Library News

02/05/18
 
AHML is ready for the snow! We have snow brushes available for check out. They are on the rack with the umbrellas near the Express Reserve shelves. Like the umbrellas, the loan period is one week.  
01/31/18
 
If you missed the library's annual Readers’ Party and are looking for your next winter read, here is a recap of staff recommendations:
 
Something Like Happy by Eva Wood
Recommended by Sherri T, Readers Advisory
 
Coming to my Senses by Alice Waters
Recommended by Joan L, Readers Advisory
 
Unforgettable: The Bold Flavors of Paula Wolfert’s Renegade Life by Emily Kaiser Thelin
Recommended by Katie M, Senior Services
 
River of Consciousness by Oliver Sacks
Recommended by Barb W, Senior Services
 
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
Recommended by Pam S, Readers Advisory
 
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Recommended by Julie J, School Services
 
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Recommended by Alice S, Teen Services
 

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
Recommended by Sonya H, Teen Services

 
Find more Staff Picks here
 
Want recommendations on what to read next? Complete our Book Me form and our librarians will provide a list of recommended books for you to try.
 
 
01/23/18
 
Close to 500 people stopped by the library on Saturday evening to get a first look at the library’s newest traveling exhibit, XOXO: An Exhibit About Love & Forgiveness.
 
The opening night party filled the Marketplace and Kids’ World and gave partygoers of all ages the opportunity to explore the power of feelings with many family-friendly activities.
 
“It’s nice to see so many different families. So many different ages, so many different faces,” said Sheila Whiteside, who came to the party with her husband and two children. “I think [the exhibit] reminds us to come back to the basics. It reminds us of what is really important. My kids are smiling and we’re happy.”
 
The main attraction of the night was the debut of XOXO. Families couldn’t get enough of exploring the different parts of this hands-on exhibit. Some popular activities included Holding Hands, which allows people to hold hands to get a memorable quote to appear; Talk to Someone, where families can communicate with one another using telephones set up in the library; and Release the Negative, an activity where participants can write down negative feelings and send them into a paper shredder.
 
“There’s a lot of things you can do here with people that you love and care about,” said nine-year-old Kanon Koshino as she got ready to send a photo she drew of a thunderstorm into Release the Negative’s paper shredder. “You can show how you feel angry, sad and happy.”
 
Attendees also visited the Hub for button making and yarn art activities, the Training Center for a virtual Google Expedition to Paris and Kids’ World for a scavenger hunt, storytimes and arts and crafts.
 
Another highlight of the evening that impressed partygoers was an hour-long performance from Istvan & His Imaginary Band that kept children engaged with bubbles, tambourines and fun music. Istvan performed in the Hendrickson Room to an enthusiastic crowd, which included Tracy Brooks and her three children.
 
“[XOXO] is great, it’s keeping the kids active and giving them unique things to see and touch,” Brooks said. “I like that [Istvan & His Imaginary Band] passed out tambourines, they got to feel and touch their own instruments.”
 

Visit XOXO: An Exhibit About Love & Forgiveness during regular library hours from now to Saturday, March 31 in Kids’ World and the Marketplace. This exhibit was created by the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh with support from The Fetzer Institute and is made possible by the generous support of the Friends of the Library.

 

12/08/17
 
Thank you to all of our wonderful customers, staff and community groups who helped contribute to the Arlington Heights Memorial Library's Holiday Book Drive throughout the past few weeks. 770 books were generously donated for infants, children and teens for Wheeling Township's Adopt-a-Family program. Special thanks go to library staff and volunteers, the Board of Library Trustees members, the Lakeshore Circle Book Club, the Rolling Green Nine-Hole Golf League and Girl Scout Troop 40792. The library has donated 17,132 books to children and teens in need since it introduced the Holiday Book Drive in 1998. Thank you again for helping provide the gift of literacy in our community during the holidays.
12/04/17

For the tenth consecutive year, Arlington Heights Memorial Library (AHML) has received a five-star rating in Library Journal's national rating of public libraries. Five stars is the highest rating that a library can receive. Over the ten editions of LJ's ranking of Star Libraries, 606 libraries have been named Star Libraries in one or more years. A total of 69 libraries received stars in each of the ten rankings. Of those, AHML is one of only 13 public libraries nationwide to have earned a five-star rating each and every year.
 
“We continue to remain strong in library visits, circulation and program attendance. We attribute this to exceptional staff and an engaged community that strongly support the library,” said Mike Driskell, Acting Executive Director. “This award is really about being in tune with our community and providing the services that they want, when they want them. Responsive change to align services with needs is key to receiving this award year after year. Our mission is to focus completely on the community to identify the services and programs that our residents need and do whatever we can to make them happen.”

This year, 7,409 U.S. public libraries qualified to be rated in the Index. In this edition, there are 259 Star Libraries, each receiving three-star, four-star or five-star designations.Twenty two libraries in Illinois have been named Star Libraries for 2017, and out of these, AHML is just one of six public libraries in the state to earn a top five-star rating. Read more here.
11/15/17
 
“Here’s where it all began, at the library. That’s why I’m able to stand where I am and share my passion for books,” said New York Times bestselling author Laura Numeroff, known for books such as If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, Raising a Hero and What Mommies Do Best/What Daddies Do Best.
 
Numeroff spoke to an audience of over 200 adults and children in the library’s Hendrickson Room on Sunday, November 12. She showed some of her favorite books (Harry the Dirty Dog, Eloise, Stuart Little), talked about her early life, showed her favorite pages from her books and answered questions during a Q&A session.
 
During her appearance, Numeroff read If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, which led to laughter and amusement from the crowd.
 
She also read her book Raising a Hero, which tells the story of a puppy training to become a service dog. The book is a part of her new series, Work for Biscuits, which tells the stories of dogs who have jobs.
 
Canine Companions for Independence (CCI) brought along several service dogs in training to the event. One dog named Danica went on stage to show attendees how it is trained to pick up medicine if it falls on the floor. Numeroff later told the audience that a dollar from every copy of Raising a Hero that is purchased will be given to CCI.
 
After reading her stories, she shed some light on the inspiration behind her other work.
 
“One day I saw a Dalmatian and I just got an image in my head, wouldn’t that dog look funny in red sneakers?” she said as she talked about her book Dogs Don’t Wear Sneakers. Other works she talked about include Sometimes I Wonder If Poodles Like Noodles, Laura Numeroff’s 10-Step Guide to Living with Your Monster and Ponyella.
 
After the event, the library celebrated the work of Laura Numeroff in Kids’ World. Many fun activities were available for children such as arts and crafts based on books like If You Give a Pig a Pancake, beanbag tossing games, a scavenger hunt and a meet-and-greet session with the mouse from If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.
 
10/13/17
 
"We choose to live the way we do and participate the way we do," said Dave Eggers to an audience of more than 350 people who packed the Forest View Auditorium on Thursday evening October 12 to hear the award-winning writer, editor and philanthropist speak as he touched on topics like privacy, surveillance and free choice -- all central themes in his dystopian novel The Circle, the 2017 One Book, One Village (OBOV) selection.
 
In an interview-style program moderated by the library's Info Services Supervisor Pam Schwarting, Eggers settled in and talked about his artistic path, which began in the first grade in the Lake Forest public schools and continued with "an uninterrupted string of awesome teachers" who helped spark his interest in writing. A focus on painting followed in middle school and high school.
 
"I trained as an artist, every bone in my body thought I'd be a painter," Eggers said.
 
It was as a sophomore studying at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign that Eggers switched his focus from painting to journalism and his life as a writer took hold.
 
“I came of age with a desktop computer and learned to write on a Mac," Eggers said, then joked, "I'm inherently a slob so the desktop allowed me to revise, revise, revise.”
 
This process of writing, and re-writing, continues still today. Eggers, who describes himself as "an endless reviser," shared with the audience his typical work day. He writes in his home office in his converted garage where there is no phone or internet.
 
“It's taken me a long time to get settled and to remember where I am with what I'm writing," Eggers explained. "I have a chair, a wingback chair...I sit in that chair for eight hours to get 45 minutes done.”
 
This process has resulted in an extensive eclectic body of work. Eggers is the author of 10 books including fiction and nonfiction. His debut, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, was a New York Times bestselling memoir and a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2001. Other works include Zeitoun, Heroes of the Frontier, A Hologram for the King, a finalist for the 2012 National Book Award, and the international bestseller, The Circle
 
Eggers told the audience he took notes for about 10 years on situations involving individual's freedoms and privacy versus society's safety and right to know before writing The Circle.
 
"I do believe a human under surveillance is not free," Eggers said. He described the rise of social media and the increased use of measurements as "the new neediness." While reflecting about the choices his characters make in The Circle, Eggers described their situations as "51/49" since they deal with the ever-pressing struggle of finding ways for improving the world without stripping people of their rights.
 
Following the 60-minute onstage presentation, Eggers took questions from the audience, which highlighted some of his philanthropic work including 826 National, a network of tutoring centers around the country including one here in Wicker Park.
 

An Evening with Author Dave Eggers and his appearance in Arlington Heights came on the heels of Eggers receiving the prestigious Carl Sandburg Literary Award in Chicago on October 11. Reflecting on this honor, which is presented to a writer in recognition of the totality of his or her work, Eggers said, "I'm very humbled and happy that I can sit in my garage and write."

 
08/16/17
 
It's a wrap! Thanks to all of the filmmakers, judges and student film supporters involved in making this year's Teen Film Fest a success.

Congratulations to the winning films:
  • Best Animation: Lightlife in the Woods by Valerie Depa
  • Best Comedy: 5 Steps to Getting Your Teacher to Like You by Allison Flondro
  • Best Drama / Documentary:  Soldier's Journey Home by Andrew Wisniewski
  • Best Experimental / Music Video: Wanderlust by Kathleen Oku
  • Best Horror: E.D. by David Petratos
  • Best Overall: Epic Rap Battles of History: Woodrow Wilson vs. Theodore Roosevelt by Jeevan Archarya
 
Thank you to our judges, Tamara Chambers, Robert Kraybill and Dann Gire.
08/14/17
 
Summer months were busy ones as families and readers of all ages worked to Build a Better World through this year's summer reading challenges. Parents enjoyed working with their children to practice kindness. Tweens and teens came out in record numbers, pushing themselves to read more diverse books. And hundreds of adults shared thanks for the people in their life who go above and beyond on our interactive chalkboard displays.

Overall, more than 4,000 babies, kids, tweens, teens and adults participated, broadening their reading selections and their world view. Some children who completed the summer reading program even used their final book prize as an opportunity to give back. They were excited to choose a book, not for themselves, but to share with a younger child.
 
What new experiences did you read about this summer? How did you give back to the community? It's never too late! Let’s all be inspired to Build a Better World all year long.
 
07/14/17

As of August 1, the AHML mobile app will be discontinued. You will still be able to manage your account, search our catalog, and register for programs on your phone or tablet using our mobile-friendly website, http://www.ahml.info.

We encourage our app users to bookmark our mobile menu screen at http://www.ahml.info/mobile.html. You will still be able to manage your account, search our catalog, place a hold and register for programs on your phone or tablet using our mobile-friendly website. The mobile site is accessible from any browser. By August 1, the library’s mobile website will have the added feature of allowing you to display your barcode on your mobile device. Navigate to My Account as of August 1, and you’ll see an option to display your library card’s barcode. You can then use this barcode at our self-checkout stations or at our Checkout Desk in the library. 

Feel free to contact the library for assistance.
 
If you would like to create an icon on your device's home screen so you still can access our website quickly, follow the instructions below:

For Android Devices:
Chrome
1. Open the Chrome app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Select the Options button (located in the top right corner of the app)
4. Select "Add to Home Screen"
5. Name your bookmark and click Add
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen

Firefox
1. Open the Firefox app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Select the Options button (located in the top right corner of the app)
4. Select "Page"
5. Select "Add to Home Screen"
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen

For iPhone and Apple Devices
1. Open the Safari app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Tap the Share button at the bottom of the screen
4. Select "Add to Home Screen"
5. Name your bookmark and save it
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen
If you have any questions, please contact the library for assistance
 
 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy