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In the coming year, we will begin work on a building project that will help us be even more responsive to our residents’ needs. Many of the changes will revolve around helping residents use the technology that is becoming increasingly essential in school, business, and at home.

“Every day, we’re helping residents with their phones, eBook readers, and social media,” said Ming Heraty, Welcome Desk Manager. According to the Pew Research Center 35% of adults in the U.S. own a smartphone as of July 2011, up from 21% just 18 months earlier. Circulation of eBooks at the library has increased 157% in the past year, while circulation of print books has decreased 4%. The need for technology assistance is not limited to leisure activities. “I often hear from our local business owners who need help using technology and social media to help market and run their businesses,” said Shannon Scanlon, Business Librarian.
 
The reallocation of space within the building will allow us to meet the essential technology requirements of our residents as well as a number of other longstanding needs. Some of the new features:
  • A digital studio where residents can work on projects like creating and editing video or scanning and organizing digital photos. It will feature equipment and software that is not practical for an individual to purchase.
  • Additional space dedicated to working with residents specifically on their technology needs.
  • Additional small group/conference rooms that will more than triple the existing rooms that are in constant use.
  • Additional space for library programs, including an expanded room for adult and teen programs. Last year, attendance at adult programs increased 62% over the previous year.
  • An expanded area for teens that includes space for group projects, computers and books.
None of these service enhancements will come at the expense of our existing services and collections. “We will continue to have one of the largest and best collections of print books in the state,” said Paula Moore, Library Director. “In fact, we will be providing more space to highlight the collection, making it more accessible and appealing to our customers.”

The renovations will get underway this fall and should be completed in four to five months. The entire $2.6 million cost of the project will be taken from our fund balance and will not require any increase in taxes. “We have saved specifically for this project since defining our next generation of services,” said Moore. “Just as we have not increased our levy three of the past four years, we remain committed to making sure the library is a good value for our residents.”


Library News

Stop by Kids' World to see our newly refurbished dollhouse. It is now interactive. Touch the screen and rooms light up; touch toys in the rooms and books pop up. There are five objects in each room that correspond to books in our collection. See if you can find them all!
 



We're 4 for 4! For the fourth consecutive year, the library has received a five-star rating in Library Journal's national rating of public libraries, the LJ Index of Public Library Service 2011. Five stars is the highest rating that a library can receive. Only 85 libraries across the country received this rating which is based on the annual number of library visits, circulation, program attendance and public Internet computer use. Thanks for making us a 5-star library!



We now have Nook Color eReaders with titles just for kids. A.H. cardholders age 12 and older can check one out for two weeks. There are 46 titles on each, and they have something for all ages, including books nominated for the Rebecca Caudill, Monarch and Bluestem awards. There are even 17 interactive books that use touch-screen technology. You will find them in the catalog under Nook Color. Reserve one for your family.



Got a great green idea? Enter the Illinois Library Association’s “Go Green, Win Green” contest, and you may win one of four $1,000 cash prizes. To learn more and to submit an entry, click here.



Recently the Suburban Mosaic program announced this year's selection of books that they recommend for readers of all ages to promote cultural understanding through literature. The group is made up of representatives from organizations throughout the Northwest Suburbs, including libraries. 
 
This year's books include:
Say Hello by Rachel Isadora (preschool)
The Sandwich Swap by Queen Rania of Jordan (grades K - 4)
Extra Credit by Andrew Clements (grades 3 - 5)
A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park (grades 6 - 8)
Girl in Translation by Jean Kwok (adult & high school)



Library eBooks for Kindle are now available through our website.
 
See instructions for downloading eBooks to the Kindle. Questions? Contact the Welcome Desk at 847-506-2640.
 



On Monday, August 15, long time library volunteer Joe Cesario was awarded the fourth annual Dr. Kenneth Hood Award by Village President Arlene Mulder at the Village Board Meeting. This special award is given by the Village's Senior Citizens Commission.
 
After retiring from a long career at First National Bank of Chicago where he developed computer applications and networks, Joe turned to teaching computer classes for seniors and tutoring unemployed people seeking computer skills for work. For the past 11 years he has contributed over 3000 hours as a volunteer for the Arlington Heights Memorial Library, significantly impacting the lives of many seniors who use the library’s services at the Senior Center.  Joe was also the recipient of the 2007 Arlington Heights Memorial Library Volunteer of the Year award.


Library News

On Friday, July 29, Farm Bureau members from Cook and Kendall counties toured the library with State Representative David Harris as part of the Farm Bureau's Adopt-A-Legislator program.
 
Farmers from rural areas are matched with city and suburban legislators and visit their districts to learn about the important issues for cities and suburbs. Legislators like Representative Harris then visit the rural districts for farm tours to learn about the issues facing farmers.
 
In addition to the library, the tour also included Village Hall, the downtown business area, Tuscan Market, Metropolis and the Backstretch at Arlington Park. According to Representative Harris, the library was chosen for the tour because "it is one of the leading libraries in the state," and he wanted to showcase the Business Center, a "great resource for the community."



The library's Flinstone mobile with Fred, Wilma, Barney, Betty and members of the Royal Order of Water Buffalos won first place for creativity (non-commercial category) in the July 4 parade. This is the fifth year that we can claim this distinction thanks to the talents of Information Technology Manager Mike Driskell and his family and friends who built the float.
 
Also participating in the parade was the bookmobile along with a group of our junior library volunteers, staff members and Trustee G. Victor Johnson. Our thanks to the Friends of the Library once again for generously funding the float and giveaways.
 
View more photos of the parade.


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6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy