Posts tagged with "In the news"

Posted by wtolan on 12/08/17
 
Thank you to all of our wonderful customers, staff and community groups who helped contribute to the Arlington Heights Memorial Library's Holiday Book Drive throughout the past few weeks. 770 books were generously donated for infants, children and teens for Wheeling Township's Adopt-a-Family program. Special thanks go to library staff and volunteers, the Board of Library Trustees members, the Lakeshore Circle Book Club, the Rolling Green Nine-Hole Golf League and Girl Scout Troop 40792. The library has donated 17,132 books to children and teens in need since it introduced the Holiday Book Drive in 1998. Thank you again for helping provide the gift of literacy in our community during the holidays.

Posted by aharder on 07/14/17

As of August 1, the AHML mobile app will be discontinued. You will still be able to manage your account, search our catalog, and register for programs on your phone or tablet using our mobile-friendly website, http://www.ahml.info.

We encourage our app users to bookmark our mobile menu screen at http://www.ahml.info/mobile.html. You will still be able to manage your account, search our catalog, place a hold and register for programs on your phone or tablet using our mobile-friendly website. The mobile site is accessible from any browser. By August 1, the library’s mobile website will have the added feature of allowing you to display your barcode on your mobile device. Navigate to My Account as of August 1, and you’ll see an option to display your library card’s barcode. You can then use this barcode at our self-checkout stations or at our Checkout Desk in the library. 

Feel free to contact the library for assistance.
 
If you would like to create an icon on your device's home screen so you still can access our website quickly, follow the instructions below:

For Android Devices:
Chrome
1. Open the Chrome app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Select the Options button (located in the top right corner of the app)
4. Select "Add to Home Screen"
5. Name your bookmark and click Add
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen

Firefox
1. Open the Firefox app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Select the Options button (located in the top right corner of the app)
4. Select "Page"
5. Select "Add to Home Screen"
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen

For iPhone and Apple Devices
1. Open the Safari app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Tap the Share button at the bottom of the screen
4. Select "Add to Home Screen"
5. Name your bookmark and save it
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen
If you have any questions, please contact the library for assistance
 

Posted by wtolan on 11/15/17
 
“Here’s where it all began, at the library. That’s why I’m able to stand where I am and share my passion for books,” said New York Times bestselling author Laura Numeroff, known for books such as If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, Raising a Hero and What Mommies Do Best/What Daddies Do Best.
 
Numeroff spoke to an audience of over 200 adults and children in the library’s Hendrickson Room on Sunday, November 12. She showed some of her favorite books (Harry the Dirty Dog, Eloise, Stuart Little), talked about her early life, showed her favorite pages from her books and answered questions during a Q&A session.
 
During her appearance, Numeroff read If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, which led to laughter and amusement from the crowd.
 
She also read her book Raising a Hero, which tells the story of a puppy training to become a service dog. The book is a part of her new series, Work for Biscuits, which tells the stories of dogs who have jobs.
 
Canine Companions for Independence (CCI) brought along several service dogs in training to the event. One dog named Danica went on stage to show attendees how it is trained to pick up medicine if it falls on the floor. Numeroff later told the audience that a dollar from every copy of Raising a Hero that is purchased will be given to CCI.
 
After reading her stories, she shed some light on the inspiration behind her other work.
 
“One day I saw a Dalmatian and I just got an image in my head, wouldn’t that dog look funny in red sneakers?” she said as she talked about her book Dogs Don’t Wear Sneakers. Other works she talked about include Sometimes I Wonder If Poodles Like Noodles, Laura Numeroff’s 10-Step Guide to Living with Your Monster and Ponyella.
 
After the event, the library celebrated the work of Laura Numeroff in Kids’ World. Many fun activities were available for children such as arts and crafts based on books like If You Give a Pig a Pancake, beanbag tossing games, a scavenger hunt and a meet-and-greet session with the mouse from If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.
 

Posted by paichele on 11/03/16
 
Albert Einstein was a C student. A messy desk isn't a bad thing, and it's good to surround yourself with wackiness. These were just a few of the facts and nuggets of advice that author Eric Weiner shared with District 214 students during a visit earlier today to Rolling Meadows High School. Weiner's session with the students was the first stop in a day-long visit to Arlington Heights to talk about his book, The Geography of Genius, A Search for the World's Most Creative Places from Athens to Silicon Valley, the library's selection for this year's One Book, One Village community read.
 
"Talent is hitting a mark no one can hit. Genius is hitting a mark no one else can see," Weiner told the students who gathered in the school's Resource Center for a 45-minute session with the author during which he shared insights on creativity, genius and his life as a writer traveling the globe.
 
"I always feel like there is some great wonder around the corner," Weiner said, "You just have to find the corner."
 
More than 300 students at Rolling Meadows High School read The Geography of Genius as summer reading or for a class this fall. Following his talk, the students had an opportunity to ask Weiner questions including, "What is the hardest part of traveling?"
 
"The hardest part of traveling is trusting the universe to provide you with experiences," he said. "Traveling is not about a place but rather it's a new way of looking at things and coming away seeing things differently."

 


Posted by daccurso on 05/31/12

The library is one of the participants in the village’s new Idle Free Arlington campaign initiated to educate and raise awareness about the importance of turning off your engine when you’re just sitting in your car. Read our latest Green Choices blog entry to get more information about this new initiative.

Posted by aharder on 10/20/16

What is punk music? What led to its creation? And what kind of parallels can we see today? These are just a few of the questions that were explored in the library’s Sound Opinions program at Metropolis Performing Arts Centre.

Using a mix of historical perspective, video clips and an audience question-and-answer period, Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot discussed 1977, the year punk music emerged from London and New York, with a crowd of more than 150 music enthusiasts. Punk rock, which has proven influential on everything that's followed, erupted in those two cities out of an uneasy stew of economic inequality, political and racial tensions, budding anger, riots, unrest, and even blackouts and heat waves; and a sense that we all had "no future" -- a time, in other words, not unlike today.
 
Punk is about having an “attitude of defiance” and wearing it proudly, said Kot. The guiding principle was to “take everything negative that’s being thrown at us and throw it back at them.” Bands like the Ramones, Sex Pistols, New York Dolls, Blondie, the Clash, Talking Heads and Wire epitomized this turbulent time in history. The Sound Opinions hosts discussed how “being punk” meant “you didn’t want to be homogenized,” and that this sensibility has repeated itself over time, from grunge to alternative to rap and DIY culture; with a subset of artists always seeking to break away from the norm and rebel.
 
Punk Rock 1977: The Sound of Genius was created for the library in partnership with Metropolis featuring the expertise of Kot, who has worked for the Chicago Tribune since 1990 as a music critic; and DeRogatis, who has worked for the Chicago Sun-Times as a music critic for 15 years and now lectures full-time at Columbia College. Together they brought more than 40 years of experience to this lively conversation examining the idea of particularly "magical" times and places that result in a creative explosion – themes echoed in The Geography of Genius: A Search for the World's Most Creative Places, from Ancient Athens to Silicon Valley, the selected title for this year's One Book, One Village community read.

WBEZ’s Sound Opinions broadcasts to more than 120 radio stations across the country and has produced more than 550 episodes. It can be heard in the Chicago market on WBEZ on Fridays and Saturdays. For more information, visit soundopinions.org. For more information on this year's One Book, One Village community read and its related programs, visit ahml.info/onebook.
 

Posted by paichele on 09/20/16
 
"It's a book about ideas," said Executive Director Jason Kuhl as he spread the word at Monday night's Village board meeting about the library's third annual One Book, One Village community read. Presenting to Mayor Tom Hayes and the village trustees, Kuhl invited all of Arlington Heights to read this year's book choice, The Geography of Genius by Eric Weiner, which explores why creative genius flourishes at specific places and at specific times. The mayor in turn thanked Kuhl and the library "for your dedication in developing more geniuses in the village of Arlington Heights."
 
Check out a copy of the book today. Then join us for An Evening with Author Eric Weiner on Thursday, November 3 beginning at 7 p.m. in the Hendrickson Room. Registration opens on October 1.
 
 

Posted by paichele on 06/20/16
 
Thanks to the more than 600 people who came out on Saturday, June 18 for our first FanCon, a five-hour, library-wide celebration of all things comic and pop culture. All ages turned out, many dressed as their favorite superhero characters, and enjoyed comic-themed activities including meeting comic book artists to participating in drawing workshops, storytimes, DIY crafts, gaming competitions and taking photos with costumed characters from Star Wars and the Ghostbusters. Read more in the Daily Herald or check out the fun on Instagram.

Posted by aharder on 03/11/16
 
Do you have old home movies, photos or slides you need digitized? Wish you could record an oral history with a loved one who cannot get to the library’s recording studio? Need better tools to take professional photos of products for your business? With new equipment available from the library’s Studio, you can get creative with video, music, graphic design, digitization, photography and more.
 
New Features:
• Adobe’s Creative Cloud, featuring Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign
• RetroScan, a tool for digitizing 8mm, Super 8mm and 16mm film
• ProTools software for composing, recording, editing and mixing music and soundtracks
• Lighting Cube for product photography
• Recording Kits- bring the Studio home with you
• Wacom Tablet for check-out
• Zoom H4N Handheld Stereo Recorder with Built-in Microphones for check-out
 
Other Studio Equipment:
• Tools for digitizing VHS, cassettes, vinyl, photos, slides and more
• Logic Pro X and Garageband
• iMovie and Final Cut X
• Soundproof booth, electric drum kit and keyboards for recording
• Lighting, backdrops and cameras for video and photography
• GoPro cameras for check-out
 

The Studio is located on the first floor. Schedule a one-on-one appointment to use the Studio or attend an upcoming tech class. Call 847-392-0100 to make a reservation or book online at ahml.info/studio. View tech classes at ahml.info/techclasses. Learn more about the Studio at ahml.info/studio. The Studio is funded by the Friends of the Library.

 

Posted by paichele on 01/30/17
 
What is fake news?
The Internet is full of viral misinformation. Fake news is a false news story designed to look like credible information and makes it difficult to decipher fact from fiction. Fake news typically spreads fast online. How can we wade through it? Always reflect on how you encountered the story. Was it promoted on a website? Did it show up in a social media feed? Was it sent to you by someone you know? Trace the story to its original source.

Here are some other helpful steps to analyze news sources and tools for fact checking.

Put it to the CRAAP Test:
Currency—Can you find a date of the article or photograph? When was it last updated?
Relevance—Who is the intended audience? How does the source meet your needs?
Accuracy—Is the information supported by evidence? Does it cite other sources?
Authority—Who is the author? What are their credentials?
Purpose—Does the site give facts or opinions? Does it have a clear bias?
 
Is it true? Check out these unbiased fact-checking websites:
Snopes
Independent, self-sufficient entity wholly owned by its operators who investigate rumors.
 
Factcheck
Non-partisan, non-profit which acts as a consumer advocate for voters. A project of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania
 
Politifact
Independent fact checking website created by the Tampa Bay Times newspaper. PolitiFact has won the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting
 
Where does the bias lie in the media?
Check out this study from the Pew Research Institute
 
Other resources and articles about Fake News
When Fake News Stories Make Real News Headlines

Looking for more information? Contact a Specialty Info Librarian at questions@ahml.info.
 
 

 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy