Posts tagged with "Historical Fiction"

Posted by mingh on 03/22/12
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A number of fiction books have been written about the life of Amelia Earhart. I Was Amelia Earhart has her surviving the crash of her plane with her flight navigator, Fred Noonan.
 
In this brilliantly imagined novel, Amelia Earhart tells us what happened after she and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared off the coast of New Guinea one glorious, windy day in 1937. And she tells us about herself.  There is her love affair with flying ("The sky is flesh") . . . .

There are her memories of the past: her childhood desire to become a heroine ("Heroines did what they wanted") . . . her marriage to G.P. Putnam, who promoted her to fame, but was willing to gamble her life so that the book she was writing about her round-the-world flight would sell out before Christmas.

There is the flight itself -- day after magnificent or perilous or exhilarating or terrifying day ("Noonan once said any fool could have seen I was risking my life but not living it").

And there is, miraculously, an island ("We named it Heaven, as a kind of joke"). And, most important, there is Noonan . . .

 
Here are other fiction books about the life of Amelia Earhart.

Posted by Ultra Violet on 06/17/13
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Attention fans of BBC America's Supernatural Saturday! Coming in 2014 is a new series based on the historical fantasy novel, Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell.
 
If you haven't read it, now's your chance. It's 782 pages, so you may want to start now. Two magicians are bringing magic back to England with their skills and knowledge of long forgotten lore. As the Napoleonic Wars rage on, Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell find themselves pitted against a deliciously crafty fairy.
 
Fans of dark fairy tales and historical fantasy will enjoy this beautifully crafted story.

Posted by Ultra Violet on 11/10/11
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I just can't get enough Tesla (the scientist, not the band). I am also a big fan of Jean Echenoz. He writes with style, grace and honesty. This is an elegant novel, although it is a bit depressing.

Posted by dnapravn on 11/13/13
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If you are anything like me you are having a difficult time waiting for the new season of Downton Abbey to begin. I can't wait to discover what's in store for the Crawley's and their servants this season. To make the time pass a little more quickly, you may want to get your fix of domestics by reading Jo Baker's latest novel, Longbourn. In it she imagines the belowstairs life of the Bennet household, the beloved family of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice.
 
While Pride and Prejudice follows the comings and goings of the Bennet family, Longbourn focuses on their small, often overworked domestic staff. Mrs. Hill, the housekeeper, does her best to keep everything running smoothly with the help of her aging husband, two young housemaids, Sarah and Polly, and the new footman, James. The novel focuses primarily on Sarah, who is bound and determined to decipher the mysterious appearance of the new footman in addition to completing all of her household duties.  
 
This was a fun, quick read that, in my opinion, stayed respectful to Austen's beloved classic. Enjoy! The Crawley family and their servants will be back in no time.

Posted by Auntie Anne. on 12/01/11
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It was the summer of 1880 in Paris, 10 years after France's crippling defeat in the Prussian war.  Even though France was finally recovering from a serious economic depression, the devastating psychological effect of the war could still be felt.  Parisian energy rebounded, however, when workers were given Sundays off.  A new society emerged - la vie moderne - and cafes, caberets, dance halls, and theaters all flourished.  The building of railroad lines to the countryside allowed Parisians to enjoy their Sundays in the enchanting riverside villages west of Paris.

A small group of artists, called Impressionists, had discovered the new engergy and modern individualism as well.  Breaking away from the classic artistic traditions of form and line, with scenes from the Bible or history as inspiration, the Impressionists left their studios to paint "La vie moderne" as they saw it and lived it.  Boldly using feathery touches of unblended color in textural brushstrokes, they painted scenes from the caberets, dance halls, theaters and Sunday boaters and picnicers.  Pierre-Auguste Renoir was one such painter. The Impressionists met with much criticism, since their technique was such a radical break with the classic artists.  One such critic threw down the gauntlet by saying "the Impressionists are inferior to what they undertake.  The man of genius has not arisen."  August Renoir picked up the gauntlet and created a work of true genius - "Luncheon of the Boating Party."

Susan Vreeland, the author, has given the reader a wonderful fictional accounting of the creation of this masterpiece by Renoir.  Renoir met with almost insurmountable obstacles.  He had only eight weeks of Sundays to paint it on the terrace of La Maison Fournaise at Chatou before he would lose the good summer light.  He was totally broke but somehow had to pay for the huge canvas, paints, fees for 14 models and rent for the terrace each Sunday.  When he began working on the painting his right arm was broken, so he painted with his left.  Crippling rheumatoid arthritis was beginning to take its toll on his fingers. Woven throughout the book are the personal stories of the 14 people who are in the painting.  Their colorful stories paint their own picture of la vie moderne in Paris - an actress, a mime, a journalist, an adventurer, a singer-flower seller, an art collector, a poet, a boatman, a baron, a yachtsman-painter.  Vreeland gives us a good taste of the conflicts and hedonism of the era, as well as the anguish and the joy, without which the Impressionists would have had no inspiration.


Posted by lsears on 11/11/14
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It is May 1911 in Paris, France. Eva Gouel is a young woman who sets off for Paris leaving her parents and their restrictive, old-fashioned ideas behind. Renaming herself Marcelle Humbert, she finds a job as a seamstress for the performers at the Moulin Rouge.  She meets Pablo Picasso and falls under his spell and he under hers, changing her world dramatically.
 
The book is a love story and depicts a time that was prudish yet pushed limits with new avant-garde art, dance and literature. Relationships with luminaries of the day, Georges Braque, Gertrude Stein, and Guillaume Apollinaire fuel Picasso’s creative expression. His volatile temperament is calmed by Eva and Picasso shows a side of himself that is generous and kind.
 
In writing this work of historical fiction, author Anne Girard cannot know the entire dialog that went on between people, so liberties are taken in the telling, but the facts remain. The people, events and places described are all real, even the accusation of Picasso participating in the theft of the Mona Lisa.  This short-lived period of time when Eva and Picasso are together reveal a talent driven by tragic experiences and ambition and a woman devoted and strengthened by her love for Picasso.
 

Posted by Ultra Violet on 05/15/15
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Historical fiction that reads like a romance novel (a good one) with a bit of suspense thrown in. Everyone has an image of Edgar Allan Poe from his work and from the stories of his poverty, alcoholism and instability. But not everyone knows that much of his negative image was constructed by a literary rival, Rufus Griswold, in a posthumous biography.

In Cullen's well-researched novel she shows us a softer side of Poe. Cullen built a story around the rumour of Poe's affair with poet, Frances Osgood. Their forbidden love-match makes their lives a roller coaster ride of exultation and torture. They risk ostracism from the oppressive nineteenth century New York society to be together. I had a hard time picturing him being called "Eddie" by his wife and mother-in-law, but as the book progresses, the character becomes quite believable. Throughout the tense, forbidden romance there are plenty of factual tidbits from the lives of Poe, Frances Osgood and others of New York intellectual society.

This is a great read for fans of historical fiction, poetry, and literary romances.


Posted by dnapravn on 07/10/14
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Molly Ayer has lived with a number of foster families in her seventeen years. When she gets in trouble at school, her current placement is in jeopardy unless she makes the most of her community service assignment. As she begrudgingly helps the elderly Vivian sort through her belongings in a packed and dusty attic, Molly learns that Vivian has not always lived a comfortable life. Vivian was once a passenger on one of the many orphan trains that traveled west in order to provide children with a "better" life.
 
As Orphan Train unfolds, we find the two main characters growing closer to each other and realizing that despite their age difference they have quite a bit in common. As Molly grows more attached to Vivian and learns more of Vivian's past, she realizes that there may be something she can do to help her.
 
Told in alternating voices, Orphan Train was a quick read and a reminder of a lesser known part of American history. If you'd like to learn more about the orphan trains, make sure to check out these materials on the subject.

Posted by cclapper on 04/10/11
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Scotland -- 1074: Shipwrecked! Her family cast ashore- including Edgar of England, outlawed.  Warrior-King Malcolm Canmore will help... for the price of her hand in marriage.  Her hand that will steer the development of a barbaric Scotland and its peoples.  Rough-hewn times.  Rough justice.  Strong wills.
 
See Susan Fraser King's other novels, too: Lady Miracle and Lady MacBeth.  Yup.  THAT Lady MacBeth.      

Posted by Kelley M on 04/06/15
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Every time Michelle Moran releases a new book, I can’t wait to get my hands on it! Her latest book, Rebel Queen, did not disappoint. She has previously written historical fiction books about Cleopatra, Nefertiti, Cleopatra’s Daughter, Napoleon’s wife, and Madame Tussaud. Her newest book takes us to a whole different land and era. Rebel Queen tells the story of one of the most famous women of all time in India, Queen Lakshmi (India’s Joan of Arc) and the brave women soldiers (the Durgavasi) who protected her. The story is told from the point of view of Sita, one of Queen Lakshmi’s Durgavasi soldiers. Also interesting was learning more about the lives of women in purdah (the practice among women in certain Muslim and Hindu societies of living in seclusion by means of concealing clothing and the use of high-walled enclosures, screens, and curtains within the home).
 
I have always been of the philosophy that, if a novel of historical fiction is written the right way, it should entice me to further research the era highlighted in the book. Rebel Queen fits this theory. I found the first part of the book to be slow, but steady. The action and plot really picked up towards the last third of the book. It was definitely a read worth finishing. I can’t wait to see what female heroine the author chooses to write about next.
 

 
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