Posted by alice on 07.16.13

First things first, watch the video below!
 
 
Did you ever think you'd be scared of Mary Poppins?  I mean, I guess she does make the Banks children eat gross tasting medicine (which is a scary prospect for anyone), but she usually follows that with a spoon full of sugar.  The Mary Poppins in the video above doesn't seem like the type to be sweet nor sweeten.
 
At Cut and Re-Cut, a program we had in the Training Center last Thursday, teens came in and created their own re-cut trailers for popular movies.  They had the choice between making Monsters Inc. into a horror movie or The Hunger Games into a rom-com.  Using some iMovie know-how, appropriate clips/music for our purposes, and SERIOUS creativity, the teens delivered great trailers!
 
You can view them in the playlist below!
 

 
Also, remember to check out our programs calendar for more awesome programs in the future!
 




Posted by amypelman on 07.16.13

 
What do all your t-shirts, cool canvas bags, and concert posters have in common?  The images most likely got on all those things using the method known as screen printing (sometimes also called silk screen).  This is a technique where the printer pushes ink through a mesh screen onto the fabric or paper. An image is exposed onto the screen (or is placed underneath it) creating a stencil that can be used over and over again.  Last Friday the ink was flying in the D.I.Y. space in The Hub.  First teens tried their hand at printing posters using a pre-made screen with the Hub logo on it.  We got perfect prints, reading for framing! Then everyone designed their very own simple paper stencil to print.  Great artwork and a fun time was had by all! 
 
 
Interested in trying your hand at screen printing?  Since we have these great screens in The Hub, we will definitely be offering more opportunities to come in and try it.  In the meantime, there are kits you can buy to do screen printing at home.  Here is a nice overview of the process:
 
The screen printing program kicked off our very own version of Google+ Maker Camp!  Stop on by the Hub to pick up a pin and some stickers and sign-up to try out something interesting like "squishy circuits" and soldering a blinky robot pin!  
 
DIY




Posted by alice on 07.12.13

I had to hijack Alice's account to share the following with all you teen readers out there:
 
Have you ever found yourself searching for the perfect word...and the word just doesn't exist? Especially when talking about books and your reading experiences? Kudos to YALSA Hub blogger Joel Bruns, whose list of YA lit vocab made me laugh but also nod my head and say "yep." Check these out (and start dropping them into your conversations with us in the AHML Hub):
 
Catastrafatigue: the feeling that one more catastrophe-riddled future world is more than you can stand
 
Seqhole: the empty feeling you get when you are waiting for the next book in a series to be released
 
Skimulate: pretending you’ve read a book when, in fact, you skimmed the back cover and maybe a few pages from each chapter. Also: bibliofake.
 
Errorist: person incapable of seeing anything but the weaknesses of every book they read
 
Lust Jacket: cover design that is so awesome you just can’t help but pick up the book. Antonym: bust jacket: a cover that makes you go “ewwww.”
 
Melodramamine: the feeling you get after gorging on drama-filled books
 
Supernaturillogical: when a writer endows a character in a book with special powers that are just ridiculous and/or unbelievable and/or just plain stupid
 
Dittopia: oh boy, another book set in a crumbling future America
 
Zombifad: right now
 
Afictionado: no, I don’t want to read your fan fiction of The Hunger Games from the point of view of Prim’s goat
 
Shock and Awwww: when you are dreading a book, read it anyway, and end up loving it
 
Check out Joel Brun's blog post here!
 
-Mary Ellen
 
geekout, wordplay




Posted by alice on 07.09.13

 
Oh my tweet!  We had some great submissions for the Tweet a Tale contest for June.  You ladies and gents did not have much space to write, but you all dared us to read in between the lines and get so much out of just 120 characters!  Kudos to everyone!  BUT... we can only have two winners, folks.
 
Behold... the winning tweets below!  Congrats!
 
For Best Comedy Story
 
For Best Horror Story
 
Want another shot at one of our contests? You're in luck! Check out this Photo Scavenger Hunt that's happening now and win another spectacular prize!
 




Posted by amypelman on 07.08.13

 
This week we have a special review from Joe in the Programs Department.  And guess what?  The author Leslie Stella will be here on August 7th for a book discussion of her recent book, followed by a DIY 'zine workshop.
Sign up here!  Then come to the Hub to pick up your copy of the book!!
 
 
Permanent Record by Leslie Stella
 
Permanent Record is tight, compelling, heartwarming, funny, and credibly set in Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood. Teens will flip for this book. It truly speaks their language, but not through an overuse of slang or idiotic text-speak--it speaks their emotional language. Stella somehow successfully channels the cross-cultural voice of an Iranian-American teenage boy, and the peek inside his head is sure to resonate tremendously with teens (and adults, who were once teens themselves) everywhere. This book unflinchingly takes on some of the heaviest aspects of growing up--feeling like an outsider, struggling to figure out one's place in the world, wrestling with new emotions and maturing relationships, the nature of respect--and deftly presents them with honesty, and even a little hope. 
 
Name:  Joe C.
Department:  Programs
Years at AHML:  almost 1
Favorite thing I do at work: Transform ideas into live programs
Best place to Read my book:  on the train
Why I like reading YA:  It helps me stay connected to what’s happening now for young people
 
 
ITBA




Posted by alice on 07.02.13

 
Who doesn't enjoy receiving a greeting card?  Birthday cards, Get Well cards, Just Sayin' Hello cards... they can all put a smile on the recipient's face.  
 
The greeting cards we created on Saturday at the DIY: LED Greeting Cards program must've put a huge, toothy smile on some special recipient's face then.  We used Bare Paint conductive ink, a battery, LEDs, and some knowledge of circuitry to create greeting cards that light up!
 
Missed the program or need a re-cap?  You can find the instructions on how to create your own LED Greeting Cards below, or, you can purchase a kit from sparkfun.com
 
1. Use the robot templates that come with the kit or create your own design on a blank paper.
2. Cut off a small strip of paper. This will be used for the “switch” later on.
3. Use the push pin to punch holes for the battery and LED prongs.
4. Trace the black lines on the templates (if using the robot drawings) with the Bare Paint pen.
5. WAIT FOR THE INK TO DRY!!!!
6. Place the battery into one of the pairs of holes and the LED into the other. Flatten them out at a 90 degree angle.
7. Make sure that the legs match, long LED leg to long battery leg and the same for the short legs.
8. Remember that strip of paper from step 2?  We’re using it now.  Glue it to the spot shown in the picture. This is how the “circuit” will be completed.
9. Add a blob of ink to the switch and wait for it to dry.
10. To turn it on simply press the switch down to complete the circuit!
 
As always, if you have any questions on this program, feel free to drop by The Hub and ask one of our staff!
 
DIY, DIY, programs




Posted by amypelman on 07.01.13

 
 
Last Saturday these 3 awesome Arlington Heights teens, Tessa, Rosalie, and Elizabeth attended the American Library Association conference in downtown Chicago. There they joined over 50 teens from all different areas to present their opinions on some of the books nominated for the esteemed Best Fiction for Young Adults list.  They stood in front of the microphone and presented their well-thought-out and insightful opinions about books like, The Fifth Wave, Dark TriumphEleanor & Park, and Unremembered, among several others.  All the while publishers, authors, and librarians paid close attention to what they were saying.  Here's Elizabeth standing at the microphone talking about one the books she read:   
 
  
As a fun reward, the girls were treated to a pizza lunch given by the Penguin Publishing House.  They heard an amazing panel of authors speak about their craft and took home gift bags full of books.  Then they got to visit the huge exhibit hall!  
 
A great time was had by all!  If you are interested in getting involved with book club and becoming a Teen Book Reviewer at AHML, let me know!  You can contact me at: apelman@ahml.info  
 
 




Posted by amypelman on 06.24.13

 
Books open doors, expand your mind, and provide insight into experiences that you might never have otherwise.  It's the original "edutainment!" (that's education and entertainment combined).  We are lucky in this day and age because we have an additional avenue for edutainment, it's the interwebs!  You might already know about John and Hank green's Vlog brothers and Crash Course videos which are informative and very entertaining.  Here are a few more video channels that are fun, funny, interesting, thought-provoking all while being extremely EDUCATIONAL!!  (Yeah I said it. In the summer no less!). 
 
The host poses really crazy cool questions like "Is the Universe a Computer?" and "Is twitter the Newest Form of Literature?" then attempts to answer them in a matter of a few minutes.
 
 
Have a burning science question and don't have time to start from scratch with atoms and neurons?  ASAP Science might have already put together a little video to de-mystify even the most difficult brain chemistry! 
 
Another good video channel where interesting and seemingly unknowable ideas are explored and explained.  The creator Michael Stevens went to the University of Chicago!  
 
Thinker is great because it is a mash up of content and you never know what kinds of strange and interesting videos will pop up! 
 
They say you never stop learning.  As someone who is older and wiser than... some other people, I can say with complete confidence that it's true, you don't.  But why would you want to?  Anyway, do you get your edutainment fix somewhere else besides the sites mentioned above?  Let me know about it in the comments! 
 
 




Posted by Trixie on 06.16.13

 
That smile of hers had tipped me off. I'd seen it more times than you could count on an abacus, and it always meant the same thing: she had an idea, something sneaky or secret; she was up to something, and any second I'd be up to something right along with her. That's how she'd always been with me. She knew I got into trouble more often than most people got out of bed, and she usually took a minute or two to remind me all about it when we were alone. But that never stopped her from egging me on, coming up with pranks or stunts I could pull just for the hell of it, convincing me to do them.
 
 
 
 
 
Eugene “Huge” Smalls doesn’t have much going for him. He’s middle schooler whose reputation as a violent troublemaker precedes him. His teachers have written him off and even his family seems to be working against him. Except for his dear grandmother, who supported him through his tribulations and introduced him to important role models that helped shape who he is today: Philip Marlowe, Sam Spade, and of course, Sherlock Holmes. So, you may have guessed it…this is a coming-of-age, mystery novel. Set in 1980s, suburban New Jersey, Huge finds himself in the midst of investigating a mystery that seems to be getting him into more trouble than it’s worth. Just as he is getting to the bottom of it, he must decide between solving the mystery and losing his precious, teenage freedom.

Fuerst creates a credible and witty character in Huge. He taps into the volatile and impulsive psyche of a lonely, middle school outcast. Huge’s character has a distinct hard-boiled detective feel as does the tone of the novel. A black comedy and mystery with a twist, Huge explores friendship, love, family ties, and interdependence. Laugh out loud humor, a memorable protagonist, and the evocative imagery in this whodunit will engage most readers. Not one of the best books I’ve ever read, but would definitely suggest it and it’s a great summer read!

**Warning: This book contains mature themes and profanity. Suggested for readers in high school and up.**




Posted by Trixie on 06.13.13

 
We’re launching another activity in the Hub: the Take Apart Cart!

The Make It summer program is in full swing - we’ve signed up over 170 teens and some participants have already earned 2 of the 3 required stamps to be a finisher. Here’s another activity that can earn you a MAKER stamp.

An important step in making something is understanding how it works: the mechanics, the components used, design based on function, etc. A great way to learn about how something works is to thoughtfully take it apart or unmake it. Without further ado, we’d like to introduce the Hub’s Take Apart Cart: a library cart overflowing with old tech and other stuff for you to take apart and learn from! Join us in the DIY area, Monday-Friday between 2-4 p.m. The Cart, tools, and staff will be available for your unmaking needs. Learn about how a clock works or what components go into making a laptop.

What will we do with the pieces you've taken apart? You can either try to remake it or repurpose the parts to make something new. Hopefully, this has piqued your interest enough to come check out what we have for you to unmake beginning on Monday, June 17th.
DIY