Posts tagged with "KW Parents"

Posted by Ms. L on 07/23/14
Who knew that given a flat balance beam, buckets, and cars, that children would build a road and a hill?  Just another example of how open play can inspire creativity, problem-solving skills, collaboration, and sharing as well as give children an opportuntiy to explore scientific concepts such as ramps and velocity. 
 
Join us for Playgroups following storytime on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:45-11:45.  Storytimes and Playgroups take place every week, with a scheduled break from August 11 - September 1.  Storytimes and Playgroups will resume their regular schedule beginning September 2. 

Posted by Mizz J on 08/02/11
My 2nd grader reads at a 5th or 6th grade level. Are there appropriate books?"  The answer is "Yes!" I often suggest those created when children's books did not routinely involve themselves in adult-sized problems. Written with rich language, these classics are still around today. Consider family stories like
Try fantasies like
Suggest lighthearted reads like The Enormous Egg, Mr. Popper's Penguins, and The Great Brain.

Posted by Mrs. T. on 01/15/13
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Are you having a hard time getting your child to read after the holidays? All they want to do is play with their LEGOs? The library has fascinating books about these creative, wonderful toys. Check these out - Amazing LEGO Books - They may just get your child reading!

Posted by Kidbrarian on 02/03/12
One of the simple joys of childhood is creating your own pictures.With the IPad app DoodleCast, a child can make a picture, narrate the story and upload it all on YouTube using just one finger.This app was recognized by the 2012 Kids At Play Interactive (KAPi) jurors as the best app for younger children.

Posted by Mrs. T. on 02/06/14
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If you are thinking of homeschooling or already do, please drop by the library on Tuesday, February 11 for coffee and chat. We will have STEM kits for you to browse and materials borrowed from the Johnsburg Public Library's Homeschool Resource Center. Children are welcome too. I hope to see you here!

Posted by Mrs. T. on 04/19/12
In our busy lives sometimes it's easy to forget about the fun, enriching things. Enewsletters are a great way to remind yourself about upcoming library programs for children or even new chapter books that have just been purchased by the library. If you have a young child you may be interested in literacy tips and new picture books. The library has over 30 eNewsletters for all ages and interests that appear in your e-mail as a gentle reminder to sign your child up for that program or  grab a good book for your child - or yourself. Just sign up for any that interest you. To see a list of all that is offered click here and enjoy!

Posted by Kidbrarian on 04/04/12
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As a kid, I often heard these words from my mom. Now that spring has arrived, we have the perfect books filled with ideas for your children when these words cross your lips. Whether its an old standard or a new-to-you activity, these books explain the games in a simple and straightforward ,manner. So, get the iced tea and lemonade ready. It's time for an outdoor get-together.

Posted by Ms. L on 03/14/12
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I was in line a few weeks ago and observed a mother keeping her young daughter entertained as they waited by singing Jim Gill songs. The little girl danced along, doing all the actions the lyrics called for. It reminded me to check out his latest CD, Jim Gill Presents Music Play for Folks of All Stripes. My favorite songs on the CD are “It Takes Some Friends” and “Bananas.” Chicago Parent gave the CD a rave review but WXRT perhaps put it best when they said simply, “No one does it better than Jim Gill.”

Posted by Ms. L on 10/09/12
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Fall is a great time to take a walk with your child and talk about all of the wonderful colors, sights, sounds, and smells of the season.  In addition to simply enjoying time spent together, these types of observation walks are also a good opportunity to engage your child’s senses, build vocabulary, and talk about everyday science, such as why do leaves change colors?  (For the answer, click here.)
 
Here are some fun fall fingerplays to share as you explore:
 
Autumn Leaves
(To the tune of “Mary Had a Little Lamb”)
Autumn leaves are falling down, falling down, falling down.
Autumn leaves are falling down, all over town.
The cold wind blows them all around…
They’re drifting gently to the ground…
Take a rake and rake them up…
 
Fall Leaves Whisper
All the leaves are falling down (Flutter fingers downward)
Orange, green, red, and brown. (Futter fingers)
If you listen, you'll hear them say, (Cup hands around ears)
"Wintertime is on its way." (Whispering)
 
I'm a Little Pumpkin
(To the Tune of “ I'm a Little Teapot”)
I'm a little pumpkin, fat and round.
Here is my face making a frown.
I'm a little pumpkin, tall and thin.
Here is my face, making a grin.
I'm a little pumpkin, I've got style.
Here is my face making a smile!
 
Two Little Apples
(To the tune of Barney’s “I Love You, You Love Me”)
Way up high, in a tree
Two little apples smiled at me.
So I shook that tree as hard as I could
Down came the apples, mm-mm good.
(Repeat with one apple)
 
 

Posted by Ms. L on 02/12/13
Getting ready to read involves many skills.  One of the skills is naming letters.  There are lots of fun ways to help children learn letter names and their shapes.  Many of these activities can be done throughout your day;
 
Point out shapes of toys and other objects and talk about how they are alike and different.  Comparing and contrasting shapes helps children notice the differences between letter shapes.
 
Help your child notice environmental print such as names on food cartons, or words on road signs. 
 
Talk about letters that are most interesting to your child, like the beginning letter of his or her first name.  Help your child find that letter throughout the day. 
 
Use alphabet books.  Point to pictures and talk about letter names with your child. 
 
Write letters in shaving cream on the shower wall, or help your child point to letters on a keyboard. 
 
Most importantly, learning about letters should be fun!  Children learn best through play.