Library News

“Here’s where it all began, at the library. That’s why I’m able to stand where I am and share my passion for books,” said New York Times bestselling author Laura Numeroff, known for books such as If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, Raising a Hero and What Mommies Do Best/What Daddies Do Best.
Numeroff spoke to an audience of over 200 adults and children in the library’s Hendrickson Room on Sunday, November 12. She showed some of her favorite books (Harry the Dirty Dog, Eloise, Stuart Little), talked about her early life, showed her favorite pages from her books and answered questions during a Q&A session.
During her appearance, Numeroff read If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, which led to laughter and amusement from the crowd.
She also read her book Raising a Hero, which tells the story of a puppy training to become a service dog. The book is a part of her new series, Work for Biscuits, which tells the stories of dogs who have jobs.
Canine Companions for Independence (CCI) brought along several service dogs in training to the event. One dog named Danica went on stage to show attendees how it is trained to pick up medicine if it falls on the floor. Numeroff later told the audience that a dollar from every copy of Raising a Hero that is purchased will be given to CCI.
After reading her stories, she shed some light on the inspiration behind her other work.
“One day I saw a Dalmatian and I just got an image in my head, wouldn’t that dog look funny in red sneakers?” she said as she talked about her book Dogs Don’t Wear Sneakers. Other works she talked about include Sometimes I Wonder If Poodles Like Noodles, Laura Numeroff’s 10-Step Guide to Living with Your Monster and Ponyella.
After the event, the library celebrated the work of Laura Numeroff in Kids’ World. Many fun activities were available for children such as arts and crafts based on books like If You Give a Pig a Pancake, beanbag tossing games, a scavenger hunt and a meet-and-greet session with the mouse from If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.
The Arlington Heights Memorial Library is now offering two new resources to help aid genealogy and history research. The first is Proquest Historical Newspapers, which adds to the access the library already had for the historical Chicago Tribune (1849-1993). New historical titles include The New York Times (1851-2013), The Chicago Defender (1910-1975), the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (1874-1922), The Baltimore Sun (1837-1991) and The Irish Times/The Weekly Irish Times (1859-2015). These are fully-scanned articles and pages from the original newspapers, complete with photos, advertisements, classifieds, obituaries and death notices, and are especially valuable both to genealogists and students working on history projects (looking for primary sources, historical price information, etc.).
The second resource is American Ancestors, a collection of genealogy databases maintained by the New England Historic Genealogical Society with over 14 billion records pulled from military sources, vital records, family histories, census data, etc. Full access to records is available inside the library. Users outside the library have limited access to freely-available records.
Resources such as Proquest Historical Newspapers can be found by visiting the library's Research webpage and clicking on the Databases tab.
"We choose to live the way we do and participate the way we do," said Dave Eggers to an audience of more than 350 people who packed the Forest View Auditorium on Thursday evening October 12 to hear the award-winning writer, editor and philanthropist speak as he touched on topics like privacy, surveillance and free choice -- all central themes in his dystopian novel The Circle, the 2017 One Book, One Village (OBOV) selection.
In an interview-style program moderated by the library's Info Services Supervisor Pam Schwarting, Eggers settled in and talked about his artistic path, which began in the first grade in the Lake Forest public schools and continued with "an uninterrupted string of awesome teachers" who helped spark his interest in writing. A focus on painting followed in middle school and high school.
"I trained as an artist, every bone in my body thought I'd be a painter," Eggers said.
It was as a sophomore studying at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign that Eggers switched his focus from painting to journalism and his life as a writer took hold.
“I came of age with a desktop computer and learned to write on a Mac," Eggers said, then joked, "I'm inherently a slob so the desktop allowed me to revise, revise, revise.”
This process of writing, and re-writing, continues still today. Eggers, who describes himself as "an endless reviser," shared with the audience his typical work day. He writes in his home office in his converted garage where there is no phone or internet.
“It's taken me a long time to get settled and to remember where I am with what I'm writing," Eggers explained. "I have a chair, a wingback chair...I sit in that chair for eight hours to get 45 minutes done.”
This process has resulted in an extensive eclectic body of work. Eggers is the author of 10 books including fiction and nonfiction. His debut, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, was a New York Times bestselling memoir and a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2001. Other works include Zeitoun, Heroes of the Frontier, A Hologram for the King, a finalist for the 2012 National Book Award, and the international bestseller, The Circle
Eggers told the audience he took notes for about 10 years on situations involving individual's freedoms and privacy versus society's safety and right to know before writing The Circle.
"I do believe a human under surveillance is not free," Eggers said. He described the rise of social media and the increased use of measurements as "the new neediness." While reflecting about the choices his characters make in The Circle, Eggers described their situations as "51/49" since they deal with the ever-pressing struggle of finding ways for improving the world without stripping people of their rights.
Following the 60-minute onstage presentation, Eggers took questions from the audience, which highlighted some of his philanthropic work including 826 National, a network of tutoring centers around the country including one here in Wicker Park.

An Evening with Author Dave Eggers and his appearance in Arlington Heights came on the heels of Eggers receiving the prestigious Carl Sandburg Literary Award in Chicago on October 11. Reflecting on this honor, which is presented to a writer in recognition of the totality of his or her work, Eggers said, "I'm very humbled and happy that I can sit in my garage and write."

It's a wrap! Thanks to all of the filmmakers, judges and student film supporters involved in making this year's Teen Film Fest a success.

Congratulations to the winning films:
  • Best Animation: Lightlife in the Woods by Valerie Depa
  • Best Comedy: 5 Steps to Getting Your Teacher to Like You by Allison Flondro
  • Best Drama / Documentary:  Soldier's Journey Home by Andrew Wisniewski
  • Best Experimental / Music Video: Wanderlust by Kathleen Oku
  • Best Horror: E.D. by David Petratos
  • Best Overall: Epic Rap Battles of History: Woodrow Wilson vs. Theodore Roosevelt by Jeevan Archarya
Thank you to our judges, Tamara Chambers, Robert Kraybill and Dann Gire.
Summer months were busy ones as families and readers of all ages worked to Build a Better World through this year's summer reading challenges. Parents enjoyed working with their children to practice kindness. Tweens and teens came out in record numbers, pushing themselves to read more diverse books. And hundreds of adults shared thanks for the people in their life who go above and beyond on our interactive chalkboard displays.

Overall, more than 4,000 babies, kids, tweens, teens and adults participated, broadening their reading selections and their world view. Some children who completed the summer reading program even used their final book prize as an opportunity to give back. They were excited to choose a book, not for themselves, but to share with a younger child.
What new experiences did you read about this summer? How did you give back to the community? It's never too late! Let’s all be inspired to Build a Better World all year long.

As of August 1, the AHML mobile app will be discontinued. You will still be able to manage your account, search our catalog, and register for programs on your phone or tablet using our mobile-friendly website,

We encourage our app users to bookmark our mobile menu screen at You will still be able to manage your account, search our catalog, place a hold and register for programs on your phone or tablet using our mobile-friendly website. The mobile site is accessible from any browser. By August 1, the library’s mobile website will have the added feature of allowing you to display your barcode on your mobile device. Navigate to My Account as of August 1, and you’ll see an option to display your library card’s barcode. You can then use this barcode at our self-checkout stations or at our Checkout Desk in the library. 

Feel free to contact the library for assistance.
If you would like to create an icon on your device's home screen so you still can access our website quickly, follow the instructions below:

For Android Devices:
1. Open the Chrome app
2. Navigate to
3. Select the Options button (located in the top right corner of the app)
4. Select "Add to Home Screen"
5. Name your bookmark and click Add
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen

1. Open the Firefox app
2. Navigate to
3. Select the Options button (located in the top right corner of the app)
4. Select "Page"
5. Select "Add to Home Screen"
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen

For iPhone and Apple Devices
1. Open the Safari app
2. Navigate to
3. Tap the Share button at the bottom of the screen
4. Select "Add to Home Screen"
5. Name your bookmark and save it
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen
If you have any questions, please contact the library for assistance
Arlington Heights cardholders now have access to Kanopy, a collection of over 30,000 films from over 1,000 top producers, such as Criterion Collection, The Great Courses, PBS, Media Education Foundation, Stanford Executive Briefings, New Day Films, Cohen Films, California Newsreel, Collective Eye and more. Sample feature film titles include Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon, Jean Cocteau’s Beauty and the Beast, Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times, and the documentary Grey Gardens.
Kanopy launches on average 500 new releases per month, ensuring the collection is fresh with the new content. You can watch up to eight videos per month and never need to place a hold. 
The link to Kanopy is on the library's Downloads page or you can bookmark Once you're there, click on the "Sign Up" link and create your profile (you'll be asked for you AHML card number).

The library was bustling with activity this weekend with a record-breaking number of visitors coming to see the amazing one-of-a-kind creations of the Northern Illinois LEGO Train Club on exhibit in the Hendrickson Room. More than 6,200 guests visited the exhibit Saturday and Sunday. Eleven train club members spent six hours assembling the main display. In addition to the Hendrickson exhibit, the library offered LEGO Club in the Marketplace, with large crowds on both days making models then displaying them at the library. Thanks to everyone who stopped by for all the LEGO fun! More photos in our Facebook gallery here. 
What is fake news?
The Internet is full of viral misinformation. Fake news is a false news story designed to look like credible information and makes it difficult to decipher fact from fiction. Fake news typically spreads fast online. How can we wade through it? Always reflect on how you encountered the story. Was it promoted on a website? Did it show up in a social media feed? Was it sent to you by someone you know? Trace the story to its original source.

Here are some other helpful steps to analyze news sources and tools for fact checking.

Put it to the CRAAP Test:
Currency—Can you find a date of the article or photograph? When was it last updated?
Relevance—Who is the intended audience? How does the source meet your needs?
Accuracy—Is the information supported by evidence? Does it cite other sources?
Authority—Who is the author? What are their credentials?
Purpose—Does the site give facts or opinions? Does it have a clear bias?
Is it true? Check out these unbiased fact-checking websites:
Independent, self-sufficient entity wholly owned by its operators who investigate rumors.
Non-partisan, non-profit which acts as a consumer advocate for voters. A project of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania
Independent fact checking website created by the Tampa Bay Times newspaper. PolitiFact has won the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting
Where does the bias lie in the media?
Check out this study from the Pew Research Institute
Other resources and articles about Fake News
When Fake News Stories Make Real News Headlines

Looking for more information? Contact a Specialty Info Librarian at
"I was always looking at the world as a laboratory of ideas," author Eric Weiner told an audience of 180 people who gathered at the library on November 3 to hear the award-winning journalist and NPR contributor speak about his latest book, The Geography of Genius: A Search for the Worlds' Most Creative Places, from Ancient Athens to Silicon Valley, the 2016 One Book, One Village (OBOV) selection.
In an interview-style program moderated by guest interviewer Mary Luckritz, Head of the English and Fine Arts Division at Rolling Meadows High School, Weiner spoke candidly about his writing career which has evolved from veteran war correspondent covering Middle East conflicts to that of nonfiction travel writer.
"I'd come back from reporting on places like Afghanistan and people would ask me 'but what was it really like over there,'" said Weiner. "I realized that what people wanted to know or really wanted to hear were the stories of locals talking in bars or cafes and what their lives were like."
These encounters gave rise to Weiner's current assignment of "travel with a purpose," and three award-winning books which intimately explore places around the globe and cleverly connect them with ideas like bliss, divinity and the theme of this year's OBOV selection - genius and creativity.
"One trait all geniuses or places of genius share is an openness to experience," said Weiner citing cities like Athens, Vienna and Florence then adding, "Geniuses are the people who look at something that everyone else sees and they see something different."
Following the 50-minute conversation on-stage, the author fielded questions from the audience with Weiner jokingly describing the perfect suitcase "bulletproof and easy to grab my phone and notebook" to offering advice on nurturing creativity.
"Take breaks from your work, go for a walk...encourage messiness, have conversations, lots of conversations," Weiner reflected, "You have to be willing to take a detour and realize the destination may not be where you expected."

An Evening with Author Eric Weiner event capped off a day-long exchange between the Washington, D.C.-based author and the Arlington Heights community about The Geography of Genius. Earlier in the day, he spoke to 130 students at Rolling Meadows High School. Read more in the Daily Herald.
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy