Posts tagged with "romance"

Posted by Ultra Violet on 06/27/11
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An American scholar studying in France finds a box of mementos from a woman who lived through WWI. What he doesn't know is that the box of romantic items, including love letters, was planted for him by a secret admirer as a test of his romantic potential. From a distance she evaluates his reactions to his findings. The mementos are shown throughout the book as images that are photographs and scans of real items that the author had found and inspired the novel. There are barcodes in the book for Smartphone scanning to view the images.

Posted by jmurrow-res on 01/18/15
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A stunningly ambitious and beautifully written novel, All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr is the story of Marie Laure, a girl living in Paris in the late 1930s  who at the ages of six goes blind, forcing her, and though a series of  beautifully intricate  descriptions, the reader, to experience the world through touch, sound, and memory.  It is also the story of Werner, an orphan living in Germany who becomes enchanted with a crude radio he finds.  Becoming a master radio operator, he is eventually drawn into the German military where he is sent to occupied Paris to track the resistance.  As the Second World War rages around them, the girl who cannot see and the boy who is forced to listen discover each other, and through each other love and hope, as they try to survive the horrors of war.
I thoroughly loved Doerr’s exquisite descriptions in which the drone of bombers, the smell of the sea, and the memory of a street become a world in which morally complex yet innately good characters can discovery hope, even in the middle of a world war.  From page one I fell in love with the Marie and Werner, characters who will keep readers turning the pages hoping for an impossibly happy ending.  Ten years in the writing, All the Light We Cannot See is fantastic novel that I can’t recommend enough!

Posted by Pam I am on 05/06/11
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Barbara O'Neal is a Rita-award winning romance author and this book is certainly  more romance novel than a typical Chick Lit novel.  However, this book  will not disappoint.  This book explores the love of famil yand food and about creating your own second chances.  And, of course romance shows up when you least expect it to.

Posted by Trixie on 03/30/15
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"I start to run, start to turn into air, the blue careening off the sky, careening after me, as I sink into green, shades and shades of it, blending and spinning into yellow, freaking yellow, then head-on colliding in the punk-hair purple of lupine: everywhere. I vacuum it in, all of it, in, in – (SELF-PORTRAIT: Boy Detonates Grenade of Awesome) – getting happy now, the gulpy, out-of-breath kind that makes you feel you have a thousand lives crammed inside your measly one…"
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I absolutely adored this book! It’s beautifully written and had me laughing, crying, and completely giddy. I raced through it like light speeding through the universe.
(SELF-PORTRAIT: Teen Librarian Squealing with Delight)
Jandy Nelson’s I’ll Give You the Sun is about twins Noah and Jude. Like most twins, they are incredibly close; they have an uncanny ability to know what the other is thinking and can finish each other’s sentences. Noah is an eccentric artist. He’s constantly drawing or painting, sometimes just in his head. Jude is a gregarious daredevil. She loves surfing and makes friends easily. The story begins when the twins are thirteen, a time when they’re experiencing change and exploring life. It continues through sixteen when they’ve seemingly switched roles. They’re coming to terms with the heartbreak they’ve felt due to tragedy and loss, tentatively living their lives and trying to rebuild.
The novel shifts between Noah’s and Jude’s perspectives alternating from early to later years. The voices and viewpoints juxtaposed plainly shows that neither character has the whole story. Throughout Noah’s narration, his artist mind is evident: he’s constantly imagining his surroundings in colors and relays how he’d describe the moment on canvas or paper and what he’d name it. Jude’s are filled with quirky wives’ tales and superstition.
Nelson’s writing is lyrical and expressive. The characters and imagery jump off the page. The characters’ confusion, heartache, and elation are felt through description. Nelson weaves a vivid tale of life, loss, and love intertwined with a message about self-identity and being true to yourself.
This is a must-read for romantics, artists, inspiration seekers, and lovers of words!

Posted by Uncle Will on 09/16/15
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What would you do if you were suddenly taken back in time 200 years?
Such is the dilemma for Claire Randall, the main character in Diana Gabaldon's epic novel, Outlander, published in 1991 and recently adapted into a TV mini-series. Claire is a WWII nurse in England who reunites with her husband, post-war, for a second honeymoon in Scotland. While visiting a historic hilltop, Claire is mysteriously transported back to 1743, where she must worry for her life, find the secret to her journey into the past, and somehow overcome immense odds to return to her husband, who is determinedly searching for her in 1945.
This series is well-written, keeping true to Gabaldon's suspenseful plot.  The scenery is breathtaking and the soundtrack perfectly underscores the drama of the period. This series should be the first choice you make for date night with that someone who is special.  It has a little bit of everything:  action, romance, humor, history, and grown men in kilts! 
If you enjoy watching, make sure to place a hold on Outlander Season 1 / Volume 2.


Posted by Ultra Violet on 10/22/11
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A New York man is continually visited by future versions of himself each dispensing advice or warnings. Through all of the craziness of being manipulated by himself, the only thing that he can count on is his unrelenting love for one woman. A strange, funny and charming story.

Posted by Ultra Violet on 02/24/11
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Save as Draft is a novel written as a collection of peoples emails and texts to each other. A quirky romance with social networking as a backdrop. Thoroughly contemporary fiction.

Posted by Auntie Anne. on 07/29/11
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Beautiful, vivacious Cora Cash is the toast of the town.  She is probably the most wealthy and eligible young heiress of the Gilded Age in America, since her father is one of the new American billionaires of the 19th century, making his mark in flour.  Their family mansion in Newport, Rhode Island, puts the Vanderbilts’ down the street to shame.  Her mother’s every move is in gilded and diamond-studded excess, so that there is no doubt who has the most money in town.  Mrs. Cash has determined that the most ideal marriage for her daughter would be to a British nobleman – say, a duke, perhaps.  So Cora and her mother are off to England to find a titled husband for Cora.  Literally, quite by accident, she meets the dark, handsome and mysterious Lord Ivo Maltravers, the Duke of Wareham.  In no time flat, he asks her to marry him.  Everybody’s happy – end of story.  Right?
Not so fast . . . there are a few things not quite right here.  For one thing, our handsome Duke is broke.  So did he marry Cora only for her money?  Does he really love her?  For sure, Cora is madly in love with her husband, which is also problematic.  Since there appears that Ivo might be having an affair under Clara’s nose.  Clara soon finds out that money can’t buy happiness, especially under the critical eye of the “Double Duchess,”  Ivo’s jealous and deceitful mother.  The rigid traditions of Victorian-era British aristocracy make mincemeat of Clara’s attempts at making a name for herself in the London social scene, to the point of humiliation.  Can this marriage possibly be saved?

I normally do not read romance novels, but the vivid details of this period in history, the costumes, customs, food, and social lives of the upper class of the Gilded Age really drew me into the story.  The author deftly used the culture clash of American new money vs. Victorian tradition to move the plot along.  There were plenty of twists and turns in the plot, so that you were always second-guessing what you thought was going to happen.  The cast of supporting characters was delightful, including Prince Bertie himself.  The American Heiress is Daisy Goodwin’s debut novel, which came as a surprise to me.  Her writing is excellent and mature.  This was really a fun summer read.

Posted by Ultra Violet on 03/08/11
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The Little Book is a debut novel that took thirty years to write. Wheeler Burden is a wealthy heir of a famous family living in San Francisco in the 80s when he suddenly finds himself in Vienna in 1897. Trying to unravel the mystery of his journey into the past, he gets involved with Sigmund Freud and finds new insight into his family history.

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