Posts tagged with "DIY"

Posted by tspicer on 12/23/15
Looking for something to do this Winter Break? Why not mess around with new Hub STEM Kits. Ask at the Hub desk for details! This Kit is called 'Electric Message'. While working with this kit, you will learn about circuitry, electroluminescent wire, and more. You'll shoot video of your message and send out to a friend on Social Media!
 

Posted by Trixie on 07/06/15
 
This month in the HUB we’re repurposing vinyl records into small notebooks. Stop by, make your notebook and complete a challenge for the teen summer Read to the Rhythm program!
 
Too busy? Don’t fret – here are the instructions for you to tackle this project at home!
 
 
SAFETY FIRST – use protective eyewear while scoring and breaking your record to the perfect size!
 
1.       Cut record to the size for notebook cover.
· Use ruler and utility knife to score* vinyl.
*Run blade along ruler to cut shallow channel on surface of record.
· Use the edge of a table to break record along scored line.
2.       Prepare pages of your notebook.
· Cut pages to size – about the length of the cover laid flat.
· Fold in half to form a book.
· Use stapler or thread to bind pages.
3.       Construct your notebook.
·  Align cover and pages of notebook.
· Use duct tape to form cover. Tape along flat edges leaving room for the thickness of your notebook pages.
· Attach first and last page to the front and back cover to form the notebook.
 
 
Adapted from Gem & Em.
 

Posted by amypelman.res on 05/13/13
 
We had a great program last Saturday.  Here are some photos of the awesome tattoos we made:
If you want to make your own, it's pretty easy.  Here's how:
 
Supplies:
1. Stencils.  We used adhesive contact paper to cut out shapes and stick on the skin to be painted in.  The best stencils are made using an exact-o knife, so if you go that route - be very, very careful!  Try to get a cutting mat surface to use because that makes it a lot easier.  You could also tape pre-made paper stencils to your skin, but they are a little tougher to work with than the contact paper.
2. Eye shadow.
3. Liner Sealer (this one is about $10.00 on amazon, not including shipping).  Sephora sells one by "Make up Forever" that is $22.00. 
 
How you do it:
Scrape some eye shadow into a small container (even a soda bottle cap will work).  Add 3 or 4 drops of liner sealer and mix with a paintbrush.  Fill in your stencil using the paintbrush, or the little applicators that come with the eye shadow.  Peel off your stencil.  Voila!  It's now a waterproof tattoo that should last a few days!  Want a little more detail or a different explanation?  Here's where I got the idea.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Posted by meyoung on 05/06/18
This month, stop by the DIY area to make popsockets! Super easy and fun to make, these are perfect to upgrade your phone for free.
 
You will need:
2 Suction cups
Hot glue
Decorative paper
Scissors
Pen/Pencil
 
Directions:
1. Remove metal hooks from suction cups
2. Hot glue the two suction cups together (little end to little end).
 
 
3. Use the suction cup wide end as a stencil for the decorative paper. Cut out.
4. Glue paper to the wide end of one of the suction cups.
 
 
Rock it.
 
 

Posted by meyoung on 07/31/17
We've been whipping through cat toys, so here's a cat teaser. Remember: by completing this volunteer project, it gets you one step closer to finishing the Summer Reading Program.
 
Step 1: Take two non-bendy straws or a wooden dowel
Step 2: Grab a t-shirt scrap (approximately 4” by 6”) and cut it into ¼“ wide and 4” long strips
Step 3: Lay out a piece of tape about 7 inches long
Step 4: With the sticky side up, lay out the strips on the top (leave some space at the top of the tape)
 
 
Step 5: Place the straw onto the end of the tape covered with fabric strips
Step 6: Roll the tape until the tape is wrapped around the end of the straw.
 
Follow these steps and you'll have the .... wait for it... purrrrrfect... cat toy.
 

Posted by emather. on 05/29/14
This past Saturday, teens met in the Training Center at the library to use video editing and effects tools to add Star Wars special effects to some videos. We started with footage of some Star Wars finger puppets (made as part of the DIY craft in the HUB this month) in front of a green screen, like this:
 
 
 
 
Then we used a new tool on library computers called SaberFX that let us draw different visual effects over the footage, like light sabers, blasters, explosions, and lightning. Then we rendered those videos and used iMovie to edit them, add backgrounds over the green screen, and add music and sound effects. We ended up with some pretty great quick videos with really creative ideas. (I don't know if Jabba the Hutt will be able to shoot lightning out of his eyeballs in the new movies, but he really should.) Check some out below, and be sure to come by and try out the software yourself. Maybe for your submission to the 8th Annual Teen Film Fest?
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 

Posted by Trixie on 07/23/13
On Friday, we 3D scanned, modeled, and printed portraits for 16 teens in the library's Marketplace. Don't know much about 3D printing? Basically, a digital model can be "printed" into a three-dimensional, solid object using this technology. Here's an infographic and a video that explains the process.
 
Jesse DePinto from Voxel Metric, Inc. was here to scan and 3D model the participants' heads. Check out the gallery of 3D models - you can get a 360° view of the busts that were printed!
 
 
Andrew Morrison from Workshop 88 joined us to demo his Makerbot Replicator 2 and 3D print the portraits.
 
AHML's own resident maker Chris Krueger (aka The New Hobbyist) showed off some of his prints and answered audience questions too!
 
Below is a video recap of the program. You can check out more video and photos from the program on the Digifii website.
 

Posted by meyoung on 06/19/17
Here's another opportunity for you to fulfill your volunteer step in the Summer Reading Program. We're making sleeping mats out of plastic bags, and then donating them to homeless shelters. Come on over to the HUB and we'll get you started!
 
 
 
Materials Needed: 
 - Plastic Bags (Lots and lots of plastic bags)
 - Scissors
 
How to make Plarn (Plastic Bag Yarn)
1. Lay bag flat
2. Cut off the bag
3. Cut off the handles. (Cut all the way across)
4. Squish together to make a loop

**Pro tip: You can cut more than one bag at a time**

How to Continue a Started Mat (Start at 10:27)
1.  Curve braided end so that you’ll be working side-by-side with the already completed row
2. Take your weaver (this is the plarn that was not included in the braid) and weave over the plarn that it’s closest to, under the next, and then over and around the last one.
3. Keep your weaver moving by going back toward the completed row (over the first and under the last one)
4. Find an opening in the completed row and pull your weaver through
5. Repeat steps 2-4 until you reach the same length as the completed rows.
6. When you get the length you want, weave your weaver away from the completed rows (do not weave back in)
7. With the weaver separated, braid the remaining three plarn 6 times. You just finished a row!

**If your plarn is getting short, attach a new plarn by tying a knot (start at 4:07)**
 
Of course, if you need help, stop by the desk!
 

Posted by Trixie on 06/13/13
 
We’re launching another activity in the Hub: the Take Apart Cart!

The Make It summer program is in full swing - we’ve signed up over 170 teens and some participants have already earned 2 of the 3 required stamps to be a finisher. Here’s another activity that can earn you a MAKER stamp.

An important step in making something is understanding how it works: the mechanics, the components used, design based on function, etc. A great way to learn about how something works is to thoughtfully take it apart or unmake it. Without further ado, we’d like to introduce the Hub’s Take Apart Cart: a library cart overflowing with old tech and other stuff for you to take apart and learn from! Join us in the DIY area, Monday-Friday between 2-4 p.m. The Cart, tools, and staff will be available for your unmaking needs. Learn about how a clock works or what components go into making a laptop.

What will we do with the pieces you've taken apart? You can either try to remake it or repurpose the parts to make something new. Hopefully, this has piqued your interest enough to come check out what we have for you to unmake beginning on Monday, June 17th.

Posted by Trixie on 06/27/14
 
Yesterday, we learned some basic movie-making principles and explored the equipment and resources the library has to offer. Then, each team was given a filming assignment with specific instructions to hone their visual thinking skills. Here's one of the videos that resulted: the challenge was to film a subject ascending and descending stairs. Heather H., Lynette H., and Emma K., great job!
 
 
Want to learn more about film-making? Come into the Hub for help with your film, to use video editing software, or to check out cameras, tripods, and more!
 
We're accepting submissions for the 8th Annual Film Fest! Get the specs and register for upcoming film-making class here.

 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy