Posts tagged with "Adults"

Posted by aharder on 10/06/16
 
New York Times best-selling author Trenton Lee Stewart, author of the Mysterious Benedict Society series, greeted more than 100 fans in the Hendrickson Room recently and talked about his books and his life as a writer. Stewart discussed his favorite books, including Watership Down, Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh, and The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. He also talked about The Hobbit and how he wanted all of his books to be like the “Riddles in the Dark” chapter from that book. Stewart made a connection between The Lord of the Rings and his new book, The Secretkeepers, by making comparisons between the ring from Lord of the Rings and the pocket watch from The Secretkeepers and how both can make you invisible.  The audience had a good time thinking about what they could do if they were invisible for a day. Customers also enjoyed hearing about Stewart’s inspiration for the Mysterious Benedict Society and the many characters from those books.

Posted by aharder on 02/01/17
 
Need help with car diagnostics? Check out an Innova scanner from the library. The library has two Innova brand auto scanners available for checkout. These auto scanners are the same as those used by mechanics to diagnose problems that set off your check engine light. How does it work? Just plug in the scanner then turn on your car to find out whether it’s an O2 sensor, a faulty gas cap, or something else. Both scanners can be used on cars that have OBD2 technology (1996 & newer). The 3140 scanner can also scan older cars that have OBD1 technology. The 3160 can also diagnose ABS (anti-lock braking systems) and SRS (supplemental restraint systems) errors. 
 
Reserve a scanner by searching for the following items' availability in the library catalog:
 
Once you've logged into your account, you can place a hold on any item in our collection. 
 

Posted by aharder on 08/20/15
 
As part of their back to school preparations, approximately 40 new teachers to Arlington Heights School District 25 visited the Arlington Heights Memorial Library on August 20 to learn about library resources available to teachers, how to request classroom materials, upcoming author visits and fall programs students will be interested in. Teachers toured the library and heard a presentation by School Services Coordinator (K-8) Julie Jurgens.

The library serves all preschools, elementary, middle and high schools located in Arlington Heights or where Arlington Heights students make up at least 45 percent of the student body. For more information, visit http://www.ahml.info/teachers.

Posted by aharder on 09/21/16
 
On September 20, Marianthi Thanopoulos of Arlington Heights was sworn in as the newest member of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library Board of Trustees. She will serve until the next general election on April 4, 2017.
 
Thanopoulos is the Community Engagement Liaison for the Village of Mount Prospect and a documentary producer. She obtained a Masters of Arts in social sciences from the University of Chicago and a Bachelor of Arts in communications from DePaul University. She formerly served as a communication and marketing liaison for the Evanston Public Library and describes herself as an “avid reader” who “deeply understands the value that people place on Library services, programs, events and community outreach.”
 
The seven-member Board of Library Trustees sets the library’s tax levy and budget as well as library policies. Trustees are elected for six-year terms.
 

Posted by aharder on 05/17/17
On Tuesday, May 16, the newest members of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library Board of Trustees were sworn in. The seven-member Board of Library Trustees sets the library’s tax levy and budget as well as library policies. Trustees are elected for six-year terms.
 
Debbie Smart Debbie Smart has served as a trustee for six years and has held the positions of treasurer and president of the Board of Library Trustees. She is a member of the Rotary Club of Arlington Heights, Arlington Heights Historical Society, Questers, Kappa Delta Sorority, Arlington Heights Art Commission, St. John UCC Church and the Chamber of Commerce. She was a recipient of the 2014 Hearts of Gold Award for volunteering.
 
Debbie Smart John Supplitt is the senior director of constituency sections for the American Hospital Association. He has 25 years of experience with staffing of and participating on national non-profit boards and panels. Supplitt has a Bachelor of Science from Georgetown University and master’s degrees in public administration from New York University and business administration from Loyola University of Chicago.
 
Debbie Smart Christine C. Tangney is a professor in clinical nutrition and Associate Dean for Research for the College of Health Sciences at Rush University Medical Center. She is involved with the American Cancer Society, and provides lectures and demonstrations about healthy eating and cooking to cancer survivors. She has been a speaker for the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women program. Tangney was elected to a four-year unfilled term. 
 
Debbie Smart Marianthi Thanapoulos is the community engagement liaison for the Village of Mount Prospect. She is the president of Tharos Productions, a local not-for-profit. She is a past member of Women in Film and has volunteered for Big Brothers Big Sisters. She is a member of the PTA and has presented at the University of Chicago. Thanapoulos was first appointed in August of 2016 and served on the Finance and Human Resources Committees of the Board of Library Trustees.
 
 

Posted by aharder on 03/10/16
 
"Fairy tales were and still are comfort reading to me," said Gregory Maguire, New York Times bestselling author of Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West during a special library-sponsored appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Wednesday evening, March 9. 
 
More than 200 people turned out to hear Maguire deliver a lively 75-minute exploration of creativity and storytelling titled, "No Rest for the Wicked: On Reading and Writing Fantasy....and the Magic of Broadway." 
 
"Life itself is the most wonderful of fairy tales," began Maguire by quoting one of his favorite fairy tale authors, Hans Christian Andersen. From there Maguire candidly shared his story of a tough childhood in Albany, New York, "All the fairy tales I came across as a child seemed to be secret biographies of me." With equal parts wit and wisdom, Maguire took the audience on an intimate journey by projecting family photographs and images of his earliest stories already filled with adventure and fantasy. "I wrote more than 100 stories between fourth and tenth grade. I'd finish one and say that was fun, let's do it again."
 
That same enthusiasm continues today. Maguire has published 38 books including his latest novel, After Alice, a new twist on the Lewis Carroll classic Alice in Wonderland.
 
Since its publication in 1995, Wicked has sold five million copies and became the basis for the smash hit Tony-award winning Broadway musical. Maguire showed the audience the original draft of the award-winning novel, a handwritten manuscript. "Look, it's pen, paper, I'm using notebooks. I'm still writing much like I did in fourth grade."
 
Following his animated presentation, Maguire took questions from the audience and shared insights on his writing process.
 
"All of my stories begin with a moral or intellectual question like what is evil and where does it come from or what is beauty," said Maguire.
 
The evening ended with a book signing and meet and greet with the author in the lobby of the Metropolis.

Posted by paichele on 11/13/15
 
"I think I'm still a short storyteller at heart," author Cristina Henríquez told an audience of 200+ during an appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Thursday evening, November 12. Cristina spoke about her novel, The Book of Unknown Americans, which was chosen as the 2015 One Book, One Village selection by the library. In an interview-style program moderated by Info Services Librarian Mike Monahan, Cristina spoke candidly about her book which she originally wrote as a short story before expanding - a task which took five years to complete and tells the story of two families who have immigrated to the United States from Latin America and their neighbors living in a Delaware apartment complex.
 
"The second you hear someone's story, or imagine their story, it becomes so much harder to be intolerant," she said. "One of the goals of the book was to keep poking at stereotypes."
 
Following the 50-minute conversation on-stage, the author fielded questions from the audience which included sharing insights on the editing and publishing process.

Earlier in the program when asked to describe the meaning of home, Henríquez responded, "Home is not a place. To me, home is a feeling. It's that feeling when your soul sighs."

The Metropolis event capped off a day-long exchange between the author and the Arlington Heights community about The Book Unknown Americans. Earlier at the library, she did a short reading from the novel for an audience in the Cardinal Room and met in the Hub with more than 80 students from three District 214 schools.

 


 
District 214 students meet One Book, One Village author in the Hub
 
What better way to learn about a book than to meet its author. That's what happened for more than 80 high school students who had the opportunity to meet Cristina Henríquez, author of The Book of Unknown Americans, during her November 12 visit to Arlington Heights and the library for One Book, One Village. 
 
The students gathered in the Hub from three schools - John Hersey High School, Rolling Meadows High School and District 214's Newcomer Center - and spent more than an hour with Cristina asking questions about the book, its characters and what it takes to be an author.
 
"It took me five years to write this book and there were days when it really was a struggle and I wondered if I'd ever finish it," she told the students. Henríquez later added, "The best thing you can do for your writing is to forget that anyone is ever going to read it and just write."
 
 
 

Posted by wtolan on 10/13/17
 
"We choose to live the way we do and participate the way we do," said Dave Eggers to an audience of more than 350 people who packed the Forest View Auditorium on Thursday evening October 12 to hear the award-winning writer, editor and philanthropist speak as he touched on topics like privacy, surveillance and free choice -- all central themes in his dystopian novel The Circle, the 2017 One Book, One Village (OBOV) selection.
 
In an interview-style program moderated by the library's Info Services Supervisor Pam Schwarting, Eggers settled in and talked about his artistic path, which began in the first grade in the Lake Forest public schools and continued with "an uninterrupted string of awesome teachers" who helped spark his interest in writing. A focus on painting followed in middle school and high school.
 
"I trained as an artist, every bone in my body thought I'd be a painter," Eggers said.
 
It was as a sophomore studying at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign that Eggers switched his focus from painting to journalism and his life as a writer took hold.
 
“I came of age with a desktop computer and learned to write on a Mac," Eggers said, then joked, "I'm inherently a slob so the desktop allowed me to revise, revise, revise.”
 
This process of writing, and re-writing, continues still today. Eggers, who describes himself as "an endless reviser," shared with the audience his typical work day. He writes in his home office in his converted garage where there is no phone or internet.
 
“It's taken me a long time to get settled and to remember where I am with what I'm writing," Eggers explained. "I have a chair, a wingback chair...I sit in that chair for eight hours to get 45 minutes done.”
 
This process has resulted in an extensive eclectic body of work. Eggers is the author of 10 books including fiction and nonfiction. His debut, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, was a New York Times bestselling memoir and a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2001. Other works include Zeitoun, Heroes of the Frontier, A Hologram for the King, a finalist for the 2012 National Book Award, and the international bestseller, The Circle
 
Eggers told the audience he took notes for about 10 years on situations involving individual's freedoms and privacy versus society's safety and right to know before writing The Circle.
 
"I do believe a human under surveillance is not free," Eggers said. He described the rise of social media and the increased use of measurements as "the new neediness." While reflecting about the choices his characters make in The Circle, Eggers described their situations as "51/49" since they deal with the ever-pressing struggle of finding ways for improving the world without stripping people of their rights.
 
Following the 60-minute onstage presentation, Eggers took questions from the audience, which highlighted some of his philanthropic work including 826 National, a network of tutoring centers around the country including one here in Wicker Park.
 

An Evening with Author Dave Eggers and his appearance in Arlington Heights came on the heels of Eggers receiving the prestigious Carl Sandburg Literary Award in Chicago on October 11. Reflecting on this honor, which is presented to a writer in recognition of the totality of his or her work, Eggers said, "I'm very humbled and happy that I can sit in my garage and write."

 

Posted by paichele on 09/22/15
 
One Book, One Village, the library's community-wide reading initiative, topped the agenda at the Village's Board of Trustees meeting on Monday, September 21. Deputy Director Jeremy Andrykowski took to the podium to spread the word about this year's selection, The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henríquez
 
"This is the second year in a row that the library’s offering One Book, One Village," Andrykowski said, "And the idea is simple – we want to build community by inviting all of Arlington Heights to read the same book at the same time."
 
Andrykowski introduced a prerecorded video of the author which was played for the mayor, trustees and residents in attendance. 
 
He concluded his remarks by highlighting the author visit by Cristina Henríquez on Thursday, November 12 which is being presented in partnership with the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre. The interview-style program begins at 7 p.m. followed by a book signing with the author.  Arlington Heights residents can register for this event beginning October 1.
 
Visit ahml.info/onebook for more information including upcoming programs and book discussions.

Posted by paichele on 09/30/17
 
To learn more about the construction project visit ahml.info/safety.

 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy