Read Review

A fun look around
»
»

Bryson, having moved into an old English parsonage, goes goes through the house room by room and begins to wonder about just how domestic lives evolved into what they have become.  In typical Bryson fashion, there's a lot of dry humor, saucy details and fascinating diversions. For example, a discussion about the dangers of the stairwell shifts into thoughts about many of the other things around the house that can kill us (and how dangerous paint and wallpaper once were). Thinking about the lawn leads to a brief history of gardens and public parks. If you're like me, and often go through a book in bits and pieces, rather than in a single multi-hour session, then At Home works well--its structure and parade of facts almost welcome occasional breaks.