"I think I'm still a short storyteller at heart," author Cristina Henríquez told an audience of 200+ during an appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Thursday evening, November 12. Cristina spoke about her novel, The Book of Unknown Americans, which was chosen as the 2015 One Book, One Village selection by the library. In an interview-style program moderated by Info Services Librarian Mike Monahan, Cristina spoke candidly about her book which she originally wrote as a short story before expanding - a task which took five years to complete and tells the story of two families who have immigrated to the United States from Latin America and their neighbors living in a Delaware apartment complex.
"The second you hear someone's story, or imagine their story, it becomes so much harder to be intolerant," she said. "One of the goals of the book was to keep poking at stereotypes."
Following the 50-minute conversation on-stage, the author fielded questions from the audience which included sharing insights on the editing and publishing process.

Earlier in the program when asked to describe the meaning of home, Henríquez responded, "Home is not a place. To me, home is a feeling. It's that feeling when your soul sighs."

The Metropolis event capped off a day-long exchange between the author and the Arlington Heights community about The Book Unknown Americans. Earlier at the library, she did a short reading from the novel for an audience in the Cardinal Room and met in the Hub with more than 80 students from three District 214 schools.


District 214 students meet One Book, One Village author in the Hub
What better way to learn about a book than to meet its author. That's what happened for more than 80 high school students who had the opportunity to meet Cristina Henríquez, author of The Book of Unknown Americans, during her November 12 visit to Arlington Heights and the library for One Book, One Village. 
The students gathered in the Hub from three schools - John Hersey High School, Rolling Meadows High School and District 214's Newcomer Center - and spent more than an hour with Cristina asking questions about the book, its characters and what it takes to be an author.
"It took me five years to write this book and there were days when it really was a struggle and I wondered if I'd ever finish it," she told the students. Henríquez later added, "The best thing you can do for your writing is to forget that anyone is ever going to read it and just write."
This holiday season give the gift of reading by donating new children’s books for our holiday book drive. The books will go to low-income families in our area through the Wheeling Township Adopt-a-Family program. We are collecting new books for children from infancy to age 18. Books for teens and books in Spanish are especially welcome.
Collection Dates: Now through December 1
Location: Drop off your donation in the collection bins by the Checkout Desk.
For more information, call Communications and Marketing Director Deb Whisler at 847-506-2613 or
Swedish Genealogy Research Help
Do you have Swedish ancestors? Kathy Meade, who has more than seven years experience helping people trace their Swedish ancestry, will be available to help you with your Swedish research. Kathy can also direct you to additional Swedish research resources. Please come with your research questions to learn more about your Swedish heritage.
Date and Time: Wednesday, December 16, Noon-7 p.m.
Location: Genealogy appointments are held in the Shackley Room, on the first floor of the library. Click to sign up for available appointment times.
Healthcare: The Affordable Care Act
Are you considering your healthcare options in 2016? Do you have questions about changing plans or want to do some comparison shopping? A representative from Northwest Compass will present an informational session on the Affordable Care Act, Get Covered Illinois, and what you need to know to find the right insurance. For coverage starting in 2016, the Open Enrollment Period is November 1, 2015-January 31, 2016.
Date and time: Tuesday, December 1, 7-8:30 p.m.
Location: Hendrickson Room
One Book, One Village, the library's community-wide reading initiative, topped the agenda at the Village's Board of Trustees meeting on Monday, September 21. Deputy Director Jeremy Andrykowski took to the podium to spread the word about this year's selection, The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henríquez
"This is the second year in a row that the library’s offering One Book, One Village," Andrykowski said, "And the idea is simple – we want to build community by inviting all of Arlington Heights to read the same book at the same time."
Andrykowski introduced a prerecorded video of the author which was played for the mayor, trustees and residents in attendance. 
He concluded his remarks by highlighting the author visit by Cristina Henríquez on Thursday, November 12 which is being presented in partnership with the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre. The interview-style program begins at 7 p.m. followed by a book signing with the author.  Arlington Heights residents can register for this event beginning October 1.
Visit for more information including upcoming programs and book discussions.
The 9th Annual Teen Film Fest is in the books! More than 160 people came to Metropolis Performing Arts Centre to celebrate Arlington Heights' young filmmakers on August 21. This annual event is co-sponsored by the Arlington Heights Memorial Library, Arlington Heights Arts Commission and Metropolis.
Congratulations to the winners:
Best Overall Film - ‘Checkmate’ by Brandon Martin
Best Comedy - ‘Prop Hunt’ by Jared Culm
Best Experimental - ‘Trigger Warning’ by Kathleen Oku
Best Animation - ‘Over the Phone’ by August Graham, Ben Klicker
Best Documentary - ‘Same Molecules’ by Rhegan Graham
Best Music Video - ‘Geronimo’ by Tess Troschuk
Many thanks to this year's judges, Daily Herald Film Critic Dann Gire, former Teen Advisory Board president Selena Groh, and Metropolis Executive Director Joe Keefe.
For more photos from the night's event, see our photo gallery here.
To watch all the films, visit The Hub's You Tube page here.
It was the Summer of STEM at the library. While school was out, the library was full of children of all ages engaging in science and technology.
Children and parents packed the Training Center for an introduction to 3D printing. Just a short walk away, in Kids' World, a group of toddlers and preschoolers were engineering structures from tubes and connectors in a free-play session. Problem-solving skills were on full display as the hard hat-wearing group of young builders figured out which piece connected where. Nearby, another young visitor played on a felt board featuring honey bees and numbers. As her caregiver prompted her to "count the bees," little did she know, she too was learning through STEM free play and toys provided by the library.
View more Summer of STEM photos here.
Visit our Computers and Technology page for more information on upcoming classes and the Studio - your library's digital media lab.

Shared reading is the best way to help babies, toddlers, and preschoolers develop the important early literacy skills they need to learn how to read independently later on. The more books children ages 0–5 hear, the more prepared they will be to learn how to read. It’s never too early to start.
1000 Books Before Kindergarten is a reading program for young children. Although 1000 books sounds like a lot, it’s only three shared reading sessions a day for a year. So how does it work?

• Register online at or in Kids’ World.
• Start reading and counting!
• Drop by Kids’ World to check in and receive prizes. 
• The program continues until your child enters kindergarten. 
• Find more details at

Helping your child develop early literacy begins with cuddling up and sharing a good book. Research shows that children become readers on the lap of a caring adult. Join us as we reach for 1000!

How to Grow a Reader
  • Reading aloud to your child is the single most important thing you can do to help your child be ready to read.
  • We can help you find age-appropriate titles and topics for your child. Ask a librarian for help in choosing books for your baby, toddler or preschooler.
  • You are your child’s first and best teacher. Children learn best through playful interaction with a caring adult.
  • Talk, sing, read, write and play! Engaging in these five practices with your child will help him or her develop early literacy skills.
  • To learn more, sign up for our quarterly Ready to Read eNewsletter.
Arlington Heights has talent! We are looking for family-friendly acts to be part of a Community Talent Show on August 13 at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library. In-person audition times are available Tuesday, July 14 and Monday, July 20 in the Lindsey Room. Sign up for an audition time and view audition requirements here.
    ▶ The Community Talent Show is open to performers ages 6 to adult.
    ▶ Acts should be 5 minutes or less.
    ▶ Longer acts or those with children under 6 years old will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
Email links to video auditions to before July 31 or sign up for a live audition.
Bring the following to the audition:

    ▶ A CD of recorded music required for your audition or your music player
    ▶ A list of your technical requirements for the night of the show - # of microphones, instrument cables. etc.

More than 200 Arlington Heights book lovers turned out after-hours on Saturday, June 27 for An Evening with Candace Bushnell. The sold-out event, presented and co-sponsored by the library and the Tuscan Market Book Group, featured the bestselling author of Sex and the City and Lipstick Jungle who is currently on a national book tour for her newest release, Killing Monica.  During her three-hour appearance in the Hendrickson Room, Candace signed books, took photographs with attendees and delivered a lively onstage presentation including an audience Q&A.
"I like writing about characters that are larger than life," Bushnell said. She revealed that her latest character in Killing Monica  comes from an idea of always having to put our best selves forward in today's social media-crazed world.
"Monica is always happy and smiling and when you see her, you want to be her. Nothing ever goes wrong for Monica so we definitely know she is an imaginary character," Bushnell joked. "The book really is about identity and who we are and how we reinvent ourselves."

The event began with Arlington Heights Mayor Tom Hayes welcoming Candace and proclaiming Saturday, June 27, 2015 as "Candace Bushnell Book Launch Event Day in the Village of Arlington Heights.”  In response Candace told the crowd:

“Libraries mean so much to me. When I was a kid, the library was where we went for our entertainment. There’s a universe out there at your library. I am so touched and so proud to be here.”
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy