What's Up at the Library?


For 11 years, Library Journal's Movers & Shakers list has been spotlighting librarians and others in the library field who are doing extraordinary work to serve their users and to move libraries and library services forward. This year, Digital Services Manager Richard Kong made the list as one of the tech leaders of 2012.
 
Read about his technology innovations, including launching the Studio, our new digital media lab.
 
Congratulations to Richard!



Now you can print from anywhere using the library's new wireless printing service. Send us documents from your computer, your phone, your tablet, then come to the library to pick them up. It costs just 5¢ for a black & white page and 50¢ for a color copy.
 
Learn more about this convenient new service.
 

 




Wednesday, January 18, marked the 125th anniversary of the incorporation of the village of Arlington Heights, and the library played a key role in the village's celebration festivities.
 
Thanks to the efforts of Local History and Genealogy Librarian Michael Mulholland and IT Manager Mike Driskell, an antiqued facsimile of the incorporation papers was displayed at the event. The two library staff members traveled to the Cook County archives in Chicago to scan the incorporation document which was then printed on paper that looks like parchment.
 
Pictured above at the celebration are Executive Director Paula Moore, Michael Mulholland, Mayor Arlene Mulder, Friends of the Library President Stephen Diedrich, Communications and Marketing Director Deb Whisler, and Mike Driskell.
 
Library staffers Deb Whisler and Mike Driskell were appointed to the Quasquicentennial Committee. The Friends of the Library are also supporting the effort through their purchase of two street banners and a decorated "train" to be displayed this summer at the library. Look for special historical programs this year as well that are funded by the Friends.
 
Link to Daily Herald article about the event.


 
The library was voted the 2011 Business of the Year by the members of the Arlington Heights Chamber of Commerce at their annual installation and recognition dinner. Celebrating the honor were, front row, Brian Shepard, Mike Driskell, Shannon Scanlan, and Diane Accurso. Back row, Jennifer Nitch, trustee G. Victor Johnson, Deb Whisler, trustee David Unumb, former trustee Jim Bertucci.
 
The Library at the Installation Dinner

"We're honored to receive this award from the business community. We value our opportunity to partner with them," says Deb Whisler, Director of Communications and Marketing.

Whisler was also an honoree. She received the 2011 President's Award from outgoing president Cindee Manaves for her mentoring and continuing contributions to the Chamber of Commerce.

In the coming year, three library staff members will have leadership roles in the Chamber. IT Manager Mike Driskell joins the Board of Directors, Business Librarian Shannon Scanlan will be Co-Chair of the Chamber's Professional Women's Council and Lead Cataloger Jennifer Nitch continues as Chairman of the Young Professionals. We look forward to a great year and continuing a successful collaboration with the business community.

See Daily Herald article.



In the news

There’s always something new you can learn at the library. Recently, three generations of an Arlington Heights family –grandma Dolores, mom Kathy, and daughter Jennifer – participated in our Eco-friendly Floral Design workshop. Here’s what they had to say about their library learning experience: “As a family, we are truly grateful for all the amazing resources our library offers, such as the workshop we recently attended. It was a learning experience for three generations!” Check our calendar for all of our learning opportunities.


Library News

Beginning January 1, late charges for library items will be $0.25 per item/per day. The only exception is eReaders. In addition, library users will have a three-day grace period to return or renew items. If the items are returned or renewed within the grace period, the late fee will be waived.
 

Why the changes? “We wanted to simplify the late charges and be more customer friendly,” states Library Operations Director Jason Kuhl. “Late charges serve the purpose of getting our materials back, not increasing revenue. Ninety-one percent of items are returned on time, and these changes will make it even easier for our customers to avoid having to pay late charges."




In the coming year, we will begin work on a building project that will help us be even more responsive to our residents’ needs. Many of the changes will revolve around helping residents use the technology that is becoming increasingly essential in school, business, and at home.

“Every day, we’re helping residents with their phones, eBook readers, and social media,” said Ming Heraty, Welcome Desk Manager. According to the Pew Research Center 35% of adults in the U.S. own a smartphone as of July 2011, up from 21% just 18 months earlier. Circulation of eBooks at the library has increased 157% in the past year, while circulation of print books has decreased 4%. The need for technology assistance is not limited to leisure activities. “I often hear from our local business owners who need help using technology and social media to help market and run their businesses,” said Shannon Scanlon, Business Librarian.
 
The reallocation of space within the building will allow us to meet the essential technology requirements of our residents as well as a number of other longstanding needs. Some of the new features:
  • A digital studio where residents can work on projects like creating and editing video or scanning and organizing digital photos. It will feature equipment and software that is not practical for an individual to purchase.
  • Additional space dedicated to working with residents specifically on their technology needs.
  • Additional small group/conference rooms that will more than triple the existing rooms that are in constant use.
  • Additional space for library programs, including an expanded room for adult and teen programs. Last year, attendance at adult programs increased 62% over the previous year.
  • An expanded area for teens that includes space for group projects, computers and books.
None of these service enhancements will come at the expense of our existing services and collections. “We will continue to have one of the largest and best collections of print books in the state,” said Paula Moore, Library Director. “In fact, we will be providing more space to highlight the collection, making it more accessible and appealing to our customers.”

The renovations will get underway this fall and should be completed in four to five months. The entire $2.6 million cost of the project will be taken from our fund balance and will not require any increase in taxes. “We have saved specifically for this project since defining our next generation of services,” said Moore. “Just as we have not increased our levy three of the past four years, we remain committed to making sure the library is a good value for our residents.”


Library News

Stop by Kids' World to see our newly refurbished dollhouse. It is now interactive. Touch the screen and rooms light up; touch toys in the rooms and books pop up. There are five objects in each room that correspond to books in our collection. See if you can find them all!
 



We're 4 for 4! For the fourth consecutive year, the library has received a five-star rating in Library Journal's national rating of public libraries, the LJ Index of Public Library Service 2011. Five stars is the highest rating that a library can receive. Only 85 libraries across the country received this rating which is based on the annual number of library visits, circulation, program attendance and public Internet computer use. Thanks for making us a 5-star library!



We now have Nook Color eReaders with titles just for kids. A.H. cardholders age 12 and older can check one out for two weeks. There are 46 titles on each, and they have something for all ages, including books nominated for the Rebecca Caudill, Monarch and Bluestem awards. There are even 17 interactive books that use touch-screen technology. You will find them in the catalog under Nook Color. Reserve one for your family.


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If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy