Posts tagged with "Literacy"

Posted by wtolan on 12/08/17
 
Thank you to all of our wonderful customers, staff and community groups who helped contribute to the Arlington Heights Memorial Library's Holiday Book Drive throughout the past few weeks. 770 books were generously donated for infants, children and teens for Wheeling Township's Adopt-a-Family program. Special thanks go to library staff and volunteers, the Board of Library Trustees members, the Lakeshore Circle Book Club, the Rolling Green Nine-Hole Golf League and Girl Scout Troop 40792. The library has donated 17,132 books to children and teens in need since it introduced the Holiday Book Drive in 1998. Thank you again for helping provide the gift of literacy in our community during the holidays.

Posted by aharder on 12/14/15
 
Thank you to all of our wonderful customers, staff and community groups, 558 books were donated for children and teens for Wheeling Township’s Adopt-a-Family program. Special thanks go to library staff, the Rolling Green Nine-Hole Golf League and Chamber of Commerce Professional Women’s Council. Teen books were identified as a particular need this year, and Arlington Heights answered our call for materials needed for a broader age of readers, with many titles donated for teens and tweens. Since starting the holiday book drive in 1998, the library has donated 15,031 books to children in need. Thank you for helping provide the gift of literacy in our community during the holidays!

Posted by paichele on 10/18/16
 
It’s never too early to start reading to babies, toddlers and preschoolers to help develop early literacy skills. Research shows children become readers on the lap of a caring adult and the more books children ages 0-5 hear, the more prepared they will be to learn how to read later on.
 
1000 Books Before Kindergarten is a reading program for young children that began at the library in September 2014. Last year 38 area preschools and 702 individuals participated. Although 1000 books sounds like a lot, it’s only three shared reading sessions a day for a year. So how does it work?
 

• Register here or in Kids’ World.
• Start reading and counting.
• Drop by Kids’ World to check in and receive prizes.
• The program continues until your child enters kindergarten.
• Find more details at ahml.info/1000books.

 
 
How to Grow a Reader
  • Reading aloud to your child is the single most important thing you can do to help your child be ready to read.
  • We can help you find age-appropriate titles and topics for your child. Ask a librarian for help in choosing books for your baby, toddler or preschooler.
  • You are your child’s first and best teacher. Children learn best through playful interaction with a caring adult.
  • Talk, sing, read, write and play! Engaging in these five practices with your child will help him or her develop early literacy skills.
  • To learn more, sign up for our quarterly Ready to Read eNewsletter.

Posted by aharder on 07/31/15

Shared reading is the best way to help babies, toddlers, and preschoolers develop the important early literacy skills they need to learn how to read independently later on. The more books children ages 0–5 hear, the more prepared they will be to learn how to read. It’s never too early to start.
 
1000 Books Before Kindergarten is a reading program for young children. Although 1000 books sounds like a lot, it’s only three shared reading sessions a day for a year. So how does it work?

• Register online at ahml.info/1000books or in Kids’ World.
• Start reading and counting!
• Drop by Kids’ World to check in and receive prizes. 
• The program continues until your child enters kindergarten. 
• Find more details at ahml.info/1000books
 

Helping your child develop early literacy begins with cuddling up and sharing a good book. Research shows that children become readers on the lap of a caring adult. Join us as we reach for 1000!

 
How to Grow a Reader
  • Reading aloud to your child is the single most important thing you can do to help your child be ready to read.
  • We can help you find age-appropriate titles and topics for your child. Ask a librarian for help in choosing books for your baby, toddler or preschooler.
  • You are your child’s first and best teacher. Children learn best through playful interaction with a caring adult.
  • Talk, sing, read, write and play! Engaging in these five practices with your child will help him or her develop early literacy skills.
  • To learn more, sign up for our quarterly Ready to Read eNewsletter.

Posted by aharder on 10/16/18
 
Homework Helpers in the Library
 
Teen volunteers are available in Kids' World select Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
See the calendar for dates.
Struggling with a class or need homework help? Teen volunteers can assist with completing homework assignments or practicing skills. Check ahml.info for a complete list of times when Helpers are available.
 
Online Tools for Research, Homework and More
 
Encyclopedia Britannica: The world-renowned reference tool, with articles, images, videos and helpful links on almost every topic (countries, people, animals, science, etc.). Three versions: For Children, For Young Adults and Reference Center. 1st grade-adult.
 
Student Resources in Context: Reference articles, overviews and magazine journal articles on all topics. Helpful at term paper time! 5th grade-adult.
 
PebbleGo: For emergent readers--short articles and videos about animals, science, biographies and social science. Grades K-2. 
 
Core Concepts (Biology, Chemistry & Periodic Table): Overview articles to help understand important scientific principles. Grades 7-12. 
 
CultureGrams: Detailed overviews of all the world’s countries: government, population, daily life, etc. Grades 3-12. 
 
Visual Thesaurus: Love wordplay? Use Visual Thesaurus to explore connections between words and build your vocabulary. Read fun, informative articles about the interesting ways in which we use words. There’s even an online spelling be you can join. Also great for ESL learners. 6th grade-adult.
 
Testing & Education Reference Center: Online test prep for ACT, the new SAT, GRE, MCAT, LSAT, GED etc., as well as several vocational tests (ASVAB, PRAXIS, etc.) and language/citizenship tests. High school students can do college and scholarship searches, and job seekers can use a resume-building tool. 10th grade-adult.
 
National Geographic Kids: Pictures, books and magazine articles about animals, science, history, cultures, the environment and more. Grades K-8. 
 
 
 
 
 

Posted by paichele on 01/30/17
 
What is fake news?
The Internet is full of viral misinformation. Fake news is a false news story designed to look like credible information and makes it difficult to decipher fact from fiction. Fake news typically spreads fast online. How can we wade through it? Always reflect on how you encountered the story. Was it promoted on a website? Did it show up in a social media feed? Was it sent to you by someone you know? Trace the story to its original source.

Here are some other helpful steps to analyze news sources and tools for fact checking.

Put it to the CRAAP Test:
Currency—Can you find a date of the article or photograph? When was it last updated?
Relevance—Who is the intended audience? How does the source meet your needs?
Accuracy—Is the information supported by evidence? Does it cite other sources?
Authority—Who is the author? What are their credentials?
Purpose—Does the site give facts or opinions? Does it have a clear bias?
 
Is it true? Check out these unbiased fact-checking websites:
Snopes
Independent, self-sufficient entity wholly owned by its operators who investigate rumors.
 
Factcheck
Non-partisan, non-profit which acts as a consumer advocate for voters. A project of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania
 
Politifact
Independent fact checking website created by the Tampa Bay Times newspaper. PolitiFact has won the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting
 
Where does the bias lie in the media?
Check out this study from the Pew Research Institute
 
Other resources and articles about Fake News
When Fake News Stories Make Real News Headlines

Looking for more information? Contact a Specialty Info Librarian at questions@ahml.info.
 
 

Posted by wtolan on 12/13/18
 
This year's Winter Reading Challenge will take place from Monday, December 17 to Sunday, January 27. To participate, pick up your Winter Reading Challenge log at the Kids' World Desk starting Monday, December 17.
 
Age 0-4
It is never to early to build your child's literacy skills. By starting early, you form the foundation for your child's success later in life. Simple activities involving talking, singing, reading, writing and playing together will help your child. Check off each of the activities you complete. When you have completed ten, bring the log back and select a free book to take home.
 
Age 5-Grade 3
Determine your own Winter Reading Challenge goal. Whether you keep track of pages, books or time spent reading, use the log to mark your progress. When you are done, come in and select your free book. During the program, drop by the Kids' World Desk to spin our wheel and receive an activity to take home.
 
Grades 4-6
Challenge yourself to read something new. Pick up a punch card and a token at the Kids' World Desk to get started. Let the Challenge Contraption decide your next book or activity. Complete four challenges to earn a free book!

Posted by aharder on 03/11/16
 
Launchpads Take Off in Kids’ World
 
New Launchpad learning tablets are now available for check-out in Kids’ World. Each tablet is pre-loaded with learning games for children. Search “launchpad” at ahml.info to see available tablets and games or look for them in the STEM area in Kids’ World.

Posted by aharder on 06/14/17
 
Heading abroad over the summer? Make sure to learn the language. The library offers a number of free online language-learning tools:

• Little Pim: Fun, easy lessons for kids, pre-K to 2nd grade. It covers Spanish, French, Chinese, Italian, Japanese, Hebrew, English, German, Arabic, Russian.
• Mango Languages: Lively introductory lessons for 72 languages. Special “Conversations” lessons give you a quick-start. Some language lessons also have full-length foreign-language feature films (for adult audiences) to help improve your language comprehension.
• Pronunciator: Covers over 80 languages. Many have “8-Week Travel Prep” lessons and scheduled “Live Conversation” sessions that let you talk in real-time with a Pronunciator representative. Kids can use their special “Young Learners” lessons. Pronunciator is a more in-depth resource and includes a special evaluation tool to help improve your pronunciation skills.
 
Both Mango and Pronunciator are also valuable tools for learning English as a Second Language (ESL).
 

Posted by aharder on 11/20/18
 
The Arlington Heights Memorial Library announced the appointment of Mike Driskell as the new Executive Director following a unanimous vote by the Board of Library Trustees at its regularly scheduled meeting on Tuesday, November 20.

Driskell “is the best leader for our library,” said Board of Library Trustees President Debbie Smart, “His honesty, integrity and demonstrated work ethic are impressive. The board has the utmost confidence in Mike Driskell as a person who has the vision, values, professionalism and dedication to continue moving the library forward in addressing the needs of our community.”

The board engaged executive search firm John Keister and Associates in Vernon Hills to conduct a national search to fill the position in June 2018. Keister worked with the board to present a group of four finalists earlier this month.

A 13-year veteran of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library, Driskell has served as the interim executive director since September 2017. He was named the library’s director of administration in November 2016, following 11 years of service as the information technology manager. Driskell has an undergraduate degree in computer information systems from Elmhurst College and is enrolled in the Master of Library and Information Science program at Dominican University.

An Arlington Heights resident since 2005, Driskell is an active member of the Arlington Heights community and served as the 2017 chairman of the board of directors at the Arlington Heights Chamber of Commerce.
 

 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy