Posts tagged with "Teen"

Posted by aharder on 07/05/16
 
Up, Up and Away! It's a superhero summer at the library, and our Fourth of July parade entry celebrated this theme with everyone in Arlington Heights on Monday. Special thanks to all of the volunteers, staff and library trustees who represented AHML in the Fourth of July Parade alongside the library's bookmobile and our special superhero guests. Thanks also to the Frontier Days Festival organizers for another outstanding parade day in Arlington Heights. See more photos here.

Posted by aharder on 05/11/16

In the past year the library has presented storytimes, STEM clubs, book discussions, author visits, exhibits, summer reading programs and more. We've welcomed the community to celebrate the arts at the District 25 art show and reception, a fairy tale exhibit and costume gala and months of themed programs exploring fairy tales. Arlington Heights came together to read and discuss the themes behind the One Book, One Village book selection and tweens and teens found opportunities to learn and discover together. Local entrepreneurs gathered to share their experiences with small business owners and the library continued to offer new tools for customers to get creative in the Studio.

The library is a busy place thanks to our customers, with nearly 90,000 people attending programs at the library in 2015. Check out our video featuring highlights of the past year, then see a list of upcoming programs at ahml.info.


Posted by daccurso on 02/10/09
tom_spicerThe facts about Tom He grew up and went to high school in nearby Barrington, Illinois, where he was in a really awful rock and roll band. He can not sing. He went to library school at Indiana University and is one of seven kids. His favorite meal is Lod Nar, which is a Thai dish that features wide noodles, ginger, broccoli, gravy and hot sauce. He is very excited to be working with the Teen Advisory Group. They are busy thinking up programs, laughing, eating pizza and, of course, talking about books! He is passionate about reading “One of the most important ways to get someone to want to read for their own personal enjoyment is to allow them the freedom to choose what they read. This may sound simple, but letting them make the choice engages their interests, curiosities and needs. The freedom to explore books will allow them to see that there are books out there seemingly written just for them. When readers are connected to the right book, there is a good chance that this experience will lead them down the path of lifelong reading.” Some really great books for high school students Learn more about these books on the teen page The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay Rule of the Bone by Russell Banks Blankets by Craig Thompson The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie Maus by Art Spiegelman Graceling by Kristin Cashore If you are ever looking for suggestions for a good book to read or have any questions at all, you can email Tom at teenlibrarian@ahml.info. To visit the What's Up at the Library blog homepage, click here.
Posted by paichele on 02/10/17

Following a six-month pilot period, the Arlington Heights Memorial Library Board of Trustees voted to extend the library’s weekend hours, remaining open until 8 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, and opening the library an hour earlier, at 11 a.m., on Sundays. The cost for the library’s extended hours will be managed within the library’s currently approved budget.
 
The library’s new hours are:
Monday–Friday  9 a.m.–10 p.m.
Saturday  9 a.m.–8 p.m.
Sunday  11 a.m.–8 p.m.
 
The pilot program was based upon a recent survey of library customers which indicated many residents wished the library offered more hours on the weekends. An extensive study of customer use during the pilot program confirmed these survey results. For example, use of the Studio saw a 67 percent increase in weekend reservations. On average, 165 customers visited the library per hour during the pilot program, using the library during hours the library previously would have not been open.
 
"These expanded hours stem from the fact that people's lives are busier than ever, and we want to make it as convenient as possible for them to visit the library," said Executive Director Jason Kuhl. “We saw strong use of the library in all areas and are happy to continue this customer service going forward.”
 

Posted by aharder on 08/20/15
 
As part of their back to school preparations, approximately 40 new teachers to Arlington Heights School District 25 visited the Arlington Heights Memorial Library on August 20 to learn about library resources available to teachers, how to request classroom materials, upcoming author visits and fall programs students will be interested in. Teachers toured the library and heard a presentation by School Services Coordinator (K-8) Julie Jurgens.

The library serves all preschools, elementary, middle and high schools located in Arlington Heights or where Arlington Heights students make up at least 45 percent of the student body. For more information, visit http://www.ahml.info/teachers.

Posted by paichele on 11/13/15
 
"I think I'm still a short storyteller at heart," author Cristina Henríquez told an audience of 200+ during an appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Thursday evening, November 12. Cristina spoke about her novel, The Book of Unknown Americans, which was chosen as the 2015 One Book, One Village selection by the library. In an interview-style program moderated by Info Services Librarian Mike Monahan, Cristina spoke candidly about her book which she originally wrote as a short story before expanding - a task which took five years to complete and tells the story of two families who have immigrated to the United States from Latin America and their neighbors living in a Delaware apartment complex.
 
"The second you hear someone's story, or imagine their story, it becomes so much harder to be intolerant," she said. "One of the goals of the book was to keep poking at stereotypes."
 
Following the 50-minute conversation on-stage, the author fielded questions from the audience which included sharing insights on the editing and publishing process.

Earlier in the program when asked to describe the meaning of home, Henríquez responded, "Home is not a place. To me, home is a feeling. It's that feeling when your soul sighs."

The Metropolis event capped off a day-long exchange between the author and the Arlington Heights community about The Book Unknown Americans. Earlier at the library, she did a short reading from the novel for an audience in the Cardinal Room and met in the Hub with more than 80 students from three District 214 schools.

 


 
District 214 students meet One Book, One Village author in the Hub
 
What better way to learn about a book than to meet its author. That's what happened for more than 80 high school students who had the opportunity to meet Cristina Henríquez, author of The Book of Unknown Americans, during her November 12 visit to Arlington Heights and the library for One Book, One Village. 
 
The students gathered in the Hub from three schools - John Hersey High School, Rolling Meadows High School and District 214's Newcomer Center - and spent more than an hour with Cristina asking questions about the book, its characters and what it takes to be an author.
 
"It took me five years to write this book and there were days when it really was a struggle and I wondered if I'd ever finish it," she told the students. Henríquez later added, "The best thing you can do for your writing is to forget that anyone is ever going to read it and just write."
 
 
 

Posted by paichele on 01/27/15
 
How do you take an existing product and make it better? Just ask the 29 eighth graders at Thomas Middle School who recently completed a new, 9-week elective focused on three-dimensional printing, research and design. Titled 3D RD, the first-time course challenged the students to create or redesign every day products using 3D technology resources available both at school and at the library including Tinkercad, an online design application, and the Hub’s MakerBot 3D printer.

The course culminated on January 20 when the students presented their final 3D projects before an audience of some 50 parents and teachers. Thomas Middle School Principal Brian Kaye emceed the program which was held in the Hub. Students presented ideas and 3D models that ranged from a clever set of interchangeable scissors handles, designed by Arlington Heights students Zoe Axelrod and Annie Waz, to an always in demand TV remote holder.

“Give me a show of hands, how many of you guys have lost your remotes,” asked Emil Harb and Michael Macynski, the student engineers of a sleekly-designed TV remote holder. “This is the item that shall fulfill your needs!”

In all 12 groups of students presented and displayed their printed 3D prototypes at the library.

“The kids were really well-prepared,” says Teen Services Supervisor Tom Spicer, who worked with the District 25 students. “It was really great to see that they were able to start using the modeling software to design and print workable prototypes and products.”

“It was really gratifying to see the students present their final products,” added Jim Grant, Thomas Middle School industrial technology teacher and creator of the class. “It was fun trying something new, and it was great working with the Hub staff. The teamwork between the school and library provided enhanced learning for the students and resulted in some really innovative and creative 3D products.”

Thomas Middle School will offer 3D RD in the spring with a new class starting in April.

Posted by aharder on 02/13/17

The library was bustling with activity this weekend with a record-breaking number of visitors coming to see the amazing one-of-a-kind creations of the Northern Illinois LEGO Train Club on exhibit in the Hendrickson Room. More than 6,200 guests visited the exhibit Saturday and Sunday. Eleven train club members spent six hours assembling the main display. In addition to the Hendrickson exhibit, the library offered LEGO Club in the Marketplace, with large crowds on both days making models then displaying them at the library. Thanks to everyone who stopped by for all the LEGO fun! More photos in our Facebook gallery here. 

Posted by aharder on 12/19/16
 
AHML is ready for the snow! We now have snow brushes available for check out. They are on the rack with the umbrellas near the Express Reserve shelves. Like the umbrellas, the loan period is one week.  

Posted by aharder on 02/29/16
 
The library continued its celebration of all things fairy tale by welcoming tween fairy tale author Liesl Shurtliff to the library on February 25. Shurtliff, the author of Rump: The True Story of Rumpelstiltskin and Jack: The True Story of Jack and the Beanstalk, talked with a group of more than 150 fairy tale fans about myths and legends, where they come from, how they change and what they mean to us today. More than 40 tweens joined Shurtliff for a writing workshop earlier in the day for fourth- to sixth-grade students.
 
Please join us for an upcoming fairy-tale themed program or visit Kids’ World's Once Upon a Time…Exploring the World of Fairy Tales interactive play exhibit for children ages 3 to 10 that runs through March 26. The exhibit is made possible by a gift from the Friends of the Library. To learn more about the Once Upon a Time exhibit and fairy tale programs for all ages, including family movie screenings nights, puppet shows and plays, book discussions, crafts and more, visit ahml.info/fairytales.

 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy