Blog Posts by dnapravn

Posted by dnapravn on 09/09/14
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A Man Called Ove is the debut novel of Swedish author Fredrik Backman and is, in my opinion, a real gem. I laughed out loud, cried out loud, and seriously did not want this book to end.
 
Ove is, in a word, grumpy. He likes things his way and only his way. He drives a Saab and has no patience for anyone that doesn't. He is a rule follower and expects all others to be as well. He spends hours patroling the grounds of his housing community. He is a cat-hater and is not too crazy about kids either. So why does a mangy cat that he refers to as Cat Annoyance keep showing up on his doorstep?
 
When Ove is forced into early retirement, the recently widowed 59-year-old devises a plan to deal with the emptiness in his life. He doesn't figure on the new neighbors, a stray cat, old friends, and a mail carrier, among others, to mess up that plan.
 
This is a story about love and loss, life and death, loyalty, doing the right thing, crazy neighbors, and a whole lot more. I loved this novel and its quirky characters. This is, by far, one of my favorite reads of the year.
Posted by dnapravn on 08/22/14
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I recently watched Bears, the newest Disneynature documentary to be released to DVD and Blu-ray, and all I can say is "wow"!
 
Bears is set on the Alaskan peninsula and follows a mother brown bear and her two cubs through their first year of life. Through absolutely breathtaking cinematography you witness the bears' journey from their winter den high in the mountains down to the shore and their summer food source. You see the many hazards they face and learn much about brown bears in the process. For example, did you know that fifty percent of brown bear cubs do not survive their first year of life? Also, the brown bear has an excellent sense of smell, seven times that of a bloodhound.
 
I will admit to being fascinated by bears and was mesmerized by this beautiful documentary. If I were to name a downside though, I found the narrator to be a bit annoying and the film edited to be overly dramatic at times. However, the beautiful scenery and amazing wildlife shots captured in this film more than made up for any annoyances.
 
While you are waiting for your copy of Bears, don't miss out on others in the Disneynature series. They are all beautifully done as well as educational.
Posted by dnapravn on 07/10/14
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Molly Ayer has lived with a number of foster families in her seventeen years. When she gets in trouble at school, her current placement is in jeopardy unless she makes the most of her community service assignment. As she begrudgingly helps the elderly Vivian sort through her belongings in a packed and dusty attic, Molly learns that Vivian has not always lived a comfortable life. Vivian was once a passenger on one of the many orphan trains that traveled west in order to provide children with a "better" life.
 
As Orphan Train unfolds, we find the two main characters growing closer to each other and realizing that despite their age difference they have quite a bit in common. As Molly grows more attached to Vivian and learns more of Vivian's past, she realizes that there may be something she can do to help her.
 
Told in alternating voices, Orphan Train was a quick read and a reminder of a lesser known part of American history. If you'd like to learn more about the orphan trains, make sure to check out these materials on the subject.
Posted by dnapravn on 06/10/14
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In honor of Father's Day this coming weekend, I thought I'd share a book that I listened to on a recent road trip.
 
Good Talk, Dad: The Birds and the Bees and Other Conversations We Forgot to Have is by author and CBS news correspondent, Bill Geist, and his son, Willie Geist, also an author and NBC news anchor. In it the duo discusses those "mandatory" father and son talks they never got around to having, as well as reminisce about Geist family history. The book is told in a back and forth style and is mostly comical in nature. From sports and holidays, summer camp, taste in music, and a favorite family car, Bill and Willie Geist are naturals at sharing memories of what seems to be a wonderful and sometimes weird family life. The pair provides plenty of laughs but get serious as well, especially as they discuss Bill's seldom mentioned time spent in Vietnam, as well as his struggle with Parkinson's Disease.
 
Good Talk, Dad was an enjoyable audio book and a funny and poignant look at this father-son relationship.
Posted by dnapravn on 05/16/14
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"You know everything you need to know about a person from the answer to the question: What is your favorite book?"
 
A.J. Fikry is a cranky, opinionated bookstore owner who has had a recent string of bad luck. His wife has died in a tragic car accident, sales at his bookstore are down (possibly because he only sells what he likes), and his prized possession, a rare collection of poems by Edgar Allan Poe has been stolen. A.J. feels that his only solution is to further isolate himself from the residents of Alice Island and slowly drink himself into oblivion.
 
When a mysterious package is left at the bookstore, A.J. is given the rare opportunity to start over. He slowly begins to open up and allow himself relationships both with people who live on the island and even a few who don't.
 
A book about books, all types of love, and community.
Posted by dnapravn on 04/10/14
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Every once in a while I get ambitious about cooking, much to my family's delight (or dismay...I'm not 100% sure). So when I discovered 200 Skills Every Cook Must Have: The Step by Step Methods that Will Turn a Good Cook into a Great Cook by Clara Paul and Eric Treuille, I was intrigued. How many of those skills did I already possess and what new skills could I learn?
 
200 Skills Every Cook Must Have is an illustrated guide laid out in a simple step-by-step format. The book concentrates on skills rather than recipes, although it does contain its fair share of basic recipes for sauces and such. Organized by topic, it covers a wide range of cooking skills from very basic skills such as separating eggs and peeling and dicing, to more challenging skills like steaming lobster and making soufflés.
 
The book contained many skills I already knew how to do (thank goodness!), as well as things I know I will never need to do, such as spatchcocking a chicken, which is to remove the back and breast bone so the chicken can be laid out flat. Seriously? More importantly though, it was filled with tips and tricks I'd like to try, as well as things I've done once or twice but am certainly no expert at, such as making gravy or hollandaise sauce.
 
All in all, I found that this book has something for everyone and proves to be a great guide for all skill levels. Bon appétit!
cooking
Posted by dnapravn on 03/11/14
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Right before the first of the year I stumbled across an interview with two-term poet laureate of the United States, Billy Collins. In it he referred to poetry as "the spinach of literature". I found that quote to be interesting, funny, and, at least for me, entirely true. Spinach is good for you and is also an acquired taste. If I had a choice between spinach and ice cream, I would choose ice cream even though spinach is the better choice. So, in addition to the usual promises one makes at the new year, I decided to make one of my New Year's resolutions to read more spinach, or should I say, poetry.
 
I felt I owed it to Mr. Collins to start with one of his collections. He was after all my motivation. I chose his newest book, Aimless Love: New and Selected Poems. Aimless Love combines over fifty new poems with selections from four of his previous books. And not only did I read it, but I also listened to him read in on audio CD. It did not disappoint. Ranging from serious to laugh out loud funny his poems are about everyday life and cover a range of emotions. I found them to be conversational and reader friendly.
 
How are you doing on your New Year's resolutions? It's not too late to add one more. I suggest that you too read your spinach!
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Posted by dnapravn on 02/09/14
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It has been awhile since I read and enjoyed the No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency books by Alexander McCall Smith, so a few weeks ago when I stumbled upon Trains and Lovers, one of his newer stand alone novels, I thought I'd give it a try.
 
The story follows four strangers traveling by train from Edinburgh to London. They start by sharing polite conversation (with no cell phones or devices in sight) and eventually each share a story of how a train or train travel had an effect on their lives. A young Scotsman tells of meeting a young woman while working as an intern and an image of a train in a piece of art. An Englishman shares the story of getting off at the wrong stop during a business trip and impulsively asking a mysterious woman to dinner. An Australian woman shares how her parents met and ran a station in the Australian Outback. An American male sees two men saying good-bye and recalls a relationship from long ago.
 
I find McCall Smith to be a wonderful storyteller who's clear and simple style moves the story along. This was a quick and enjoyable read on a cold winter day.
Fiction
Posted by dnapravn on 12/26/13
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I have read some wonderful books this year. Listed below are my top five fictional choices of 2013. Happy New Year!
 
#5 - The Dinner by Herman Koch
A dark novel showing how far people are sometimes willing to go to protect the ones they love. Two couples meet at a restaurant in Amsterdam for dinner and conversation. As the meal progresses tension builds. We learn of their fifteen-year-old sons and come to the realization that much is being left unsaid.
 
#4 - The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey
This updated version of a classic folktale takes place in the Alaskan wilderness. A childless couple makes a girl out of snow only to glimpse a real girl playing among the trees the next morning. This is a magical story that pulled at my heartstrings.
 
#3 - The Other Typist by Suzanne Rindell
This page-turner told by a less than reliable narrator takes place during the Prohibition era. Rose, a straight-laced typist for a New York police precinct falls under the spell of new girl, Odalie, and finds both her life and her version of the truth spinning out of control.
 
#2 - The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion
This is a feel good story of a brilliant but socially awkward professor of genetics and his plan to find a wife. When he meets bartender, Rosie, he knows without a doubt that she is not what he is looking for. A touching romantic comedy that I would love to see made into a movie.
 
#1 - Benediction by Kent Haruf
A poignant novel written in Haruf's lyrical style, Benediction is the story of a man nearing the end of his life and the family and community that rally around him. This is a beautiful reflection on a man's life and my top choice for 2013.
Posted by dnapravn on 12/15/13
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I can't remember the last time a debut novel made me smile as much as this one did. With characters that are appealing and quirky, The Rosie Project made me laugh out loud at times and wish that it was way longer than 295 pages.
 
Don Tillman is a socially awkward and brilliant professor of genetics. He freely admits that he only has two friends in the world and decides that it is high time to find himself a wife. So of course he goes about the task in the way he does everything: in an extremely logical and orderly manner. He develops a sixteen-page scientifically based survey and refers to it as The Wife Project. While he has never even had a second date before, he is convinced that his survey will find him the perfect partner, filtering out all of the smokers, drinkers, vegans, and women who habitually show up late to things.
 
When he meets Rosie, an unconventional and outgoing bartender, he doesn't even have to administer the survey to realize that she does not qualify as a candidate for his wife. Yet as he helps her try to identify her biological father and finds his very ordered life being turned upside-down, he can't deny that there is something very appealing about her. And truthfully, is the person who is perfect on paper always the right person for you?

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