Posts tagged with "fantasy"

Posted by Ultra Violet on 01/11/11
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Friesner was called the "First Lady of Funny Fantasy" by Booklist, and although there is quite a bit of humor here, I also found these stories to be rather touching. Two of the stories in this collection are Nebula Award winners. I liked that they are very traditional fantasy stories set in contemporary times.

Posted by Ultra Violet on 05/17/11
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I read this dark, atmospheric tale of the Napoleonic wars and faeries some time ago and loved it. I just found out that a movie is in the works. The New York Times has some information about it.

Posted by Ultra Violet on 05/24/13
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It's the last part of the 19th Century, and an evil Jewish mystic creates an incomparable golem who ends up lost and alone in New York City. Blending in to the human population is hard enough for Chava, but getting involved with Ahmad, a Jinni who has been cruelly trapped in human form thousands of years ago, causes even more complications. Their uneasy alliance stems from their shared situations, but their natures are so far from each other that they are constantly butting heads.When Chava's creator comes to America, Ahmad and Chava must fight for their lives and try and outwit a mastermind with no conscience.
 
The Golem and the Jinni is a fun, fast read with great details of 19th century New York, particularly the Jewish and Syrian neighborhoods and lifestyles. The Jewish tradition of the golem and the Middle Eastern stories of the jinni add a delightful twist.

Posted by Ultra Violet on 12/06/11
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A delicate collection of short stories with a slight tinge of the sinister. Great wintertime reading with a pot of tea. Clarke creates a sensuous world of mystical beings and rich settings.

Posted by Ultra Violet on 09/25/11
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Quentin, Julia, Eliot and Janet are established as the kings and queens of the magical land of Fillory after their harrowing adventures in the first book in this trilogy, The Magicians. It is well worth reading or re-reading the first book because there are many references to specific occurrences from it. The first book set up the story of our anti-hero, Quentin, and how he goes from a depressed introvert in Brooklyn to being a student at an exclusive school for magic. (Yes, it's a bit like Harry Potter, but it is decidedly darker). In this second book, Quentin finds the life of a magician king to be a bit boring. He longs for the days of danger and adventure. When trouble shows up, the others are content to leave it be, but Quentin jumps head-long into the depths of peril, while being forced to face his past and his inner self.
 
There is not quite the happy ending in The Magician King that there was in the first book, but if there is meant to be a third, that makes sense. It is a bit of a cliff-hanger. I have read reviews on both sides of the fence about this one. No one seems to be neutral about this book. You either love it or hate it. I couldn't stop reading it and I closed it thinking, "I can't wait for the next one!"

Posted by bweiner on 07/13/13
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Remember your childhood dreams and nightmares as you drift through the sweeping landscape of the narrator in Neil Gaiman's, The Ocean at the End of the Lane. Imagine you are seven years old again, and your wildest dreams and most horrific nightmares have become reality.
 
The story begins when the narrator returns to his childhood town some forty years later to attend a funeral. He leaves the funeral to avoid the awkward parade of questions about relationships and work, and finds himself driving down the little country lane toward the old Hempstock farm. As he drives, he begins to recall the magic and horror that were unleashed the day he met Lettie Hempstock. Our resourceful narrator uses his love of fantasy and fairy tale to protect his family as the darkness descends...

This enchanting, terrifying and provocative work by Neil Gaiman, a master of multifaceted fantasy, will appeal to anyone who remembers the joy and fear that childhood can bring. If you like this novel, The Book of Lost Things and The Gates, both by John Connolly, will also drop you into a world that is alternately disturbing and delightful.

Posted by Ultra Violet on 07/30/11
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Mervyn Peake wrote three novels in the Gormenghast Series, Titus Groan, Gormenghast, and Titus Alone. He created an original world that has been compared to Tolkein in quality. His wife, Maeve Gilmore, an artist and sculptor, wrote this final novel, Titus Awakes based on the notes left by her husband when he died in the 60's.