Posted by Trixie on 02/05/14

February is "heart the library" month and we're celebrating in the Hub!
 
Come out and up-cycle an old book or make a book-based paper craft. There are many different project ideas in books we've checked out for the Hub (like The Repurposed Library and Art Made From Booksor come up with your own project!
 
DIY book mobile
 
We even have a photo booth for you to pose with your favorite item from the library's collection or something you made in the Hub. Take one copy of the picture home with you and leave the other here telling everyone why YOU heart the library!
 




Posted by amypelman on 12/08/13

 
Last week 13 teens got together to create culinary candy masterpieces!  How did they do it? 
 
They were given a very quick tutorial on how to make a sushi roll (check out this tutorial for an example), supplied with a lot of rice crispy treats and candy ingredients, and set loose to create!  
 
Here is what they had to work with:
 
Instead of this regular sushi ingredient   /   they had this candy sushi ingredient:
 
Rice   /  Rice Crispy Treats - instead of a dish, I molded them into thin sheets using a jelly roll pan.
Seaweed /  Fruit Roll-Ups, Fruit-by-the-Foot, sour strips
Fish / Swedish Fish, gummy worms, gummy bears
Fish eggs (Roe) / Nerds, Red Hots
 
I also supplied pretty little clear plastic plates, cellophane, ribbon and origami paper to wrap up the sushi rolls into beautiful packages. This way, teens could give them away as nice gifts... that is, if they didn't eat them all first! 
 
 
programs




Posted by Trixie on 11/15/13

We’re celebrating WHOvember all month long in the Hub!
 

If you missed last week’s Sonic Screwdriver program, here are the instructions so you can DIY!
 
What you need:
From the dollar store, a package of 3 highlighters, an LED clip-on reading light, and black electrical tape. You’ll also need paint, markers, or colored tape to color your finished Sonic Screwdriver.
Tools: utility knife or something to cut plastic with and pliers.
 
 
 
 
1. Choose which highlighter you would like as the main portion of your Sonic Screwdriver. Remove inky bits from this highlighter.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. Next, you’ll prepare the three highlighter caps for the project. Choose which cap you would like for the light-up end of your Sonic Screwdriver and set it aside. Cut off the tips of the other two caps.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Use tape to connect the cap you set aside and one of the other caps.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. Inventory your parts: you should have the pieces pictured on the left. Now, you’re ready to add the LED to your Sonic Screwdriver.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Carefully, insert LED through the marker top. You will need to use pliers to widen the opening. Connect the piece with the taped together marker caps and continue to feed the LED through.
 
6. Add the remaining cap to the end of the marker.
 
 
 
7. Finally, use paint, Sharpies, and/or duct and electrical tape to put the finishing touches on your Sonic Screwdriver.
 
8. Now, get out there and foil some sinister plots!
 
Project adapted from sparknotes.
 
 
fandom, program




Posted by Trixie on 10/30/13

Last Friday we gathered in the Hub to construct freaky, mutant toys. Using old toys, needle & thread, LEDs, duct tape, and anything else we could find, we took apart and fashioned toys Dr. Frankenstein would be proud of! A few of the teens brought their critters to life as marionettes.
 
Browse the pictures to see some of the creepy creations the teens came up with!
 
program, sciencey




Posted by alice on 08/13/13

 
Any avid gamers out there?  Well you may like to play video games and you may even boast a high score or two, but have you ever thought about how video games are made?  Better yet, have you ever considered making one of your own?
 
At Saturday's DIY program, a group of teens had a chance to make their own video games using a software called Construct 2.  We met up in the library's Training Center and created a simple game using the software together.  Afterwards, the teens had time to make whatever modifications and additions they wanted — effectively creating some seriously bizarre and fun games that other attendees got to try out.
 
Want a shot at making your own video game?  Download the software we used onto your Windows PC and take a look at this tutorial that'll go through the steps to get you started!
 
Below is a short clip of a teen playing the game he created.  And yes, that's a unicorn shooting a laser out of its horn.
 
 
If you're really interested in making video games in the future (maybe even as a CAREER!), you might be interested in checking out this book from our collection!
 




Posted by Trixie on 07/23/13

On Friday, we 3D scanned, modeled, and printed portraits for 16 teens in the library's Marketplace. Don't know much about 3D printing? Basically, a digital model can be "printed" into a three-dimensional, solid object using this technology. Here's an infographic and a video that explains the process.
 
Jesse DePinto from Voxel Metric, Inc. was here to scan and 3D model the participants' heads. Check out the gallery of 3D models - you can get a 360° view of the busts that were printed!
 
 
Andrew Morrison from Workshop 88 joined us to demo his Makerbot Replicator 2 and 3D print the portraits.
 
AHML's own resident maker Chris Krueger (aka The New Hobbyist) showed off some of his prints and answered audience questions too!
 
Below is a video recap of the program. You can check out more video and photos from the program on the Digifii website.
 




Posted by amypelman on 07/16/13

 
What do all your t-shirts, cool canvas bags, and concert posters have in common?  The images most likely got on all those things using the method known as screen printing (sometimes also called silk screen).  This is a technique where the printer pushes ink through a mesh screen onto the fabric or paper. An image is exposed onto the screen (or is placed underneath it) creating a stencil that can be used over and over again.  Last Friday the ink was flying in the D.I.Y. space in The Hub.  First teens tried their hand at printing posters using a pre-made screen with the Hub logo on it.  We got perfect prints, reading for framing! Then everyone designed their very own simple paper stencil to print.  Great artwork and a fun time was had by all! 
 
 
Interested in trying your hand at screen printing?  Since we have these great screens in The Hub, we will definitely be offering more opportunities to come in and try it.  In the meantime, there are kits you can buy to do screen printing at home.  Here is a nice overview of the process:
 
The screen printing program kicked off our very own version of Google+ Maker Camp!  Stop on by the Hub to pick up a pin and some stickers and sign-up to try out something interesting like "squishy circuits" and soldering a blinky robot pin!  
 




Posted by alice on 07/02/13

 
Who doesn't enjoy receiving a greeting card?  Birthday cards, Get Well cards, Just Sayin' Hello cards... they can all put a smile on the recipient's face.  
 
The greeting cards we created on Saturday at the DIY: LED Greeting Cards program must've put a huge, toothy smile on some special recipient's face then.  We used Bare Paint conductive ink, a battery, LEDs, and some knowledge of circuitry to create greeting cards that light up!
 
Missed the program or need a re-cap?  You can find the instructions on how to create your own LED Greeting Cards below, or, you can purchase a kit from sparkfun.com
 
1. Use the robot templates that come with the kit or create your own design on a blank paper.
2. Cut off a small strip of paper. This will be used for the “switch” later on.
3. Use the push pin to punch holes for the battery and LED prongs.
4. Trace the black lines on the templates (if using the robot drawings) with the Bare Paint pen.
5. WAIT FOR THE INK TO DRY!!!!
6. Place the battery into one of the pairs of holes and the LED into the other. Flatten them out at a 90 degree angle.
7. Make sure that the legs match, long LED leg to long battery leg and the same for the short legs.
8. Remember that strip of paper from step 2?  We’re using it now.  Glue it to the spot shown in the picture. This is how the “circuit” will be completed.
9. Add a blob of ink to the switch and wait for it to dry.
10. To turn it on simply press the switch down to complete the circuit!
 
As always, if you have any questions on this program, feel free to drop by The Hub and ask one of our staff!
 
DIY, programs




Posted by Trixie on 06/13/13

 
We’re launching another activity in the Hub: the Take Apart Cart!

The Make It summer program is in full swing - we’ve signed up over 170 teens and some participants have already earned 2 of the 3 required stamps to be a finisher. Here’s another activity that can earn you a MAKER stamp.

An important step in making something is understanding how it works: the mechanics, the components used, design based on function, etc. A great way to learn about how something works is to thoughtfully take it apart or unmake it. Without further ado, we’d like to introduce the Hub’s Take Apart Cart: a library cart overflowing with old tech and other stuff for you to take apart and learn from! Join us in the DIY area, Monday-Friday between 2-4 p.m. The Cart, tools, and staff will be available for your unmaking needs. Learn about how a clock works or what components go into making a laptop.

What will we do with the pieces you've taken apart? You can either try to remake it or repurpose the parts to make something new. Hopefully, this has piqued your interest enough to come check out what we have for you to unmake beginning on Monday, June 17th.




Posted by mkrueger on 06/03/13

For May we had a DIY project that was a bit of a throwback, string art. String art has been around since the early 19th century but didn't really become popularized until the 1960's. Using cork board, some map pins, and embroidery floss you can create really interesting mathematical and other geometric designs. You can see a gallery below of what our attendees created.
 
 
Would you like to create your own string art? Take a look at the video below to find out how!