User Reviews

Reviews by Ultra Violet
Nearly Sense-less
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Imagine losing one of your senses. Now imagine losing all except one. Now imagine that you lost all but the sense of touch when you were only two years old.

That was the unimaginable circumstance of the life of Laura Bridgman. What is Visible by Kimberly Elkins is a heart-rending, thought-provoking novel based on Laura Bridgman’s life and the lives of the many fascinating people who surrounded her. Laura Bridgman was taught to communicate at the age of seven by the use of alphabetical sign language pressed into the palm of the other person. Her teacher was Samuel Gridley Howe, husband of the poet and activist, Julia Ward Howe. Charles Dickens was a personal friend of the Howe’s along with Longfellow and Senator Charles Sumner.

Laura Bridgman was world-famous in her lifetime and was the teacher of Annie Sullivan. And although her fame for having no sense of sight, sound, taste or smell was soon eclipsed by Helen Keller learning to speak, Bridgman was no less an amazing woman for her lack of speech.

Elkins uses this phenomenal historical figure to craft a novel that is much more about isolation, love, and communication than it is about the individual in question. Her writing is lyrical but also a bit stark at times.

As Laura muses over her relationships she says, “Love, I think, is by necessity constructed of a ladder of lies you climb together.”

To learn more about the true Laura Bridgman visit the Perkins Institute’s website.


And to read about Laura Bridgman and Dickens’ other impressions of the United States check out American Notes: And, Picture from Italy by Charles Dickens.



 


If you enjoy entertaining nonfiction about the history of brain science, this is the book for you!

 

Each chapter starts with a rebus that describes the part of the brain which that chapter addresses. No prior knowledge of neurology is needed to understand Kean's work, but he doesn't dumb it down either. The stories from throughout history are fascinating and fun. Some of the descriptions get a bit icky (there were several references to the "custardy" consistancy of a fresh brain) but he doesn't dwell on it or go into gorey detail. And cringing through those moments were worth it to learn about the various characters of medical history who contributed, often through great sacrifice, to our knowledge of the human brain.

 

When was the last time you read a book full of giants, cannibals, and jousting kings... and it was all true?


 
Illusion or Reality
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Martin Strauss has a severe memory disorder. His doctor explains that he will get increasingly worse. Strangely, Martin will not just lose his true memories, but he will also "remember" things that never happened. Adding to his psychological discomfort, Martin is disturbed by his guilt. He was the man who punched Harry Houdini, causing his death.

 

While this is a mysterious historical fiction about the life and death of Houdini, it is also about the fictional character Martin Strauss who struggles with anxiety, uncertainty, guilt, and regret. So, pretty much, the human condition. Martin Strauss and Harry Houdini cross paths repeatedly in a twisting story of reality and illusion. It is an exciting and suspenseful novel, but also a pleasure for a fan of Houdini. Among the many wild speculations and fictionalizations, there is some solid fact about the life of the brilliant illusionist. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and his spiritual medium wife make a cameo. And by the end, the reader has been lead on a crazy, fun journey with a surprising and meaningful ending.


 

If you hate math as much as I do, but have an interest in astronomy and physics, this is the book for you. Tagmark clearly explains his theories of a multiverse and how our physical reality is mathematical in nature, without being boring or overly academic. The math is presented in a manner that enables you to see it in a whole new way. This book is a synthesis of popular science, hard science and autobiography.

Tagmark's obvious exuberance about his subject shines through and stokes the reader's excitement about these facts and theories as well. Not only is Our Mathematical Universe a fun book to peruse if you are a novice science geek, like me, but someone with a serious interest and understanding of astrophysics could read it cover to cover and have quite a bit of food for thought.


 

Luscious, rich desserts that are easy to make, all natural and free of animal products!
I made three recipes from this book, Curry Truffles, Black Bottom Cupcakes and the Opera Cake, and they were all fabulous. The pictures are so enticing and the instructions are very easy to follow. Fran Costigan is pretty much the leading vegan baker in the universe, so all of the recipes are well-tested. She opens with an informative section about vegan sweeteners, dairy substitutes and different kinds of flours, which is helpful to anyone new to baking or new to veganism. I would highly recommend this book to anyone, but especially to people who are thinking about cutting back on the animal products in their diets. Even the most die-hard dairy lover will fall in love this these treats.