Posts tagged with "study skills"

Posted by Trixie on 11/29/13
Recently GoldieBlox, a California toy company, parodied “Girls” a Beastie Boys song. If you’ve never heard the song, it’s had its share of criticism for being sexist. Its lyrics joke that girls are only good for cleaning, doing the dishes, and laundry. GoldieBlox re-worded the song to encourage girls to explore the fields of science, technology, and engineering. Their use of the song without permission recently initiated discussion of copyright infringement versus fair use.
 
Copyright falls under the legal regulations, known as intellectual-property law, that govern an individual's or organization's right to use or disseminate ideas or information. Copyright deals specifically with the rights granted to a creator, publisher, or other owner of original content to reproduce, adapt, or distribute said content. You might think that intellectual-property law has nothing to do with you, but if you’ve ever created a slideshow and used your favorite songs as the soundtrack, mashed up content to make a funny video, or made a copy of a CD/DVD for a friend, it does apply. Here’s a video that’ll give you a review of copyright principles.
 
 
Some copyright-related terms defined:
copyleft agreements: an alternative to placing works in the public domain or under traditional copyright laws; works can be modified as long as derivative works retain the same restrictions stipulated by the author of the original work. digital rights management (DRM): technological mechanisms to prevent content from being copied or shared over networks.
fair use doctrine: permits moderate use of copyrighted materials for education, news reporting, parody, criticism, and even home consumption in some cases as long as the use does not detract from the market value of the work.
intellectual-property law: legal regulations that govern an individual's or organization's right to use or disseminate ideas or information; encompasses copyright, patent, and trademark laws.
orphan works: copyrighted works whose owners are difficult or impossible to find.
public domain: legal status of a work that is not copyrighted by choice of owner or expiration of copyright term; anyone can use the work in any way they choose without cost.
 
If you want the details on copyright law and fair use, check out the US Copyright Office website.
 

Posted by alice on 05/28/13
A chill just ran down my spine and it's 73º out in Arlington Heights.  This can only mean one thing... it's time for finals.
 
Finals week was something I dreaded every semester.  A week of tests is not something I look forward to, personally.  But I know from speaking to the high schoolers who come into The Hub, that it's a time that some of you actually don't mind.  One last push of pure effort and then you're rewarded with summer vacation, after all!
 
Well if you're studying for finals in these next couple of weeks, I wanted to share some awesome study tools with you to (possibly) help you study!
 
Noises to Help You Study
 
Apps to Help You Study
 
A Place to Help You Study
We're transforming The Hub into a Finals Study Lounge!  So come by The Hub and get your study on!  We'll also have snacks from Whole Foods and special relaxation sessions!
 
Saturday, June 1 from 12:00 PM to 5:30 PM
Sunday, June 2 from 12:00 PM to 5:30 PM  [Therapy Dogs from 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM]
Monday, June 3 from 12:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Tuesday, June 4 from 12:00 PM to 9:00 PM [Yoga Session from 4:00 PM to 4:30 PM]
Wednesday, June 5 from 12:00 PM to 9:00 PM [Yoga Session from 4:00 PM to 4:30 PM]
Thursday, June 6 from 12:00 PM to 9:00 PM
 

Posted by Trixie on 10/17/13
This week I did a database presentation for District 25's Young Entrepreneurs Academy. I showed them how to access library databases, gave them some  tips on searching databases and the web, and went over evaluating online sources.
 
Well, I'm sure that EVERYONE can use some research help. Here are some of the tips I gave in the presentation and the handout.
 
Of course, you can always come into the Hub for help, email, Tweet, or Facebook message us too!
 
 
Search Strategies:
• Boolean Searching: Use operators to narrow or broaden your search. AND and NOT will narrow your search. OR will broaden your search. Quotation marks will search for a specific string of words (e.g. “moving truck”)
• Use the database's built-in filters to drill down to the most relevant search results.
• Read summary or abstract to determine whether an article will be useful. It will save you time!
• Want to cite an article? Check to see if there is a built-in citation generator on the webpage. If not, Purdue's Online Writing Lab has APA, MLA, and Turabian style guides.
• Searching the web? Evaluate your sources! Use the CRAAP or SMELL test.
 
 
Reference & Information sign
Photo Credit: olinlibref

Posted by Trixie on 01/06/14
One Stop Shop sign
Photo Credit: marc e marc
 
I'm sure everyone is heartbroken about school being closed today and tomorrow. With two weeks off for winter break, you didn't really need a couple of extra days off, right? Well, if you're fretting about upcoming final exams and projects instead of the polar vortex, come into the Hub for a place to study and to get research help!
 
I'm resurrecting a few research tips that I posted a few months ago below. They might come in handy with end-of-semester projects and papers.
 
We'll also be turning the Hub into a Finals Study Lounge on Saturday, January 11th - Thursday, January 16th. Join us for brain friendly snacks, stress relieving therapy dogs, and yoga sessions. We'll have laptops, iPads, and other supplies to help you survive finals!
 
Here are the aforementioned tips. Of course, you can always come into the Hub for help, email, Tweet, or Facebook message us too!
 
Search Strategies:
• Boolean Searching: Use operators to narrow or broaden your search. AND and NOT will narrow your search. OR will broaden your search. Quotation marks will search for a specific string of words (e.g. “moving truck”).
• Use the database's built-in filters to drill down to the most relevant search results.
• Read summary or abstract to determine whether an article will be useful. It will save you time!
• Want to cite an article? Check to see if there is a built-in citation generator on the webpage. If not, Purdue's Online Writing Lab has APA, MLA, and Turabian style guides.
• Searching the web? Evaluate your sources! Use the CRAAP or SMELL test.