Posts tagged with "Adults"

Posted by aharder on 03/10/16
 
"Fairy tales were and still are comfort reading to me," said Gregory Maguire, New York Times bestselling author of Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West during a special library-sponsored appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Wednesday evening, March 9. 
 
More than 200 people turned out to hear Maguire deliver a lively 75-minute exploration of creativity and storytelling titled, "No Rest for the Wicked: On Reading and Writing Fantasy....and the Magic of Broadway." 
 
"Life itself is the most wonderful of fairy tales," began Maguire by quoting one of his favorite fairy tale authors, Hans Christian Andersen. From there Maguire candidly shared his story of a tough childhood in Albany, New York, "All the fairy tales I came across as a child seemed to be secret biographies of me." With equal parts wit and wisdom, Maguire took the audience on an intimate journey by projecting family photographs and images of his earliest stories already filled with adventure and fantasy. "I wrote more than 100 stories between fourth and tenth grade. I'd finish one and say that was fun, let's do it again."
 
That same enthusiasm continues today. Maguire has published 38 books including his latest novel, After Alice, a new twist on the Lewis Carroll classic Alice in Wonderland.
 
Since its publication in 1995, Wicked has sold five million copies and became the basis for the smash hit Tony-award winning Broadway musical. Maguire showed the audience the original draft of the award-winning novel, a handwritten manuscript. "Look, it's pen, paper, I'm using notebooks. I'm still writing much like I did in fourth grade."
 
Following his animated presentation, Maguire took questions from the audience and shared insights on his writing process.
 
"All of my stories begin with a moral or intellectual question like what is evil and where does it come from or what is beauty," said Maguire.
 
The evening ended with a book signing and meet and greet with the author in the lobby of the Metropolis.

Posted by paichele on 11/13/15
 
"I think I'm still a short storyteller at heart," author Cristina Henríquez told an audience of 200+ during an appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Thursday evening, November 12. Cristina spoke about her novel, The Book of Unknown Americans, which was chosen as the 2015 One Book, One Village selection by the library. In an interview-style program moderated by Info Services Librarian Mike Monahan, Cristina spoke candidly about her book which she originally wrote as a short story before expanding - a task which took five years to complete and tells the story of two families who have immigrated to the United States from Latin America and their neighbors living in a Delaware apartment complex.
 
"The second you hear someone's story, or imagine their story, it becomes so much harder to be intolerant," she said. "One of the goals of the book was to keep poking at stereotypes."
 
Following the 50-minute conversation on-stage, the author fielded questions from the audience which included sharing insights on the editing and publishing process.

Earlier in the program when asked to describe the meaning of home, Henríquez responded, "Home is not a place. To me, home is a feeling. It's that feeling when your soul sighs."

The Metropolis event capped off a day-long exchange between the author and the Arlington Heights community about The Book Unknown Americans. Earlier at the library, she did a short reading from the novel for an audience in the Cardinal Room and met in the Hub with more than 80 students from three District 214 schools.

 


 
District 214 students meet One Book, One Village author in the Hub
 
What better way to learn about a book than to meet its author. That's what happened for more than 80 high school students who had the opportunity to meet Cristina Henríquez, author of The Book of Unknown Americans, during her November 12 visit to Arlington Heights and the library for One Book, One Village. 
 
The students gathered in the Hub from three schools - John Hersey High School, Rolling Meadows High School and District 214's Newcomer Center - and spent more than an hour with Cristina asking questions about the book, its characters and what it takes to be an author.
 
"It took me five years to write this book and there were days when it really was a struggle and I wondered if I'd ever finish it," she told the students. Henríquez later added, "The best thing you can do for your writing is to forget that anyone is ever going to read it and just write."
 
 
 

Posted by paichele on 09/22/15
 
One Book, One Village, the library's community-wide reading initiative, topped the agenda at the Village's Board of Trustees meeting on Monday, September 21. Deputy Director Jeremy Andrykowski took to the podium to spread the word about this year's selection, The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henríquez
 
"This is the second year in a row that the library’s offering One Book, One Village," Andrykowski said, "And the idea is simple – we want to build community by inviting all of Arlington Heights to read the same book at the same time."
 
Andrykowski introduced a prerecorded video of the author which was played for the mayor, trustees and residents in attendance. 
 
He concluded his remarks by highlighting the author visit by Cristina Henríquez on Thursday, November 12 which is being presented in partnership with the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre. The interview-style program begins at 7 p.m. followed by a book signing with the author.  Arlington Heights residents can register for this event beginning October 1.
 
Visit ahml.info/onebook for more information including upcoming programs and book discussions.

Posted by aharder on 08/22/16
 
Publishing Your Genealogical Writing
Join us for a panel discussion regarding the publishing process for genealogical writing. Learn what has worked, what they would have done differently, and platforms used to self-publish.
Date and time: Saturday, October 8, 1-3 p.m.
Location: Cardinal Room, Arlington Heights Memorial Library
Register
 
 

Posted by paichele on 01/27/15
 
How do you take an existing product and make it better? Just ask the 29 eighth graders at Thomas Middle School who recently completed a new, 9-week elective focused on three-dimensional printing, research and design. Titled 3D RD, the first-time course challenged the students to create or redesign every day products using 3D technology resources available both at school and at the library including Tinkercad, an online design application, and the Hub’s MakerBot 3D printer.

The course culminated on January 20 when the students presented their final 3D projects before an audience of some 50 parents and teachers. Thomas Middle School Principal Brian Kaye emceed the program which was held in the Hub. Students presented ideas and 3D models that ranged from a clever set of interchangeable scissors handles, designed by Arlington Heights students Zoe Axelrod and Annie Waz, to an always in demand TV remote holder.

“Give me a show of hands, how many of you guys have lost your remotes,” asked Emil Harb and Michael Macynski, the student engineers of a sleekly-designed TV remote holder. “This is the item that shall fulfill your needs!”

In all 12 groups of students presented and displayed their printed 3D prototypes at the library.

“The kids were really well-prepared,” says Teen Services Supervisor Tom Spicer, who worked with the District 25 students. “It was really great to see that they were able to start using the modeling software to design and print workable prototypes and products.”

“It was really gratifying to see the students present their final products,” added Jim Grant, Thomas Middle School industrial technology teacher and creator of the class. “It was fun trying something new, and it was great working with the Hub staff. The teamwork between the school and library provided enhanced learning for the students and resulted in some really innovative and creative 3D products.”

Thomas Middle School will offer 3D RD in the spring with a new class starting in April.

Posted by paichele on 08/18/16
 
To prepare for the start of the school year, nearly 40 new teachers to Arlington Heights School District 25 visited the library on August 18 and learned firsthand about resources available to teachers, how to request classroom materials and about upcoming library programs that will enhance student learning beyond the classroom. 
 
Following a before-hours tour of the library, District 25 Superintendent Dr. Lori Bein welcomed the group to the Hub where they also heard  a special presentation by the library's School Services Coordinator (K-8) Julie Jurgens. The teachers participated in two breakout sessions and also had time to explore on their own to learn about services like 3D printing and educational databases.
 
This is the third year that District 25 partnered with the library as part of their new teacher orientation. District 25 is comprised of seven elementary schools and two middle schools in Arlington Heights. The first day of student attendance is Monday, August 29. 

Posted by paichele on 04/27/15

Close to 100 residents gathered at the library on Wednesday night, April 29, for the second annual State of the Village. Leaders from eight governmental entities, including Arlington Heights Mayor Tom Hayes, pictured, participated in the community conversation. Each took to the stage and presented current projects and significant developments that impact the village, area schools and park district.
 
The library presented a video featuring highlights of the past year. Audience members were also the first to learn the library's 2015 One Book, One Village book selection - The Book of Unknown Americans, by Chicago author Christina Henríquez. Executive Director Jason Kuhl announced this year's choice and invited everyone to join in the library's second community read. Following the presentations, attendees were invited to meet and ask questions of community representatives.
 
Read about State of the Village in the Daily Herald.  The event will also be broadcast on Channel 6 on WideOpenWest, Channel 17 on Comcast and Channel 99 on U-Verse or watch here now.

Posted by paichele on 07/01/15
 
Thanks to everyone who turned out for Arlington Heights' annual Fourth of July parade and cheered on the library's two entries - the bookmobile and a float featuring our One Book, One Village 2015 selection, The Book of Unknown Americans. We also celebrated a special retirement along the way as bookmobile driver Al Piskorski topped off 10+ years of service behind the wheel for the library. Al drove in the parade as his final bookmobile assignment - now that's a finale!  See more parade highlights.

Posted by paichele on 05/12/16
 
Wednesday, May 11 was "pitch night" for more than 40 John Hersey High School student entrepreneurs who took center stage at the library to compete in a Shark Tank-style showdown. In all, eight groups of students presented, each giving their best pitches for new businesses and start-up opportunities before a panel of five judges, including Mayor Tom Hayes, and an audience of more than 100 people.
 
Start-up ideas ranged from Campus View, a virtual college campus tour website, to Mass Meals, a subscription-based meal delivery service. Other ideas included an online gift buying service named Trendit  and a resale service for homecoming and prom dresses called Dress Again.
 
In the end, the winning idea was GoFur, a business described as "the bridge that connects young and eager adults to local residents needing help with their errands."  GoFur was created by student entrepreneurs Mitch Carlisle, Javin Maestro, David Fernquist, Spencer Krueger, Jake Kramarczyk and Carsen Anderson.
 
The presentations capped off nine months of hard work in an innovative class titled Entrepreneurship. Taught by Dan Vesper, a business education teacher at Hersey, the class combined a dynamic new curriculum from INCubatoredu with hands-on learning, guest presenters and mentoring by more than 35 area businesses and professionals.
 
"The kids were very prepared, composed, professional and so creative," says Shannon Distel, the library's Business and Specialty Services Manager who presented to the students earlier in the school year. "The whole idea was for the students to identify a problem and come up with a solution. It was impressive to see the results, and I could tell they had used some library resources."
 
GoFur moves on to compete in the District 214 Pitch Night to be held at Forest View Educational Center on Tuesday, May 17, 6:30 p.m.  Student entrepreneurs from across the district will compete for top honors and a cash prize.
 

Posted by aharder on 05/27/15
 
Fifth-grade students from Windsor Elementary School got a first-hand glimpse of what it’s like to have a job in a library during their visit on Wednesday, May 27. The students gained some real-life work experience in the library's Circulation department and Kids' World as part of the World of Work (WOW) program. These five students learned about selecting materials for the collection, checking in books and movies, re-shelving items, preparing kids' craft supplies, and more. WOW is an annual event which gives students an opportunity to dress professionally and act as “employees" for a day. The program is supported by 27 Arlington Heights businesses, with the goal of having students learn about the local economy.

 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy