Staff Choices

Posted by jmurrow on 07/21/14
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An exceptional debut novel, Tiphanie Yanique's Land Of Love And Drowning is the lush, linguistically exciting chronicle of three generations of a family living in the Virgin Islands, facing an uncertain future as the islands become an U.S. protectorate in the early 1900s (yes, we have protectorates).  
 
Starting with thee orphans of a shipwreck, a state that nicely parallels that of the political uncertainty of the islanders at the time, and continuing on to their descendants, the story details the family’s love affairs, curses, births, deaths, and triumphs over the succeeding generations.  Steeped in a magical realism that nevertheless retains the confusion and foibles of real life, Land of Love and Drowning is an exciting display of a talented writer for whom great things are expected! 
 
Posted by nmurray on 07/14/14
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Books + Travel= Nirvana! Avid readers travel to quaint towns, dingy back streets, or breathtaking mountain tops every time they pick up a book. What if you actually went to the setting of the books you enjoy?
 
Author, Terri Peterson Smith’s non-fiction book, Off the Beaten Page: The Best Trips for Lit Lovers, Book Clubs, and Girls on Getaways, invites us on several literary journeys.
 
Peterson Smith guides you through the basics, from choosing the group members wisely to budgets and the logistics of travel arrangements. Some of the book based excursions are day trips while others are more ambitious involving cross country plane trips. The chapters are well organized featuring 15 cities and numerous book choices, restaurants, hotels, and itineraries.
This book is well written, creative, and makes me want to “hit the road!”
 
 
Travel
Posted by dnapravn on 07/10/14
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Molly Ayer has lived with a number of foster families in her seventeen years. When she gets in trouble at school, her current placement is in jeopardy unless she makes the most of her community service assignment. As she begrudgingly helps the elderly Vivian sort through her belongings in a packed and dusty attic, Molly learns that Vivian has not always lived a comfortable life. Vivian was once a passenger on one of the many orphan trains that traveled west in order to provide children with a "better" life.
 
As Orphan Train unfolds, we find the two main characters growing closer to each other and realizing that despite their age difference they have quite a bit in common. As Molly grows more attached to Vivian and learns more of Vivian's past, she realizes that there may be something she can do to help her.
 
Told in alternating voices, Orphan Train was a quick read and a reminder of a lesser known part of American history. If you'd like to learn more about the orphan trains, make sure to check out these materials on the subject.
Posted by bpardue on 07/03/14
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Would a great work of art be any less great if there was a little technical assistance involved? Computer graphics pioneer Tim Jenison had a fascination with the theory championed by David Hockney and Philip Steadman that the Dutch master Johannes Vermeer may have painted with the aid of a camera obscura, a special projection device that could have helped him reproduce sight lines and shadings with superhuman accuracy. In 2008, he set out to try and deduce just how that might have been done, with his friends Penn & Teller on hand to document the process (Teller directs, Penn narrates). For the next five years, Jenison worked out a process and spent countless hours devising mechanisms that he thought would allow him to make an almost exact replica of Vermeer's The Music Lesson, despite having no previous experience with painting. The film is a nerd's paradise, full of tinkering and speculation. It gets bogged down in minutae at times, but ultimately, it makes a great case that art and technology go hand in hand. 
Posted by Uncle Will on 07/03/14
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If you love intelligent scripwriting, thoughtful plotlines and powerful performances you must watch HBO's True Detective starring Matthew McConaughey & Woody Harrelson.
 
Louisiana detectives Rust Cohle & Martin Hart are polar opposites. Both are damaged goods with plenty of baggage. They join forces over a timespan of 17 years to track a serial killer. The cast is killer. The score is perfect. The setting drips with southerness. The chemistry between McConaughey & Harrelson is unbelievable.
 
If you haven't heard about this series yet, it is time to hop on the wagon.  Once you're hooked, keep checking for Season 2 to show in our catalog. . .awaiting your hold. 
 
Posted by Kelley M on 07/01/14
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The great thing about Dave Eggers is you never know what type of book you’re picking up.  All of Eggers’ plots, settings & characters are very different from each other.  His current book is no exception.  From the very beginning of the book, you are thrown into the situation. At first, you do not know where you are or who is talking, which makes sense for the situation.   The book is essentially the conversations between 30-year-old Thomas & his hostages.  The dialogue drives this story.  The main character, Thomas, kidnaps people that have had a significant impact on his life (and also someone he feels could have a significant impact on his future).  As you read this book, you start to question some of your own morals. 
 
It’s a quick read.  The audiobook is great, since different characters are played by different people, making characters very easy to keep track of.  If you don’t mind a little strong language, this is a very intense, thought-provoking read. 
 
Posted by jkadus on 07/01/14
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Summer is finally here and with it comes the chance to finally get outdoors, relax, and enjoy the beautiful weather.  It’s time to break out, clean off and fire up that grill.  Tired of your same old tried and true recipes?  Want to experiment with veggies on the grill?  Well, why not wander back into the stacks and check out a few books to inspire and ignite your creativity. 
 
Posted by jdunc on 06/25/14
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I love Mary Kay Andrews and was especially pleased with her latest summer novel Save the Date. All of Andrews’ novels take place in and around Savannah, Georgia and feature strong, smart, entrepreneurial women, usually down on their luck. The main character of her latest novel is Carrie Kryzik, a struggling florist overcoming a tough divorce who is working her way into Savannah society. Carrie is determined to make a name for herself as a premier florist and prove to her father that she can be successful. Andrews’ elaborate descriptions of the southern weddings and spectacular flower arrangements are fitting given wedding season. Especially entertaining are the cast of demanding brides and their mothers. When Carrie is pulled into the drama of planning a massive wedding of two well-known Southern families, chaos ensues.
 

Along the way, Carrie meets Jack Finnerty, a gruff handsome man that keeps showing up at all of the weddings around Savannah. Their Goldendoodle puppies, Poppy and Shaz, play a comical role in the lives of Carrie and Jack and their romance. While there are some bumps along the way, you definitely root for Carrie, Jack and her flower business. I especially loved all of the intricate descriptions of flowers and wedding details. This perfect light summer read with a guaranteed happy ending

 
Posted by jmurrow on 06/17/14
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If you enjoy comedy that relies on irreverent humor mixed with keen insights into race relations and popular culture, then you will thoroughly enjoy comedians Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peel’s provocative new show!  From gangsters sharing a passion for Twilight to racist zombies, this show is one of the best comedies out there.  The chemistry and camaraderie between the two comedians is great, and the fact that you know they are having as much fun as you are makes this series all the more enjoyable.  I seriously cannot recommend this series enough! 
 
 
Posted by Ultra Violet on 06/16/14
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If you enjoy entertaining nonfiction about the history of brain science, this is the book for you!
 
Each chapter starts with a rebus that describes the part of the brain which that chapter addresses. No prior knowledge of neurology is needed to understand Kean's work, but he doesn't dumb it down either. The stories from throughout history are fascinating and fun. Some of the descriptions get a bit icky (there were several references to the "custardy" consistancy of a fresh brain) but he doesn't dwell on it or go into gorey detail. And cringing through those moments were worth it to learn about the various characters of medical history who contributed, often through great sacrifice, to our knowledge of the human brain.
 
When was the last time you read a book full of giants, cannibals, and jousting kings... and it was all true?
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