Staff Choices

Posted by lsears on 09/16/17
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Shtum – adjective – silent; non-communicative. Ben and Emma are the parents of a profoundly autistic boy, Jonah. The story shows a very human, hard-hitting and realistic side of a married relationship that may not have been that strong even in the beginning, deteriorate when faced with the daily unceasing challenges they face in caring for Jonah. There is denial, self-pity, self-medicating that goes on within the parents’ lives. In a misguided attempt to get better care for Jonah in a residential placement, the parents separate. Jonah and his father move in with the grandfather, Georg. The grandfather sees more than Ben gives him credit for and connects with Jonah more deeply. Seeing his father interact with Jonah, Ben learns that words aren’t the only way to communicate.

Shtum is a touching look inside one family contending with an issue with no easy answers. Jem Lester, the author, has personal experience with autism with his own child. This gives the novel a more believable viewpoint for those of us who have little knowledge of autism.
Fiction
Posted by Sltader on 08/28/17
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Lisa Wingate’s novel Before We Were Yours teaches us about one of America's real-life scandals. Georgia Tann was the director of a Memphis-based adoption organization, who kidnapped and sold poor children to wealthy families all over the country. In the year 1939, Rill Foss is a twelve-year-old river gypsy who lives on a Mississippi River shanty boat with her parents and four younger siblings. When an emergency takes their parents to the hospital, strangers take the children from their world and place them into an orphanage.

Throughout this story, a tale is told about the wealthy, politically savvy Stafford family. It is through the work of Avery Stafford, the daughter of a senator and granddaughter of a woman suffering the effects of Alzheimer’s that the story is woven together with Rill’s story. The chapters alternate between Rill's telling and Avery’s resolve to find out what it was that drove her grandmother to be so secretive. As Avery discovers the truth, the story of the Flosses is uncovered.

The author takes an almost unthinkable chapter in our nation’s history and tells a story of most compelling power. That someone like Georgia Tann and her Memphis Tennessee Children’s Home Society could actually exist is shocking. Countless lives of children were affected, stealing their pasts and changing their futures.

Before We Were Yours is a gripping story about two families, and the secrets that surround them.  Beautifully told, this novel will stay with you long after the last page.
Posted by jfreier on 08/27/17
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Nelson DeMille's new novel set to be released on (9/19) is a good and timely thriller featuring a new character, Daniel "Mac" MacCormack. Mac is a former Afghan vet who now runs a charter fishing boat out of Key West when he is approached by Carlos a Cuban expat who gives him an offer he can't refuse.
Mac and his crusty Vietnam vet friend Jack have a meeting with Carlos, the mysterious Eduardo and the beautiful Sara offer Mac to have him use his boat to go to Cuba to retrieve 60 million dollars hidden by Sara's grandfather. It sounds too good to be true and there is something that tell's him he isn't being told the full story.
Mac and Sara fly to Cuba and Jack captain's the boat as they head to island and meet with some dangerous and unreliable characters, and Mac fears come true.
A fun and exciting new story with his signature humor and great new protaganist set in exotic Havana and Key West, the Cuban Affair is a winner.
Suspense
Posted by lsears on 08/14/17
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Helen Watt is a professor at a prestigious London university.  A former student reaches out to Helen for her expertise after a trove of papers has been uncovered during his historic home’s renovation. As soon as Helen sees this repository in person, she realizes its potential value. She allows herself to hold one of the pages dated autumn 1657 in her trembling hands recognizing that it was written in the early days of the readmission of Jewish people to England. Once her university obtains the entire collection she begins the translation work paired with a brilliant but brash young American post-graduate student, Aaron Levy.
 
As Helen and Aaron work on the translations, they discover that the scribe is a woman. This is unheard of in the 17th century when education is limited and women’s lives are dictated by social status. They call her Aleph until they find out her real name. Unfolding in a dual time-line format, we come to see how the scribe comes to live in England after Rabbi HaCoen Mendes rescues her and her brother having been orphaned in Portugal, how her life plays out and how she struggles against society’s expectations of her. She encounters threats against the freedom she has, loss, poverty, the Great Plague, the Great London Fire. In the meantime, Helen and Aaron continue their race to decipher the papers while another team of researchers competes with them to see who will publish their findings first.
 
Author Rachel Kadish has succeeded in creating an engrossing story that is carefully constructed, complex with many layers both in the historical timeline and in the modern one. Elements of history amid personal plight. The right amount of information is revealed at a time to entice the reader to find out more. This is a richly worded and detailed novel. Do not be dissuaded by the length of its pages; I hardly noticed it.
 
One of my favorite quotes from the book and from which, I imagine, the title of the book is derived is on page 196 “. . . for my hands would never again turn the page of a book, nor be stained with the sweet, grave weight of Ink, a thing I had loved since first memory”.
 
Posted by Sltader on 07/18/17
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The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid features alternating timelines as an aging starlet, Evelyn Hugo, participates in a journalism interview about her life story. Lucky for us, her answers take on a life of their own, allowing readers to be sucked back in time to an era of glamour, strategy, and secrecy. Jenkins Reid’s writes a fascinating story that is easy to forget that it is fiction. It feels like an actual memoir. Evelyn's character shares perspectives on equality issues, relationships, the spectrum of sexuality, the cost and consequences of success, and taking ownership of (and responsibility for) one's life. It is also, about how times have changed, and although opportunities of significance are becoming more and more accessible to women these days, sometimes we are the ones who continue to stand in our own way.

Evelyn is a highly complex woman.  She is bold, undaunted, fierce, unapologetic and surprisingly tender and vulnerable as well. She was so well crafted that I felt like I was getting the inside scoop on a Hollywood icon’s life even though she is a fictional character. The story is glamorous, scandalous and filled with juicy gossip, yet it was also touching. It really reads like the epic saga of one woman’s life and I enjoyed every mesmerizing page of this book. I recommend The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo as the perfect vacation or beach read!
Posted by bpardue on 07/13/17
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Progressive rock is probably the most-maligned sub-genre of popular music (although disco gives it a run for its money). However, when played by truly adventurous musicians, prog rock could be pretty, magnificent, experimental or terrifying, often within the same 23-minute suite. Here, David Weigel tries to tell prog's story--from the heady joining of psychedelia and classical music in Procol Harum's "Whiter Shade of Pale" to 70s classics by King Crimson, Genesis, Yes, ELP, Rush, etc., through to the corporate-prog of Asia, and finally on to the artists who kept prog alive from the 90s to the present (Dream Theater, Porcupine Tree/Steven Wilson, The Mars Volta, etc.). If there's any central figure to all this, it's King Crimson's Robert Fripp, who kept breaking up his band just as it seemed on the verge of popular success, never compromising his musical vision. As a fan, it's easy to complain that the narrative is a bit too Anglo-centric (although some French and Italian bands are mentioned), but it generally gets the story right, and enough names and albums are dropped to give curious readers good music to track down.
 
 
Posted by annetteb on 07/02/17
The robots have invaded the library and they're ready for playing and programming fun! 
 
At the Tech Bar, you can try a different robot model each week. Currently, you can experience using the Ozobots and Spheros
 
Come cool off at the library and visit the Tech Bar next to the Tech Help Desk to try out the latest robot models. 
Posted by bweiner on 07/02/17
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Worlds Apart (2015), a drama from Greece, set in Greece, is a story that surrenders itself to the qualities that bind us as humans instead of succumbing to the ones that divide us. Although the stories reflect the economic difficulties in Greece, the struggles are universal.

The film intersects three stories filled with passion, pain, love and hope; stories of betrayal, emptiness and missed chances. The people in this world are you and I: kind, compassionate, positive and sometimes misguided. Good people making choices that lead to uncomfortable resolutions.

Academy Award winner J.K. Simmons turns in an endearing performance as a retired German professor looking for a second chance in life. Christopher Papakaliatis, who also portrays the troubled husband Giorgos, superbly directs the ensemble and circuitously connects the stories. To say more would be to reveal too much: savor these richly genuine relationships in this small treasure of a film. (In Greek and English, with subtitles)
 
 
Posted by annetteb on 06/30/17
Do you enjoy indie, foreign, or classic films that other streaming services do not seem to have? If so, kanopy is a streaming service worth exploring!
 
With kanopy, you'll have access to a broad range of entertaining as well as educational films, including the phenomenal Criterion/Jannus collection, Music Box Films, PBS, and The Great Courses. You can stream videos via your PC or device web browser. A Roku app is also, available so you can also "cast" from your device to Apple TV & Chromecast. kanopy has also released iOS and Andriod apps
 
For more information, visit the kanopy website or visit the Tech Help Desk. 
Posted by annetteb on 06/30/17
Are you traveling somewhere exciting this summer or enjoying a relaxing "staycation"? No matter what you have planned, you can document your summer adventures with the Canon EOS-Rebel T5i DSLR Camera for external use. 
 
The DSLR camera gives users exceptional image quality and a variety of automatic functions that optimize settings for given subject type, lighting conditions and desired effects. This is a highly user-friendly camera that comes with the following: Canon Zoom Lens, 3 lens caps, strap, SanDisk 32GB SD card, SD card reader, USB cable, 2 batteries, charger, charger cable, user manual, and Pelican case.
 
For more information, visit the Tech Help Desk. 
 
 
Want recommendations on what to read next? Email advisory@ahml.info and we will be happy to assist you in finding a great book to read.
Browse our collection of eBooks and eAudiobooks and learn how to use them with your eReader, tablet, or computer.

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6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy