Posted by Trixie on 09/12/14

 
Last month the library launched a community-wide reading program: One Book, One Village! This fall we'll rally around the book Ordinary Grace written by William Kent Krueger. Besides reading and discussing, teens can participate in other ways. There are programs you can attend over the next couple of months including an author visit. In the Hub, we'll have One Book, One Village related drop-in activities and contests.
 
Stop by and join the conversation!
 
SEPTEMBER
  • LEGOsota 1961
    Stop by the Hub and help us recreate New Bremen using LEGOs. Drop in.
  • youD 3D Contest
    What object or symbol from Ordinary Grace do you think best represents the book? Post to any of our social media pages with the tag #youD3D or email us at teens@ahml.info. Make suggestions for participants to 3D model at the youD 3D program on Monday, October 27th. If your object is selected, get a 3D print of your suggestion!

OCTOBER

  • DIY Dog Tags
    Make your very own military dog tags in the Hub. Drop in.
  • Photo Reenact
    Reenact a scene from Ordinary Grace and post to one of our social media accounts with the tag #OBOVphoto or email us at teens@ahml.info for a chance to win.
 




Posted by Trixie on 06/27/14

 
Yesterday, we learned some basic movie-making principles and explored the equipment and resources the library has to offer. Then, each team was given a filming assignment with specific instructions to hone their visual thinking skills. Here's one of the videos that resulted: the challenge was to film a subject ascending and descending stairs. Heather H., Lynette H., and Emma K., great job!
 
 
Want to learn more about film-making? Come into the Hub for help with your film, to use video editing software, or to check out cameras, tripods, and more!
 
We're accepting submissions for the 8th Annual Film Fest! Get the specs and register for upcoming film-making class here.




Posted by emather on 05/29/14

This past Saturday, teens met in the Training Center at the library to use video editing and effects tools to add Star Wars special effects to some videos. We started with footage of some Star Wars finger puppets (made as part of the DIY craft in the HUB this month) in front of a green screen, like this:
 
 
 
 
Then we used a new tool on library computers called SaberFX that let us draw different visual effects over the footage, like light sabers, blasters, explosions, and lightning. Then we rendered those videos and used iMovie to edit them, add backgrounds over the green screen, and add music and sound effects. We ended up with some pretty great quick videos with really creative ideas. (I don't know if Jabba the Hutt will be able to shoot lightning out of his eyeballs in the new movies, but he really should.) Check some out below, and be sure to come by and try out the software yourself. Maybe for your submission to the 8th Annual Teen Film Fest?
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 




Posted by alice on 05/19/14

Think back on the year. In 2013/2014 what video game has made the biggest impact?
 
The arguable answer: Flappy Bird.
 
Sadly, it's no longer available in the App Store because the developer decided it was too addicting. But if you've never played before, you may be in luck. It looks like Flappy Bird may be coming back in an official way. Multiplayer Flappy Bird? WHAT?!
 
When Flappy Bird went away in February, there were a zillion (may be an overestimation) Flappy Bird clones made to fill the void. At the Use the Force: Code Your Own Video Game program, we created one of these clones and STAR WARS-ed it!
 
We created the game using a program called Construct 2 which you can download for free! The tutorial for making a Flappy Bird clone for Construct 2 can be found here.
 
 
We started out using an X-Wing in place of a bird, and Death Star pipes in place of Flappy Bird pipes.
 
And then we went Star Wars happy on all the different sprites....
 
 
 
 
Be careful, Boba Fett! Beware of the giant Chewies!
 
Want more Star Wars?
Come make a Chewbacca, Yoda, Darth Vader, C3PO and Jabba the Hutt finger puppet in The Hub's DIY area!
 




Posted by Trixie on 02/05/14

February is "heart the library" month and we're celebrating in the Hub!
 
Come out and up-cycle an old book or make a book-based paper craft. There are many different project ideas in books we've checked out for the Hub (like The Repurposed Library and Art Made From Booksor come up with your own project!
 
DIY book mobile
 
We even have a photo booth for you to pose with your favorite item from the library's collection or something you made in the Hub. Take one copy of the picture home with you and leave the other here telling everyone why YOU heart the library!
 




Posted by amypelman on 12/08/13

 
Last week 13 teens got together to create culinary candy masterpieces!  How did they do it? 
 
They were given a very quick tutorial on how to make a sushi roll (check out this tutorial for an example), supplied with a lot of rice crispy treats and candy ingredients, and set loose to create!  
 
Here is what they had to work with:
 
Instead of this regular sushi ingredient   /   they had this candy sushi ingredient:
 
Rice   /  Rice Crispy Treats - instead of a dish, I molded them into thin sheets using a jelly roll pan.
Seaweed /  Fruit Roll-Ups, Fruit-by-the-Foot, sour strips
Fish / Swedish Fish, gummy worms, gummy bears
Fish eggs (Roe) / Nerds, Red Hots
 
I also supplied pretty little clear plastic plates, cellophane, ribbon and origami paper to wrap up the sushi rolls into beautiful packages. This way, teens could give them away as nice gifts... that is, if they didn't eat them all first! 
 
 
programs




Posted by Trixie on 11/15/13

We’re celebrating WHOvember all month long in the Hub!
 

If you missed last week’s Sonic Screwdriver program, here are the instructions so you can DIY!
 
What you need:
From the dollar store, a package of 3 highlighters, an LED clip-on reading light, and black electrical tape. You’ll also need paint, markers, or colored tape to color your finished Sonic Screwdriver.
Tools: utility knife or something to cut plastic with and pliers.
 
 
 
 
1. Choose which highlighter you would like as the main portion of your Sonic Screwdriver. Remove inky bits from this highlighter.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. Next, you’ll prepare the three highlighter caps for the project. Choose which cap you would like for the light-up end of your Sonic Screwdriver and set it aside. Cut off the tips of the other two caps.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Use tape to connect the cap you set aside and one of the other caps.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. Inventory your parts: you should have the pieces pictured on the left. Now, you’re ready to add the LED to your Sonic Screwdriver.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Carefully, insert LED through the marker top. You will need to use pliers to widen the opening. Connect the piece with the taped together marker caps and continue to feed the LED through.
 
6. Add the remaining cap to the end of the marker.
 
 
 
7. Finally, use paint, Sharpies, and/or duct and electrical tape to put the finishing touches on your Sonic Screwdriver.
 
8. Now, get out there and foil some sinister plots!
 
Project adapted from sparknotes.
 
 
fandom, program




Posted by Trixie on 10/30/13

Last Friday we gathered in the Hub to construct freaky, mutant toys. Using old toys, needle & thread, LEDs, duct tape, and anything else we could find, we took apart and fashioned toys Dr. Frankenstein would be proud of! A few of the teens brought their critters to life as marionettes.
 
Browse the pictures to see some of the creepy creations the teens came up with!
 
program, sciencey




Posted by alice on 08/13/13

 
Any avid gamers out there?  Well you may like to play video games and you may even boast a high score or two, but have you ever thought about how video games are made?  Better yet, have you ever considered making one of your own?
 
At Saturday's DIY program, a group of teens had a chance to make their own video games using a software called Construct 2.  We met up in the library's Training Center and created a simple game using the software together.  Afterwards, the teens had time to make whatever modifications and additions they wanted — effectively creating some seriously bizarre and fun games that other attendees got to try out.
 
Want a shot at making your own video game?  Download the software we used onto your Windows PC and take a look at this tutorial that'll go through the steps to get you started!
 
Below is a short clip of a teen playing the game he created.  And yes, that's a unicorn shooting a laser out of its horn.
 
 
If you're really interested in making video games in the future (maybe even as a CAREER!), you might be interested in checking out this book from our collection!
 




Posted by Trixie on 07/23/13

On Friday, we 3D scanned, modeled, and printed portraits for 16 teens in the library's Marketplace. Don't know much about 3D printing? Basically, a digital model can be "printed" into a three-dimensional, solid object using this technology. Here's an infographic and a video that explains the process.
 
Jesse DePinto from Voxel Metric, Inc. was here to scan and 3D model the participants' heads. Check out the gallery of 3D models - you can get a 360° view of the busts that were printed!
 
 
Andrew Morrison from Workshop 88 joined us to demo his Makerbot Replicator 2 and 3D print the portraits.
 
AHML's own resident maker Chris Krueger (aka The New Hobbyist) showed off some of his prints and answered audience questions too!
 
Below is a video recap of the program. You can check out more video and photos from the program on the Digifii website.