Fall in Love With Science Fiction

 
Have you ever wondered what kind of films do best at the box office, which tower above the rest in terms of ticket sales?

Science fiction films are by far the fan favorites. Star Wars, Avatar, The Avengers, the Jurassic Park films. If these are what we choose to watch, why are we so hesitant to read science fiction?

Maybe we are afraid to hold a mirror up to who we are. Reflection is the essence of good science fiction. It may seem to transport you to the unknown, but it really explores the possibilities of who we are and the expectations of who we can be.

Check out Hominids by Robert J. Sawyer; book one of the Neanderthal Parallax. In an alternate universe, the Neanderthals have evolved at a faster rate than the Homo sapiens have, a situation that perplexes the human scientists. They discover that there is much to learn and share for the two civilizations, and a collaboration begins. But what is the cost for this rapid development?

In The Left Hand of Darkness, by the late, revered Ursula K. LeGuin, gender is fluid, making opportunities in childbirth and leadership available to all. We may not have that option, but once you take gender out of the equation, the prospects become endless. On the planet Gethen, recognition occurs based on ability, not predetermination by gender.

In The Secret City by Carol Emshwiller, we see the conditions of hospitality and hostility imposed on Others, people different from ourselves, and we grapple with the difficulties of assimilation and inclusion.

Real world problems, reimagined by brilliant minds; writers asking the big questions and taking a stab at explanations or alternate pathways. Check out some science fiction today and be part of the discussion.
 
 
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6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy