have these great screens in The Hub, we will definitely be offering more opportunities to come in and try it.  In the meantime, there are kits you can buy to do screen printing at home.  Here is a nice overview of the process:
 
The screen printing program kicked off our very own version of Google+ Maker Camp!  Stop on by the Hub to pick up a pin and some stickers and sign-up to try out something interesting like "squishy circuits" and soldering a blinky robot pin!  
 




Posted by alice on 07/02/13

 
Who doesn't enjoy receiving a greeting card?  Birthday cards, Get Well cards, Just Sayin' Hello cards... they can all put a smile on the recipient's face.  
 
The greeting cards we created on Saturday at the DIY: LED Greeting Cards program must've put a huge, toothy smile on some special recipient's face then.  We used Bare Paint conductive ink, a battery, LEDs, and some knowledge of circuitry to create greeting cards that light up!
 
Missed the program or need a re-cap?  You can find the instructions on how to create your own LED Greeting Cards below, or, you can purchase a kit from sparkfun.com
 
1. Use the robot templates that come with the kit or create your own design on a blank paper.
2. Cut off a small strip of paper. This will be used for the “switch” later on.
3. Use the push pin to punch holes for the battery and LED prongs.
4. Trace the black lines on the templates (if using the robot drawings) with the Bare Paint pen.
5. WAIT FOR THE INK TO DRY!!!!
6. Place the battery into one of the pairs of holes and the LED into the other. Flatten them out at a 90 degree angle.
7. Make sure that the legs match, long LED leg to long battery leg and the same for the short legs.
8. Remember that strip of paper from step 2?  We’re using it now.  Glue it to the spot shown in the picture. This is how the “circuit” will be completed.
9. Add a blob of ink to the switch and wait for it to dry.
10. To turn it on simply press the switch down to complete the circuit!
 
As always, if you have any questions on this program, feel free to drop by The Hub and ask one of our staff!
 
DIY, programs




Posted by alice on 07/02/13

 
Who doesn't enjoy receiving a greeting card?  Birthday cards, Get Well cards, Just Sayin' Hello cards... they can all put a smile on the recipient's face.  
 
The greeting cards we created on Saturday at the DIY: LED Greeting Cards program must've put a huge, toothy smile on some special recipient's face then.  We used Bare Paint conductive ink, a battery, LEDs, and some knowledge of circuitry to create greeting cards that light up!
 
Missed the program or need a re-cap?  You can find the instructions on how to create your own LED Greeting Cards below, or, you can purchase a kit from sparkfun.com
 
1. Use the robot templates that come with the kit or create your own design on a blank paper.
2. Cut off a small strip of paper. This will be used for the “switch” later on.
3. Use the push pin to punch holes for the battery and LED prongs.
4. Trace the black lines on the templates (if using the robot drawings) with the Bare Paint pen.
5. WAIT FOR THE INK TO DRY!!!!
6. Place the battery into one of the pairs of holes and the LED into the other. Flatten them out at a 90 degree angle.
7. Make sure that the legs match, long LED leg to long battery leg and the same for the short legs.
8. Remember that strip of paper from step 2?  We’re using it now.  Glue it to the spot shown in the picture. This is how the “circuit” will be completed.
9. Add a blob of ink to the switch and wait for it to dry.
10. To turn it on simply press the switch down to complete the circuit!
 
As always, if you have any questions on this program, feel free to drop by The Hub and ask one of our staff!
 
DIY, programs




Posted by Trixie on 06/13/13

 
We’re launching another activity in the Hub: the Take Apart Cart!

The Make It summer program is in full swing - we’ve signed up over 170 teens and some participants have already earned 2 of the 3 required stamps to be a finisher. Here’s another activity that can earn you a MAKER stamp.

An important step in making something is understanding how it works: the mechanics, the components used, design based on function, etc. A great way to learn about how something works is to thoughtfully take it apart or unmake it. Without further ado, we’d like to introduce the Hub’s Take Apart Cart: a library cart overflowing with old tech and other stuff for you to take apart and learn from! Join us in the DIY area, Monday-Friday between 2-4 p.m. The Cart, tools, and staff will be available for your unmaking needs. Learn about how a clock works or what components go into making a laptop.

What will we do with the pieces you've taken apart? You can either try to remake it or repurpose the parts to make something new. Hopefully, this has piqued your interest enough to come check out what we have for you to unmake beginning on Monday, June 17th.




Posted by mkrueger on 06/03/13

For May we had a DIY project that was a bit of a throwback, string art. String art has been around since the early 19th century but didn't really become popularized until the 1960's. Using cork board, some map pins, and embroidery floss you can create really interesting mathematical and other geometric designs. You can see a gallery below of what our attendees created.
 
 
Would you like to create your own string art? Take a look at the video below to find out how!
 




Posted by amypelman on 05/13/13

 
We had a great program last Saturday.  Here are some photos of the awesome tattoos we made:
If you want to make your own, it's pretty easy.  Here's how:
 
Supplies:
1. Stencils.  We used adhesive contact paper to cut out shapes and stick on the skin to be painted in.  The best stencils are made using an exact-o knife, so if you go that route - be very, very careful!  Try to get a cutting mat surface to use because that makes it a lot easier.  You could also tape pre-made paper stencils to your skin, but they are a little tougher to work with than the contact paper.
2. Eye shadow.
3. Liner Sealer (this one is about $10.00 on amazon, not including shipping).  Sephora sells one by "Make up Forever" that is $22.00. 
 
How you do it:
Scrape some eye shadow into a small container (even a soda bottle cap will work).  Add 3 or 4 drops of liner sealer and mix with a paintbrush.  Fill in your stencil using the paintbrush, or the little applicators that come with the eye shadow.  Peel off your stencil.  Voila!  It's now a waterproof tattoo that should last a few days!  Want a little more detail or a different explanation?  Here's where I got the idea.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




Posted by Trixie on 05/09/13

 
Last Saturday, May the 4th (be with you), was National Star Wars Day. In celebration, the HUB had a program where we learned about basic circuitry and made jawa figurines with light-up eyes. I promised to post instructions for those that weren't able to finish during the allotted time - threading conductive thread into the eye of a needle is difficult! If you didn't attend and want to make your own jawa with light-up eyes, I modified this build to accommodate budget and length of the program. Please feel free to stop by the HUB if you have any questions or need help with your jawa!
 
  1. Using conductive thread, sew the positive wire. Make sure you are sewing the LEDs on the inside of the figurine.  In the diagram below, it's shown as "+" signs. 
  2. Once your wire is below the battery access slit, attach the battery holder by sewing through the copper positive terminal.
  3. Next, sew the short negative wire, shown as "-" signs and highlighted in the diagram. Begin at the copper negative terminal on the battery holder. The end of the wire should be on the front side of the figurine (opposite the battery holder).
  4. Now, sew one part of the metal snap using the conductive thread. This will serve as the switch for the jawa's eyes.
  5. You will now sew the other negative wire, also shown as "-" signs and highlighted. Begin by sewing the other part of the metal snap switch to the flap on the front of the figurine.
  6. Insert the battery into the holder and test the LEDs to make sure that your circuit is complete and not shorting out.
  7. If the eyes light up, sew most of the jawa body closed around the outer edges of the figurine. Leave a small opening so that you can stuff the figurine with polyfill.
  8. Stuff the jawa and sew the small opening closed.
  9. Put the robe on your jawa. Tape the black construction paper around it's body to hold the robe closed and serve as his equipment belt.
 
 
 




Posted by amypelman on 04/22/13

 
 
Those of you who follow us in Instagram and Twitter (*hint hint* for those who don't we're: Hub500) might have seen the photo above already.  Last night I was just on the couch in my pjs and I decided to do something I'd been thinking about for a while: wrapping my earbuds. I hate the way they get tangled in my bag, and I heard this might help.  Plus it makes them look better!  It works on all sorts of cables, not just earbuds.  Want to do it?  All you need is some scissors and embroidery floss.  You can get embroidery floss at needlepoint stores and craft stores like Michael's.  I experimented with thin yarn last night too, but I liked the way the embroidery floss looked better.  Anywho, if you already know how to make friendship bracelets, you're pretty much set.  If not, just watch this quick video to see how to do it:   
Tweet or tag us if you do it! 
 




Posted by mkrueger on 04/19/13

April saw an interesting DIY! We learned how to solder electronics together to create personalized flashlights from mint tins! You can view a gallery below of the event.
 
 
Couldn't make the program? Don't Fret! You can read the instructions to create your own mint tin flashlight, courtesy of the ever amazing Instructables.com.