Posts tagged with "World Languages"

Posted by paichele on 11/07/16
 
"I was always looking at the world as a laboratory of ideas," author Eric Weiner told an audience of 180 people who gathered at the library on November 3 to hear the award-winning journalist and NPR contributor speak about his latest book, The Geography of Genius: A Search for the Worlds' Most Creative Places, from Ancient Athens to Silicon Valley, the 2016 One Book, One Village (OBOV) selection.
 
In an interview-style program moderated by guest interviewer Mary Luckritz, Head of the English and Fine Arts Division at Rolling Meadows High School, Weiner spoke candidly about his writing career which has evolved from veteran war correspondent covering Middle East conflicts to that of nonfiction travel writer.
 
"I'd come back from reporting on places like Afghanistan and people would ask me 'but what was it really like over there,'" said Weiner. "I realized that what people wanted to know or really wanted to hear were the stories of locals talking in bars or cafes and what their lives were like."
 
These encounters gave rise to Weiner's current assignment of "travel with a purpose," and three award-winning books which intimately explore places around the globe and cleverly connect them with ideas like bliss, divinity and the theme of this year's OBOV selection - genius and creativity.
 
"One trait all geniuses or places of genius share is an openness to experience," said Weiner citing cities like Athens, Vienna and Florence then adding, "Geniuses are the people who look at something that everyone else sees and they see something different."
 
Following the 50-minute conversation on-stage, the author fielded questions from the audience with Weiner jokingly describing the perfect suitcase "bulletproof and easy to grab my phone and notebook" to offering advice on nurturing creativity.
 
"Take breaks from your work, go for a walk...encourage messiness, have conversations, lots of conversations," Weiner reflected, "You have to be willing to take a detour and realize the destination may not be where you expected."

An Evening with Author Eric Weiner event capped off a day-long exchange between the Washington, D.C.-based author and the Arlington Heights community about The Geography of Genius. Earlier in the day, he spoke to 130 students at Rolling Meadows High School. Read more in the Daily Herald.
 

Posted by aharder on 06/14/17
 
Heading abroad over the summer? Make sure to learn the language. The library offers a number of free online language-learning tools:

• Little Pim: Fun, easy lessons for kids, pre-K to 2nd grade. It covers Spanish, French, Chinese, Italian, Japanese, Hebrew, English, German, Arabic, Russian.
• Mango Languages: Lively introductory lessons for 72 languages. Special “Conversations” lessons give you a quick-start. Some language lessons also have full-length foreign-language feature films (for adult audiences) to help improve your language comprehension.
• Pronunciator: Covers over 80 languages. Many have “8-Week Travel Prep” lessons and scheduled “Live Conversation” sessions that let you talk in real-time with a Pronunciator representative. Kids can use their special “Young Learners” lessons. Pronunciator is a more in-depth resource and includes a special evaluation tool to help improve your pronunciation skills.
 
Both Mango and Pronunciator are also valuable tools for learning English as a Second Language (ESL).
 

Posted by aharder on 11/20/18
 
The Arlington Heights Memorial Library announced the appointment of Mike Driskell as the new Executive Director following a unanimous vote by the Board of Library Trustees at its regularly scheduled meeting on Tuesday, November 20.

Driskell “is the best leader for our library,” said Board of Library Trustees President Debbie Smart, “His honesty, integrity and demonstrated work ethic are impressive. The board has the utmost confidence in Mike Driskell as a person who has the vision, values, professionalism and dedication to continue moving the library forward in addressing the needs of our community.”

The board engaged executive search firm John Keister and Associates in Vernon Hills to conduct a national search to fill the position in June 2018. Keister worked with the board to present a group of four finalists earlier this month.

A 13-year veteran of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library, Driskell has served as the interim executive director since September 2017. He was named the library’s director of administration in November 2016, following 11 years of service as the information technology manager. Driskell has an undergraduate degree in computer information systems from Elmhurst College and is enrolled in the Master of Library and Information Science program at Dominican University.

An Arlington Heights resident since 2005, Driskell is an active member of the Arlington Heights community and served as the 2017 chairman of the board of directors at the Arlington Heights Chamber of Commerce.
 

Posted by aharder on 04/05/18
 
Library parking lot full? Did you know parking is also available across the street from the library in the commuter lot on Vail Avenue? After noon on weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday, the Vail commuter lot is free. The commuter lot is located on Vail Avenue between St. James and Fremont. Enter from Vail Avenue or St. James.
 

Posted by aharder on 11/20/18
 

Two English as a Second Language (ESL) students recently had the opportunity to communicate not only through English, but also through the language of music, thanks to the library’s Tea & Talk program, a monthly social group that offers participants an opportunity to improve their conversation skills.
 
Piano teacher Yu Konno moved from Japan to Arlington Heights two years ago without knowing English. She began taking a Beginner ESL class at the library in September 2016 and later met her current tutor, Kathi Lieb, in March 2018. Hyejin Bae, a flutist from South Korea, was also matched with Lieb in March.
 
"She has been so helpful and encouraging," Bae said. "She always listens to my needs and really cares about improving my life here in this country. She also loves music very much, and that helps a lot too."
 
As Lieb worked with Bae and Konno, she learned that both women are classically trained musicians. Bae began playing the flute at 10 years old and graduated from Northern Illinois University's Performer's Certificate program. Konno started playing the piano at 11 and graduated from the Tokyo College of Music. Lieb soon realized she could organize a concert performance featuring her two musical students.
 
"They [had] to speak English together, that's the trick," Lieb said, pointing out that English was the only language Bae and Konno shared.
 
The two met once a week for three weeks and worked on four performances total, which ranged from the classical music of Gabriel Fauré to the song "Beauty and the Beast." The meetings tested both their ability to communicate with one another and their writing skills.
 
On the day of the performance, Tea & Talk met in the library's Hendrickson Room, with Konno and Bae playing for an audience from young children to adults.
 
"Of course I was so nervous and scared," Konno said. "I was able to calm down when I played a few measures because I felt that the guests welcomed our performance. When we played the last piece, I still wanted to keep on playing music."
 
Bae and Konno also performed together at the Arlington Heights Senior Center in November. It was the first time the two had publicly performed since Tea & Talk. 
 
“It was not a difficult decision to continue. We have good chemistry," Bae said. "It is true that we have some language and culture barriers, but music is a common language that brings everyone together.”
 
Learn more about ESL & Literacy services at ahml.info/services/esl_literacy and see more ESL programs in our calendar. To volunteer to be a tutor in the library's ESL department, call 847-870-4309 or email esl@ahml.info. .
 

Posted by paichele on 11/13/15
 
"I think I'm still a short storyteller at heart," author Cristina Henríquez told an audience of 200+ during an appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Thursday evening, November 12. Cristina spoke about her novel, The Book of Unknown Americans, which was chosen as the 2015 One Book, One Village selection by the library. In an interview-style program moderated by Info Services Librarian Mike Monahan, Cristina spoke candidly about her book which she originally wrote as a short story before expanding - a task which took five years to complete and tells the story of two families who have immigrated to the United States from Latin America and their neighbors living in a Delaware apartment complex.
 
"The second you hear someone's story, or imagine their story, it becomes so much harder to be intolerant," she said. "One of the goals of the book was to keep poking at stereotypes."
 
Following the 50-minute conversation on-stage, the author fielded questions from the audience which included sharing insights on the editing and publishing process.

Earlier in the program when asked to describe the meaning of home, Henríquez responded, "Home is not a place. To me, home is a feeling. It's that feeling when your soul sighs."

The Metropolis event capped off a day-long exchange between the author and the Arlington Heights community about The Book Unknown Americans. Earlier at the library, she did a short reading from the novel for an audience in the Cardinal Room and met in the Hub with more than 80 students from three District 214 schools.

 


 
District 214 students meet One Book, One Village author in the Hub
 
What better way to learn about a book than to meet its author. That's what happened for more than 80 high school students who had the opportunity to meet Cristina Henríquez, author of The Book of Unknown Americans, during her November 12 visit to Arlington Heights and the library for One Book, One Village. 
 
The students gathered in the Hub from three schools - John Hersey High School, Rolling Meadows High School and District 214's Newcomer Center - and spent more than an hour with Cristina asking questions about the book, its characters and what it takes to be an author.
 
"It took me five years to write this book and there were days when it really was a struggle and I wondered if I'd ever finish it," she told the students. Henríquez later added, "The best thing you can do for your writing is to forget that anyone is ever going to read it and just write."
 
 
 

 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy