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Northwest Angle by William Kent Krueger
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09/06/11 Not certain if Krueger has any native American Indian blood running through his family tree, but his Cork O'Connor novels surely show their reverence to that culture. Reading this series is a spiritual experience. It is as if Kitchimanidoo is turning the pages.  



Kitchimanidoo, as called by the Ojibwe tribe, is the god of heaven and earth . His hand reaches out and touches Cork O'Connor and his daughter, Jenny, while they are on a boating adventure near the Canadian border of Minnesota. Caught in a small craft by a huge storm, the two must take shelter on a deserted island.  



The island has an old trapper's cabin where they find a tortured, dead girl. She took to her death the secret of where she hid her deformed baby. Jenny finds the infant boy hidden in the brush in a wicker basket and her maternal instincts take hold. From the moment the baby and Jenny look into each other's eyes, a bond is created that will withstand many a test.  



In this 12th book in the mystery series by Krueger, bonding is one of the main themes. Whether it be between husband and wife, mentor and student, brother and sister, father and daughter, it is the life force that connects loved ones that conquers all. The O'Connors are running for their lives and that of the newly born babe. Some demon is hell-bent on erasing all evidence of its brutal crimes. The O'Connor clan is just a minor speed bump.  



Set in the remote North, this mystery is as engaging as the elements its characters must overcome. Krueger supposedly was said to have wanted to end this series with his previous book, Vermilion Drift, but was talked out of it by his publisher. It is the more fitting ninoododadiwin or "path of harmony" that was chosen.