Posts tagged with "Adults"

Posted by aharder on 01/23/18
 
Close to 500 people stopped by the library on Saturday evening to get a first look at the library’s newest traveling exhibit, XOXO: An Exhibit About Love & Forgiveness.
 
The opening night party filled the Marketplace and Kids’ World and gave partygoers of all ages the opportunity to explore the power of feelings with many family-friendly activities.
 
“It’s nice to see so many different families. So many different ages, so many different faces,” said Sheila Whiteside, who came to the party with her husband and two children. “I think [the exhibit] reminds us to come back to the basics. It reminds us of what is really important. My kids are smiling and we’re happy.”
 
The main attraction of the night was the debut of XOXO. Families couldn’t get enough of exploring the different parts of this hands-on exhibit. Some popular activities included Holding Hands, which allows people to hold hands to get a memorable quote to appear; Talk to Someone, where families can communicate with one another using telephones set up in the library; and Release the Negative, an activity where participants can write down negative feelings and send them into a paper shredder.
 
“There’s a lot of things you can do here with people that you love and care about,” said nine-year-old Kanon Koshino as she got ready to send a photo she drew of a thunderstorm into Release the Negative’s paper shredder. “You can show how you feel angry, sad and happy.”
 
Attendees also visited the Hub for button making and yarn art activities, the Training Center for a virtual Google Expedition to Paris and Kids’ World for a scavenger hunt, storytimes and arts and crafts.
 
Another highlight of the evening that impressed partygoers was an hour-long performance from Istvan & His Imaginary Band that kept children engaged with bubbles, tambourines and fun music. Istvan performed in the Hendrickson Room to an enthusiastic crowd, which included Tracy Brooks and her three children.
 
“[XOXO] is great, it’s keeping the kids active and giving them unique things to see and touch,” Brooks said. “I like that [Istvan & His Imaginary Band] passed out tambourines, they got to feel and touch their own instruments.”
 

Visit XOXO: An Exhibit About Love & Forgiveness during regular library hours from now to Saturday, March 31 in Kids’ World and the Marketplace. This exhibit was created by the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh with support from The Fetzer Institute and is made possible by the generous support of the Friends of the Library.

 


Posted by paichele on 01/27/15
 
How do you take an existing product and make it better? Just ask the 29 eighth graders at Thomas Middle School who recently completed a new, 9-week elective focused on three-dimensional printing, research and design. Titled 3D RD, the first-time course challenged the students to create or redesign every day products using 3D technology resources available both at school and at the library including Tinkercad, an online design application, and the Hub’s MakerBot 3D printer.

The course culminated on January 20 when the students presented their final 3D projects before an audience of some 50 parents and teachers. Thomas Middle School Principal Brian Kaye emceed the program which was held in the Hub. Students presented ideas and 3D models that ranged from a clever set of interchangeable scissors handles, designed by Arlington Heights students Zoe Axelrod and Annie Waz, to an always in demand TV remote holder.

“Give me a show of hands, how many of you guys have lost your remotes,” asked Emil Harb and Michael Macynski, the student engineers of a sleekly-designed TV remote holder. “This is the item that shall fulfill your needs!”

In all 12 groups of students presented and displayed their printed 3D prototypes at the library.

“The kids were really well-prepared,” says Teen Services Supervisor Tom Spicer, who worked with the District 25 students. “It was really great to see that they were able to start using the modeling software to design and print workable prototypes and products.”

“It was really gratifying to see the students present their final products,” added Jim Grant, Thomas Middle School industrial technology teacher and creator of the class. “It was fun trying something new, and it was great working with the Hub staff. The teamwork between the school and library provided enhanced learning for the students and resulted in some really innovative and creative 3D products.”

Thomas Middle School will offer 3D RD in the spring with a new class starting in April.

Posted by aharder on 05/15/18
 
“My cerebral palsy affects my speech and mobility but not my spirit.” In 12 short words, Arlington Heights resident Esther Lee gives voice to her life’s work: disability law attorney, president of Able Community—a nonprofit housing improving independence for people with disabilities, and writer and creator of poetry with a purpose.

“Common themes of my poetry are home, or longing for home, and belonging, or in most cases not belonging,” Lee shared in an email.

 
It was a love for writing poetry that led her to explore Writer’s Ink, the library’s monthly meeting for local writers. Lee, who graduated from Thomas Middle School, holds a Juris Doctor degree from the University of California Davis, School of Law, focusing on civil rights and public interest law. She also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, having graduated with honors and an emphasis on creative writing.
 
“I was used to workshopping my poetry with classmates as a rhetoric major in college, but I wasn’t sure what to expect from this group at a public library,” Lee shared. “I was apprehensive (at first), especially being one of the youngest writers there and a poet in a room full of fiction writers. Fortunately, everyone has always been welcoming.” 
 
Lee has been participating in Writer’s Ink for about a year. At a Wednesday evening meet-up, she and seven other aspiring writers gathered with writing coach and facilitator Jacob Knabb around a conference room table to share their latest work. Earlier in the day, Lee had emailed Knabb her poem, “There’s An Elephant Living Upstairs,” so that he could read it aloud to the group for critique. She listened attentively and through a computer-activated voice assistance device asked the group if they thought the ending was ‘too easy or too in your face?’
 
I like the abruptness of it, “Knabb assured her. “It’s lovely broken into verse, quite perfect in that shape.”

“Jacob always strives to give us feedback to improve our writing,” Esther shared following the meeting. “I haven’t worked with many fiction writers, so I am learning more about narrative and memoirs, as there are a lot of memoirists in the group.”

 
“Esther makes them feel a comradery, there’s a certain comfort there,” Knabb added while reflecting on the dynamics of the group. “Her poetry is honest and real and explores topics that allow others in the group to open up.”
 
Find an upcoming Writer's Ink meeting to join on our calendar
 

Posted by aharder on 05/15/18
 
The library’s new subscription to PressReader offers access to thousands of newspapers and magazines from around the world and in dozens of languages – from daily issues of The Chicago Tribune and Sun-Times to India’s Hindustan Times and Magazine Futbol Tactico from Argentina. To learn more visit PressReader here

Posted by aharder on 02/13/17

The library was bustling with activity this weekend with a record-breaking number of visitors coming to see the amazing one-of-a-kind creations of the Northern Illinois LEGO Train Club on exhibit in the Hendrickson Room. More than 6,200 guests visited the exhibit Saturday and Sunday. Eleven train club members spent six hours assembling the main display. In addition to the Hendrickson exhibit, the library offered LEGO Club in the Marketplace, with large crowds on both days making models then displaying them at the library. Thanks to everyone who stopped by for all the LEGO fun! More photos in our Facebook gallery here. 

Posted by paichele on 01/15/18
 
Close to 100 Arlington Heights residents and students from the High School District 214 Newcomer Center experienced the art of community service on Monday, January 15 by working together at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library to create a large three-panel mural honoring the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Under the guidance of renowned local artist Gino Savarino, participants of all ages gathered in the library’s Cardinal Room to paint during one of the three 90-minute sessions.
 
“It’s like a giant coloring book, just paint and stay in the lines,” said Savarino as he welcomed participants. “I’ll be there to guide you every step of the way.”
 
Throughout the day, participants took turns applying bright swaths of color and painted side-by-side, filling in the canvases that were designed by Savarino to convey a pop art feel and include images that reflect Dr. King’s legacy and symbols of Arlington Heights. 
 
“The goal was to provide an opportunity for the community to come together to honor Dr. King’s legacy and to work together to create something that will be a lasting legacy,” said Angela Jones, the library’s Community Engagement Liaison.
 
Among the participants were 25 students from the Newcomer Center, District 214’s facility that prepares students who are new to the United States to successfully transition to their home high schools. The students, both current and former, represented five countries.
 
“What are your dreams for the future?” asked Newcomer Center Coordinator Mario Perez to the students and residents who gathered. Perez, one of the event organizers, encouraged students and residents to share personal experiences and family stories of immigration in small group discussions between painting sessions.
 
“Being able to participate in something where you are part of the whole is so important,” said Arlington Heights resident Julie Kurka, who brought her 11-year-old sixth-grader to the library to paint on her day off of school. “Rather than just doing for yourself, it’s nice to do more and give back.”
 
The completed mural was on display in the library during February and will eventually be permanently hung at the Newcomer Center, which is housed at the Forest View Educational Center in Arlington Heights. The event organizers plan to bring the mural to local schools and other community locations in the coming months. Watch the video below to see the mural coming together. 
 
 

Posted by paichele on 08/18/16
 
To prepare for the start of the school year, nearly 40 new teachers to Arlington Heights School District 25 visited the library on August 18 and learned firsthand about resources available to teachers, how to request classroom materials and about upcoming library programs that will enhance student learning beyond the classroom. 
 
Following a before-hours tour of the library, District 25 Superintendent Dr. Lori Bein welcomed the group to the Hub where they also heard  a special presentation by the library's School Services Coordinator (K-8) Julie Jurgens. The teachers participated in two breakout sessions and also had time to explore on their own to learn about services like 3D printing and educational databases.
 
This is the third year that District 25 partnered with the library as part of their new teacher orientation. District 25 is comprised of seven elementary schools and two middle schools in Arlington Heights. The first day of student attendance is Monday, August 29. 

Posted by paichele on 04/27/15

Close to 100 residents gathered at the library on Wednesday night, April 29, for the second annual State of the Village. Leaders from eight governmental entities, including Arlington Heights Mayor Tom Hayes, pictured, participated in the community conversation. Each took to the stage and presented current projects and significant developments that impact the village, area schools and park district.
 
The library presented a video featuring highlights of the past year. Audience members were also the first to learn the library's 2015 One Book, One Village book selection - The Book of Unknown Americans, by Chicago author Christina Henríquez. Executive Director Jason Kuhl announced this year's choice and invited everyone to join in the library's second community read. Following the presentations, attendees were invited to meet and ask questions of community representatives.
 
Read about State of the Village in the Daily Herald.  The event will also be broadcast on Channel 6 on WideOpenWest, Channel 17 on Comcast and Channel 99 on U-Verse or watch here now.

Posted by mhastings on 10/27/17
 

Opening remarks from Debbie Smart, Board of Library Trustees President
Arlington Heights Memorial Library Committee of the Whole meeting, October 30, 2017

Welcome to tonight’s Committee of the Whole meeting, used by board and staff as a tool for planning and communication. It is transparent in nature so that the community is aware of upcoming projects, priorities, issues and business decisions. No official business will be approved or voted on tonight.

Over the last several weeks, inaccurate information has been circulating, which the board wishes to address:
 
1. At no time did the board direct staff to cancel the immigration programming. Staff made the proper decision to do so as safety concerns arose for both staff and potential participants. In fact, the Library Board reaffirmed our support of the immigration programming at our September 25, 2017 board meeting.
 
2. On January 17, 2017, the Board amended the Arlington Heights Memorial Library Vision and Values to reflect diversity and inclusion as part of our institutional values. We support free and equal access for all. Task forces were started by staff to address audience development, south side resident inclusion and expanding services for people with disabilities.
 
3. This summer, our board fully supported our Inspiring Understanding and Build a Better World initiatives by attending programming and participating in workshops.
 
4. During February and May, the board approved budget amendments adding the following resources:
 
• A grant and development position to apply for new revenue streams to support initiatives
• A community engagement liaison to better identify community needs.
• A bilingual specialty services advisor for our Hispanic community’s needs.
 
All of these positions help better serve the underserved and to assist in gauging our community’s current needs.
 
5. The Board recently approved the funding for the 2018 XOXO exhibit, which highlights interactive experiences about love, understanding and forgiveness.
 
6. The library board, first and foremost, serves our community.
 
As public officials, library trustees have a duty to take such actions as are reasonable to provide an efficient and well-managed library. Library trustees solely make decisions that they deem in the best interest of the community. At the end of the day, the board is ultimately responsible for the library’s performance. This board has always been very transparent in nature. However, we cannot and will not comment on any performance or personnel issues on the advice of our attorney.
 
Our board will continue to be governed by the Arlington Heights Memorial Library’s Vision and Values, library policies, those of the State of Illinois Local Library Act, guidelines from the American Library Association and American Library Association Library Bill of Rights.
 
 

 

A message to our Valued Customers and Residents from Mike Driskell, Acting Executive Director

Dear Valued Customers of Arlington Heights Memorial Library,
 
The library is currently in the midst of leadership change. We are determined to do everything we can to make the transition seamless in the eyes of our customers. We are particularly proud of all our staff at this time, especially those in roles that you interact with every day. It is important for us to continue listening to our employees and our residents so that we can emerge from these changes positively.
 

As we move forward, we will continue to follow the library’s core values, which include unparalleled customer service, free and equal access, diversity and inclusion, fiscal responsibility and a focus on the Arlington Heights Community.

 
 

 

The Board of Library Trustees meeting schedule can be found here.

 

Posted by paichele on 07/01/15
 
Thanks to everyone who turned out for Arlington Heights' annual Fourth of July parade and cheered on the library's two entries - the bookmobile and a float featuring our One Book, One Village 2015 selection, The Book of Unknown Americans. We also celebrated a special retirement along the way as bookmobile driver Al Piskorski topped off 10+ years of service behind the wheel for the library. Al drove in the parade as his final bookmobile assignment - now that's a finale!  See more parade highlights.

 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy