Posts tagged with "food"

Posted by jrycombel on 07/20/11
Generally, people aren’t aware when they’re eating foods made with genetically modified organisms (GMOs). According to the Institute for Responsible Technology (www.responsibletechnology.org), genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are made by forcing genes from one species, such as bacteria, viruses, animals, or humans, into the DNA of a food crop or animal to introduce a new trait.
 
Five major GM food crops are soy, corn, canola, cotton, and sugar beets. Many processed foods often have hidden GM sources unless they are organic or labeled non-GMO.  Some products may be made with ingredients derived from GMOs, such as sodas, sweeteners, baked goods, cereals, dressings and oils, soy milk, canned and frozen fruits and vegetables, and vitamins. While no genetically modified fish, chicken or livestock is yet approved for human consumption, many foods are produced from animals raised on GM feed such as grains.
 
There are both pros and cons of genetically engineered foods: for example, faster growing plants and animals verses possible serious health risks. Proponents of non-GMOs in foods advocate labeling of GMOs, more thorough testing for safety, and better regulation.  
 
For tips on how to avoid foods with GMOs and also a list of non-GMO brands, go to www.NonGMOShoppingGuide.com or download the iPhone app: ShopNoGMO.
Another site listing non-GMO products is www.nonGMOProject.org.

Posted by mingh on 04/06/12
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White Truffles in Winter imagines the world of the remarkable French chef Auguste Escoffier (1846-1935), who changed how we eat through his legendary restaurants at the Savoy and the Ritz. A man of contradictions—kind yet imperious, food-obsessed yet rarely hungry—Escoffier was also torn between two women: the famous, beautiful, and reckless actress Sarah Bernhardt and his wife, the independent and sublime poet Delphine Daffis, who refused ever to leave Monte Carlo. In the last year of Escoffier's life, in the middle of writing his memoirs, he has returned to Delphine, who requests a dish in her name as he has honored Bernhardt, Queen Victoria, and many others. How does one define the complexity of love on a single plate? N. M. Kelby brings us the sensuality of food and love amid a world on the verge of war in this work that shimmers with beauty and longing.